It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Supreme Court upholds Ohio voter registration purge policy

page: 2
14
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 12:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn

originally posted by: intrepid
And how difficult is it to get back on the rolls? Here you just need to show up to vote with ID and a piece of mail showing your address as well.


Registering to vote or renewing a registration is a very easy process.


in some states...

i am learning that we basically have 50 separate voting systems in the usa..

all are playing by their own rules for the most part

honestly i thought when i made this thread i had a handle on voting laws but i do not think any one person could have a handle on all the laws in all the states




posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 12:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: intrepid
And how difficult is it to get back on the rolls? Here you just need to show up to vote with ID and a piece of mail showing your address as well.


LMGDAO! Here, in America, asking anyone to present their "voter ID" is racist and you're called a horrible bigot if you suggest such voter suppressing actions as expecting voters to actually prove they are legally within their rights to vote in the district they're trying to cast a vote in.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 12:47 PM
link   
a reply to: theantediluvian

If actions like this are viewed to benefit Republicans, one must ask how low your opinion is of the Democrat registered minorities where their abilities to stay registered and take a little bit of personal responsibility for that registration are concerned. This argument has always struck me as being one of extreme condescention and disrespect from those who treat black and Latino voters like children who can't keep up with the paperwork the average conservative seemingly has no problems with...



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 12:52 PM
link   
It's tough to vote if you on the Democratic plantation they have to make it as easy as possible to vote early and often. democrats get upset when people leave the plantation and think on their own.




posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: okrian
I know you must be joking. The bulk of the population only votes in the Presidential elections. I'm going to guess they still care. And it's not up to someone else to make that call.

Then, in general, you aren't really paying attention, because matters that come up for a vote every two years always directly affect the individual living in that voting district--the presidential election, not necessarily.

I think that the point was, and with which I agree, is that it makes sense to send out a reminder after two years, because a lot can happen in that amount of time (people move somewhere else and register there, people die, etc.). If they do not re-register in the span of six years, they're off of the voting roles and can undergo the very simple process of getting back on it the next time that they decide to vote.

In the military, we would call this PMCSing the voter rolls, and it makes absolute sense to do--the voter rolls should be as current as possible, without deceased people and those who have moved away remaining on the rolls for decades.
edit on 11-6-2018 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:06 PM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6

Imagine being in KY...we have to show ID AND we do not have early voting. However do we manage, and with those immense obstacles in place, how did we ever have a previous Democrat governor if such laws only affect liberal voters?

It's all absurdity, but I know that you know that.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:21 PM
link   
a reply to: SlapMonkey

I'd prefer it.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:32 PM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6


If actions like this are viewed to benefit Republicans, one must ask how low your opinion is of the Democrat registered minorities where their abilities to stay registered and take a little bit of personal responsibility for that registration are concerned.


I didn't realize that voting was supposed to be a test of one's commitment to following bureaucratic processes.

Can you imagine if we were discussing making getting a business license less arduous and an argument was "one must ask how low your opinion is of small business owners?"


This argument has always struck me as being one of extreme condescention and disrespect from those who treat black and Latino voters like children who can't keep up with the paperwork the average conservative seemingly has no problems with...


It's about margins. Take my state for instance — most people are registered to vote when they get driver's licenses. If most people register when they get/renew their license, and car ownership and drivers licensing go down with economic standing, then it stands to reason that the poorer a person is, the less likely they are to be a licensed driver, the less likely they are to register through the most common, least involved method.

But lets assume that a person who doesn't drive took the bus and went to register in person or picked a form to register by mail. This person is really motivated to vote in a particular presidential election for whatever reason. Then maybe they go to vote and oops, that polling station they could have walked to has been closed down because Republicans wanted to "cut costs." They don't vote. The next election rolls around and the incumbent seems to be a shoe in and they opt not to vote.

