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Google Alpha Jet fire

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posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 09:31 PM
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aviation-safety.net...



The aircraft (formerly 41+65) experienced an in-flight fire and subsequent gear-up landing runaway 22L at Sacramento Mather Airport (KMHR), Sacramento, California. It sustained substantial damage and the two occupants were uninjured.

The Alpha Jet belongs to H211 LLC, a company owned by Google executives Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Eric Schmidt and is based at Moffet Field, CA.:


Most of the press didn't mentioned this was a Google owned plane. Otherwise probably not much of a story.




posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 10:09 PM
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Intel has a corporate office just up Highway 50 from this airport.

Connection?



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 10:32 PM
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Rumor has it, the co-pilot was Googling "how to survive an engine fire on an Alpha Jet" at that exact moment.

Google owes Google a beer...

EDIT TO ADD: If the co-pilot had Googled "Brony leather fetish" instead, the entire episode would have ended in tragedy... and permanently ended a beloved meme at the same time.

It's those little things that advance humankind in a meaningful way.
edit on 15-6-2018 by madmac5150 because: Sarcasm meter pegged



posted on Jun, 15 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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www.mv-voice.com...

This is the story or cover story for the Alpha Jet. Note this model plane is often use for high altitude research, especially if flying over 50kft to see the curvature of the earth is considered research.



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: gariac

maybe something to do with their loon program



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: penroc3
a reply to: gariac

maybe something to do with their loon program


As a FYI, Project Loon balloons show up on adsb as HIBAL.

The Alpha Jet predates Project Loon.



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: gariac

So you're telling me that Alphabet owns an Alpha Jet? [rimshot]



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: Barnalby
a reply to: gariac

So you're telling me that Alphabet owns an Alpha Jet? [rimshot]


Nope. The jet is owned by individuals comprising H211.



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: gariac
www.mv-voice.com...

This is the story or cover story for the Alpha Jet. Note this model plane is often use for high altitude research, especially if flying over 50kft to see the curvature of the earth is considered research.



The service ceiling on the Alpha is 48,000 feet.What the Alpha does best is make noise. Nearby homeowners are not going to be happy. H211 was going to do research for NASA using their other aircraft, but since those were certified under Part 25 Normal (Standard) category the mods couldn't be made without huge paperwork requirements and delays, they needed something certified in the Experimental category, like the Alpha. You can get away with a lot of mods on an Experimental, as long as the aircraft remains airworthy.



posted on Jun, 16 2018 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

I've seen alpha jet ceiling at both 48kft and 50kft, but no spec on the climb rate.

The only time I've watched the Alpha Jet extensively was at the Space Ship One qualification flights. I don't remember it being particularly noisy.

alpha jet at right



posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: F4guy

I've seen alpha jet ceiling at both 48kft and 50kft, but no spec on the climb rate.

The only time I've watched the Alpha Jet extensively was at the Space Ship One qualification flights. I don't remember it being particularly noisy.

alpha jet at right


All Turbomecca turbines are noteworthy for being noisy. The joint venture with SNECMA didn't quiet them down any. I got to fly one in LeHavre at the 1992 World Aerobatic Championships and I can tell you it is very noisy, particularly in the high frequency range. The climb rate seemed comparable to the 20 series Learjets, which makes sense because the thrust to weight ratios are similar. The engines on the Alpha have slightly more thrust (26 lft more) and it weighs about 600 pounds more at max gross to weight.



posted on Jun, 18 2018 @ 02:14 PM
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Did they catch the Alpha Jet in an Alpha Net?

Maybe someone won an Alpha Bet!
Am I Alpha Yet?

a reply to: Barnalby




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