It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Are we in a global cooling period?

page: 3
19
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:22 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults



what you said has nothing to do with anything

Actually, it does.
Humans are pumping billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere. It doesn't go away. That is causing atmospheric CO2 levels to rise (also oceanic CO2 levels). That is causing temperatures to rise. We are not cooling, we are warming.

edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

yeah it does go away plants turn it into oxygen with a process called photosynthesis

if it doesn't go away how did it go away already from when the dinosaurs were here??

you don't make any sense

Columbia.edu



Plants and photosynthetic algae and bacteria use energy from sunlight to combine carbon dioxide (C02) from the atmosphere with water (H2O) to form carbohydrates. These carbohydrates store energy. Oxygen (O2) is a byproduct that is released into the atmosphere. This process is known as photosynthesis.


here let me quote you...




It doesn't go away.



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:30 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults


yeah it does go away plants turn it into oxygen with a process called photosynthesis
For a while, yes. Then the leaves fall and rot and the CO2 goes back into the atmosphere.

In fact, you can see it happen in the CO2 data. See those seasonal bumps? That's when the CO2 gets back into the atmosphere. And the level keeps on rising. The plants can't keep up.



You can read about it, if you want:
www2.ucar.edu...


edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:35 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults
The article you cited says sea levels have been rising except one or two years when Australia kept enough extra rain landlocked in an interior lake. That doesn't change the trend at all.

Runaway warming could suddenly raise sea levels dramatically and then it would be a global disaster, too late to do much. Some think it's already too late and a slow motion train wreck. Hopefully it's not too late.



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:39 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults

Of course not. The guy who invented the internet said so...



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

so what happened when the atmosphere had 5x the amount of carbon?

did the oceans turn acid and everything die out?

you're not adding up here, we have clear evidence of orders of 5x the amount of carbon in the atmosphere yet we had thriving rainforest across the globe with giant animals and plants otherwise known as megafauna everywhere

so what does what you're saying have anything to do with that it doesn't make sense, you are bringing up talking points not properly objectively analyzing any of our history and comparing it to today

nature will select animal and plant life that's less sensitive to acid



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:44 PM
link   
a reply to: orionthehunter

sea levels are going down not up how does that fit your narrative? it doesn't but yea Australia



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:49 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults


nature will select animal and plant life that's less sensitive to acid
That will continue to happen. That won't make anything any easier for our civilization though. It takes quite a while to occur though, and things seem to be changing fast.

edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 09:50 PM
link   
a reply to: toysforadults




sea levels are going down not up

No they aren't. Do you bother to read the links you post?

Scientists have been measuring this rise from satellites since 1993, using instruments called altimeters. But for an 18-month period that began in the middle of 2010, something surprising happened. Instead of rising, sea levels fell.

edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:07 PM
link   
The sunspots are disappearing. The current sun cycle is strange. No one know wth is going on with sun cycle right now.



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:13 PM
link   
a reply to: whiteblack




The current sun cycle is strange.

It actually followed the prediction quite closely.
From 2009:

The panel has decided that the next solar cycle will be below average in intensity, with a maximum sunspot number of 90. Given the predicted date of solar minimum and the predicted maximum intensity, solar maximum is now expected to occur in May, 2013. Note, this is a consensus opinion, not a unanimous decision. A supermajority of the panel did agree to this prediction

www.swpc.noaa.gov...

It is declining a bit faster than the prediction however, but the prediction was as good as it ever is. For the most part.

edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

why did the last Ice age end?



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Aallanon

A combination of factors involving the tilt of Earth's axis and its orbit around the Sun.
www.indiana.edu...

It's more properly described as a glacial period though. We are currently in an actual ice age.

edit on 6/17/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: toysforadults


yeah it does go away plants turn it into oxygen with a process called photosynthesis
For a while, yes. Then the leaves fall and rot and the CO2 goes back into the atmosphere.

In fact, you can see it happen in the CO2 data. See those seasonal bumps? That's when the CO2 gets back into the atmosphere. And the level keeps on rising. The plants can't keep up.



You can read about it, if you want:
www2.ucar.edu...



That's not what your picture implies



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:35 PM
link   
a reply to: Aallanon

Then please, tell me what it does imply.



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: Phage

yeah it does go away plants turn it into oxygen with a process called photosynthesis

if it doesn't go away how did it go away already from when the dinosaurs were here??

you don't make any sense

Columbia.edu



Plants and photosynthetic algae and bacteria use energy from sunlight to combine carbon dioxide (C02) from the atmosphere with water (H2O) to form carbohydrates. These carbohydrates store energy. Oxygen (O2) is a byproduct that is released into the atmosphere. This process is known as photosynthesis.


here let me quote you...




It doesn't go away.

You are mistaken.

The O2 that plants emit from photosynthesis is not from breaking down CO2, but rather breaking down water - H2O.

I will reiterate: CO2 is not turned into O2. 2 H2O molecules are split to get O2. Plants split water during photosynthesis to produce the air we breathe.

Think about what that means.
edit on 22Sun, 17 Jun 2018 22:43:16 -0500America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago6 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2018 @ 10:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

I can't. I can't read it.



posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 12:55 AM
link   
The number of sunspots are low in last 8 years compare to past few sun cycles. And sunspots will continue decline in next few sun cycles *prediction*



posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 01:07 AM
link   
a reply to: whiteblack

Perhaps.
But they've been declining for the past 50 years or so. Meanwhile the planet gets warmer.


Fact is there isn't much evidence that sunspot count is connected to warming or cooling on a global scale.

edit on 6/18/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)


(post by ozb1777 removed for a manners violation)

new topics

top topics



 
19
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join