If that's Ohio, boom purged. And if that person doesn't remember *exactly* when they last registered/voted and is not really sure how to find out if they're still registered or not, they might just assume that they are. Until of course they go to the polling station find out that they're not because they were purged. And then, no matter what documentation they have (and they'll probably have less than the average), they're not able to rectify this issue in time to vote because there's no same day registration.

Or maybe they voted but their vote wasn't counted. Maybe they're in some #ty district in Detroit where some clown overstuffed a poorly made bag with paper ballots and the seams split and somebody decides they all have to be thrown out. Now not only did John Q Voter's vote not get counted in one election, he may just find himself removed from the rolls.

I can keep going. The point is that every little bit adds up and when it comes to impediments to voting that have disproportionate impact based on economic standing, the assumption by everyone is that it's an impediment that will effect more prospective Democratic voters than Republican.

It's got nothing to do with thinking that any racial or ethnic group is inherently lazy.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:44 PM
link   
Ohio has had a large number of voter fraud in the 2012 election. Maybe, this was the impetus for this move.

Here in Cincinnati, an election official was convicted of 17 counts of fraud. She was sentenced to 5 years in jail only to serve 5 months. Upon her release, she was met by the one and only Al Sharpton with a big media event. A Catholic Nunn was found guilty and place on home incarceration due to her advanced age. She has been voting for long dead sisters of Mount Saint Joseph Convent. Another woman in the Akron-Canton area was prosecuted for the same thing but I don't know the result.


A county in northern Ohio had more democratic voters the total county population...go figure. In Cleveland, there were several precincts that voted 100% democrat in 2012 with not one republican vote. BTW, Cleveland had a large ACORN activity during that time until it was disbanded (or name changed).


A city councilman stated, on Facebook, that Cincinnati could count on a 80% democrat vote. This seems rather high to me. Perhaps, the woman who went to jail is back at work. BTW, he won reelection.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:48 PM
link   
a reply to: theantediluvian

Suuuuure it doesn't.
*wink wink*
Y'all clearly view them as completely able equals.
*wink wink*

Disgusting



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 01:49 PM
link   
a reply to: howtonhawky




i am learning that we basically have 50 separate voting systems in the usa..

Stop letting your neighbor , who has most likely never voted , teach you US Civics.
That way , you would not be on here posting ignorance.
The Voter Act of 1993 declared States must timely purge their voter registration databases
I am fairly certain , the State or Local Government does not have the time nor manpower to check with every single individual who does not vote to verify they haven't passed away , moved , or have been convicted of a Federal Offense.
Thus the limit of 2 years
If a person hasn't voted in 2 years , they need to be deleted.It only takes a few minutes to register again.

Thus , the liberals who brought this up before the Supreme Court lost , not understanding the law. As usual.
And failing to try to show how much power they have . Epic Failure.


edit on 6/11/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: howtonhawky




i am learning that we basically have 50 separate voting systems in the usa..

Stop letting your neighbor , who has most likely never voted , teach you US Civics.
That way , you would not be on here posting ignorance.
The Voter Act of 1993 declared States must timely purge their voter registration databases
I am fairly certain , the State or Local Government does not have the time nor manpower to check with every single individual who does not vote to verify they haven't passed away , moved , or have been convicted of a Federal Offense.
Thus the limit of 2 years
If a person hasn't voted in 2 years , they need to be deleted.It only takes a few minutes to register again.

Thus , the liberals who brought this up before the Supreme Court lost , not understanding the law. As usual.
And failing to try to show how much power they have . Epic Failure.



perhaps i am having bad day but i sense no connection between the text you quoted and the response you gave

my point is that there are very many differing voting laws across the nation.

that is high contrast to what we the average americans think the voting laws are across different states.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:21 PM
link   
a reply to: howtonhawky

I'm in Ohio, and I have personally witnessed probable voter fraud here, on several occasions. As a First Responder I was on a run for an elderly woman who had fallen on the sidewalk at just after 7 am, on voting day. She was lying stiffly and had abnormal neuro-checks, so we put a c-collar on her and backboarded her.

