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A minimum-wage worker needs 2.5 full-time jobs to afford a one-bedroom apartment in most of the US

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posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: JDmOKI
a reply to: JinMI

Agreed but not everyone can get that better job and some people will always work crap jobs.

The homeless problem growing is insentive enough to help the low income workers


They can't or won't? What is stopping access to experience and education needed for higher waged jobs?


I think the homeless problem is closer correlated to drugs and alcohol than it is jobs. I'm open to correction on the subject.




posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: CB328



You want the government to fix the problems that the government made?


Are you seriously suggesting that government can't do anything to improve things???


Equally to all taxpayers, that's exactly what I'm saying.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

To a good degree I think you're right.

However, where I live, absurd home and rent prices have contributed a great deal. If landlords can get more rent and homeowners can sell because demand is high, why shouldn't they? Prices a lot of people out both markets.

Median single family home price is over $750k here. That's sort of terrifying.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

I've been here 18 years, but I'm originally from Idaho. I look at the listings there now and then to see.

You can get a nice three bedroom house, sometimes with some acreage, for what a two bedroom apartment costs here. Not to mention cheaper energy costs and far lower property taxes and insurance if your buying.

Don't get me wrong here. You can still live cheap in Alaska, just not in Anchorage. Still places you can buy cheap land and put up a cabin if you have the money to live one. Still I'd never recommend anyone move here unless they had a good paying job already. People come up here all the time and join the ranks of the homeless. A vacation here is not for the weak of wallet.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Alaska does not seem like a good place to be homeless.

You can die real easy there. Bears. And hypothermia. And stuff.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: Phage

That is astronomical from my point of view and location and we are in a super hot market!

What I've noticed is that there are essentially slum lords that rent section 8 apartments and some homes and then there are 1k/month rental homes. The middle renters and buyer are being pushed out of the market.

So, yea, home prices are surely an issue. To some extent this could fall back on the FHA loan program and other economic variables that I'm not too knowledgeable on.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: CB328

Minimum wage jobs are designed for younger people with limited job skills / experience in the work force. They were never intended to be a job that could support a family.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

Besides price, inventory is a huge problem.

Supply and demand. It's an island with increasing demand.

Terrifying but I don't think raising the minimum wage is going to help. Unless it's raised to $70k/year. But then guess what happens to prices?



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:10 PM
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originally posted by: Aallanon
Minimum wage jobs are for high school sophomores

Yes, well that’s true. I worked minimum wage $2.10 p/hr in high school, after school, weekends and all summer. Then I got a trade, also worked minimum wage while apprenticing, after that I had my certificate and was able to increase my earning power.

However, this was decades ago , times were different, I was able to get my own apartment, no room mates and survive on minimum wage. I loved paycheque to paycheque, very strict budget.


I’m not sure it’s possible these days due to the higher cost of living expenses.

I still think I might be able to pull it off. The key is in budgeting, knowing what you hsve left, after rent, food and utilities, gas etc. A lot of my friends couldn’t do it and kept asking to move into my place. I said No! Don’t want roomies.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: Phage

We are well on our way to those numbers here and no sales or income tax means way to high property taxes. Soon Alaska will start turning into a rich peoples playground and the people living here will suffer greatly.

To go off grid, you need a steady income of some kind but there is that route at least.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: CB328

Government jobs are a net loss to GDP. Period. It doesn't matter if you don't believe it.

A private-sector job pays for itself. A private-sector job creates other jobs. A public-sector job is paid for by taxpayers.

Simple economics.

As for infrastructure jobs being paid by the states, it takes less from the government that way. I don't know why you would think the actual jobs created by infrastructure repair don't count to you, since the topic is paying workers, as you yourself said.

As for the government having less debt when taxes were higher, you wear Obama's hopey-changey thing. When taxes were higher under Obama we added 10 trillion dollars to the debt.

So no, you are quite wrong.


Over the past 100 years, there have been three major periods of tax-rate cuts in the U.S.: the Harding-Coolidge cuts of the mid-1920s; the Kennedy cuts of the mid-1960s; and the Reagan cuts of the early 1980s. Each of these periods of tax cuts was remarkably successful as measured by virtually any public policy metric.


Wage growth is actually happening again under Trump... they were pretty much flat under Obama, you are correct.

One of the biggest reasons that the cost of living has skyrocketed was higher taxes, btw.

A tax on a company is basically a price increase on their product. Which is passed on to the consumer.

Again, a basic understanding of economics would help you.




posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I agree, the minimum wage argument is a moot point and will further increase poverty based on very simple economics.

That's not to say that 'everything is fine,' as it currently is obviously. I imagine SandD play a much larger part in your neck of the woods than say mine and the price of homes reflect that even given the hotness of the markets.

Banks in tandem with the government certainly have added weight to those home prices based on interest rates alone. How that reflects market prices for homes, I can only speculate.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Many do freeze every winter. Drinkers mostly who refuse to got to a shelter, but we do have shelters. I've had to call the community patrol to come save more than one who passed out in front of my office when it was way below zero. They can't save them all though.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:15 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

No hypothermia deaths here.
They find other ways.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:19 PM
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You mean like shovel ready jobs?? Hummmmm where have I heard that line before????a reply to: CB328




posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:23 PM
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In most places in the US, $200,000 is a very nice house.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:24 PM
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I thought NY was unbelievably overpriced and taxed! Where are you? Greenwich Connecticut?!? Malibu??a reply to: Phage



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:24 PM
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yea, home prices are surely an issue. To some extent this could fall back on the FHA loan program and other economic variables


No it couldn't. What is wrong with you that you have a pathological need to blame the government for every problem in the world?

The two reasons are having a huge population, and letting business turn housing into a commodity. Both of which are conservative policies, though the government helps by letting lots of people immigrate here.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: WUNK22

He lives in Alabama. He'll take you out and teach you how to noodle for river catfish.



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: CB328




and letting business turn housing into a commodity.

I'm not a business but my house is indeed, a commodity. Because people want to buy it. There is nothing new about real estate being for sale. And that's what a commodity is.

edit on 6/15/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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