Just as we got her loaded into the Medic Unit, a young woman...early 20s, it appeared...comes breathlessly running up with a half inch thick sheaf of papers saying, "It's ok! I have her records, and hands it to me.

So, naturally I asked her who she was. She tells me she is the woman's social worker, who is a resident of the Group Home nearby. So, I tell what hospital we are taking her to, so she can meet us there. On the front page...in larger type even...it says that the woman has an IQ of 46.

So on the ride in back, I put a few things together...despite being nicely dressed...like church clothes nice...and looking physically normal...she was laying there looking scared and stiff. So I start talking to her a bit to calm her fear. I told her it was ok to relax now and just breathe. She immediately unclenched and what we had been interpretting as posturing, typical of spinal cord injuries, disappeared.

Then I noticed she was wearing an "I voted!" Sticker on her coat. So I asked her about it. And she got all happy about it, and told us that they all gotten up early to get on the bus to go vote. The same people who had come to the home before to register everyone, took them down to help them vote! She was very proud of it.

I checked later that day and the Group Home was licensed for 35 adult residents. And she had checked out fine at the hospital, with just her skinned knee. I theorized that someone who had seen her fall, had run up to help, and told her not to move or she could be paralyzed...no wonder she was scared and wouldn't respond normally to our testing.

I don't have any idea if that is actually illegal here. But, it was definitely strange. I've also seen a woman filling out a provisional ballot, wearing her scrubs and hospital ID badge, just ahead of me in line, saying she had gotten married, and her new last name didn't match her registration. I also noticed she already had three "I Voted!" stickers on her coat already, getting a 4th one as she left, at about the same time I was.

At any rate, Dayton, Ohio is a mid-size heavily Democrat city...the GOPers mostly live out in the Exburbs...being a swing state, I'm pretty sure there are shenanigans all round, of one type or another. We just passed a bipartisan gerrymandering reform a few weeks ago, by public referendum.
edit on 11-6-2018 by Enderdog because: Y indeed...



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:27 PM
link   
a reply to: howtonhawky




my point is that there are very many differing voting laws across the nation.

Your opinion
"You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to ignorance . " - Harlan Ellison

Now , go seek information .
You will be surprised at the number of States that send voter confirmations out after 2 years of non-voting .
Again , the Voter Act of 1993 declares each State must purge their voter database. The process is not outlined .
And as far as your inability to understand, perhaps that clears it up.
Or not.
If not see the Ellison quote above.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:41 PM
link   
a reply to: Gothmog

And you, like others on the right, seem to support the idea that the state should do their best to keep people from voting, not the opposite, which should be the way in a democratic society.

Also it should worry you that the more you keep people from voting, the better your party does. First sign that you might be falling on the wrong side of history.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: theantediluvian

If most people register when they get/renew their license, and car ownership and drivers licensing go down with economic standing, then it stands to reason that the poorer a person is, the less likely they are to be a licensed driver, the less likely they are to register through the most common, least involved method.

So, if they cannot afford a car anymore, people don't keep their state-issued identifications current? They don't need a valid (current) license/identification for any other day-to-day activity, huh?

Weird...must be a very unique state where, unless someone can own a car and drive, they have no use for a license or a state ID card.


But lets assume that a person who doesn't drive took the bus and went to register in person or picked a form to register by mail. This person is really motivated to vote in a particular presidential election for whatever reason. Then maybe they go to vote and oops, that polling station they could have walked to has been closed down because Republicans wanted to "cut costs." They don't vote. The next election rolls around and the incumbent seems to be a shoe in and they opt not to vote.

Well, if your very unique state where people don't need ID cards for anything is like any other state that I've lived in (three different ones in my life), they would be mailed notification from the board of elections for their county noting the location of their polling station well in advance of actual time to vote.

But in reality, you can make up these hypotheticals all day (which you seem content with doing), but using that to say that states shouldn't be able to responsibly purge voting rolls is logically fallacious and just plain laughable.

Onward, to more hypotheticals...


If that's Ohio, boom purged. And if that person doesn't remember *exactly* when they last registered/voted and is not really sure how to find out if they're still registered or not, they might just assume that they are. Until of course they go to the polling station find out that they're not because they were purged. And then, no matter what documentation they have (and they'll probably have less than the average), they're not able to rectify this issue in time to vote because there's no same day registration.

No, there's no same-day registration because there are provisional ballots in the event that someone who was incapable of registering in time still wants to vote. It's not a perfect scenario, but they do get counted and it stops a person from being unable to vote.

If you're being honest, here, that known ability in every state that I've ever seen negates your hypotheticals outright.


Or maybe they voted but their vote wasn't counted. Maybe they're in some #ty district in Detroit where some clown overstuffed a poorly made bag with paper ballots and the seams split and somebody decides they all have to be thrown out. Now not only did John Q Voter's vote not get counted in one election, he may just find himself removed from the rolls.

Or, like all states, that individual's participation in the election was noted in an official ledger and Mr. Voter signed that ledger to note that he already voted and so that someone else cannot vote using his name. What happens to the ballots afterward doesn't matter in this scenario that you just proposed, because the record of voting happens BEFORE ballots are transferred somewhere to be counted.


I must ask--have you ever voted or looked into the process of casting a vote?


I can keep going.

You could, but really, you shouldn't have started.


It's got nothing to do with thinking that any racial or ethnic group is inherently lazy.

Don't flat-out lie to us--leftists bitch and moan about these laws and how they are going to disenfranchise minority voters and elderly every time that they come up, and I guarantee that it will be on the news tonight. Just turn on CNN or MSNBC later in the evening if you don't believe me.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: okrian
a reply to: Gothmog

And you, like others on the right, seem to support the idea that the state should do their best to keep people from voting, not the opposite, which should be the way in a democratic society.

Also it should worry you that the more you keep people from voting, the better your party does. First sign that you might be falling on the wrong side of history.

How do you know I am on the right ? Or left , or even a Bernie fan ?
Ass-umption. That is a terrible affliction. And one not to show in public.
How do you know I am not just championing ATS' Motto - Deny Ignorance ?
You dont do you
"Some folks , if they dont know , you cant tell them" - Louis Armstrong



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:53 PM
link   
The real question is why do some people support this when it disproportionately disenfranchises voters of a specific political leaning. Its akin to admitting that you would prefer it if those who didn't agree with your political views weren't allowed to vote, or rather had a more difficult time voting. I just can't logic out a reason that doesn't make one sound comically evil.

Either one can admit that they believe those who oppose their own political beliefs are themselves evil and need to be purged (insomuch as it is from voter rolls), and therefore a biased application of rules is acceptable to them, or on the flip side they just don't care so long as they win.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Enderdog

Don't forget these gems from Hamilton County from 2012: Nun & poll worker charged with voter fraud

One guy voted for himself and his dead wife (via absentee ballot...still illegal).

Another was a poll worker who voted illegally four times while working at the polls--all on behalf of Obama, of course. Imagine if the poll worker was helping someone with an IQ of 46 vote--whose vote would it be, really?

The nun also voted via absentee ballot on behalf of a dead nun at the school.

This is JUST Hamilton county, and these are JUST the people who were caught in JUST one single election. But remember, election fraud is not a problem--the mantra of many people who also think that voter ID laws and voter-roll purging is not just unnecessary, but disenfranchises people.

Rrrrriiiiiiigggggghhhhhhttttttt.



posted on Jun, 11 2018 @ 02:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Gothmog




Your opinion


is today idiot day?

there are many differences in the voting laws state by state

that is not opinion

you are just being divisive in every response




top topics



 
14
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join