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Alien Life must exist according to the Laws of Physics

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posted on Jun, 12 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: majickJimi

No, you see, thats where things get tricky.

If you create a physical object with mass, then try to accelerate it to the speed of light, you will reach a point where its energy becomes infinite and that basically means a cataclysmic, explosive end to your experiment, at best. And at no point will that mass carrying object actually cross the threshold of actually arriving at the speed of light, regardless of how hard you push it. Also, its worth pointing out that in order to get the object moving at even a fraction of the desired speed, you would need FANTASTICAL amounts of energy, such that no mechanism exists which could manage it.


Really?!!? I thought my device would reach a state of equilibrium and not be able to accelerate any more due to its lack of energy. So why exactly would it explode?

We are not trying to "exceed" the speed of light, hell, not even reach that speed; besides, it shouldn't be necessary anyway. We only need enough velocity to initiate a useful space-warp. As for the energy to achieve the necessary speed? The US Navy routinely accelerates several pounds to Mach 7 in milliseconds and that is with 20+ year old technology. There are emerging technologies that may provide greater accelerations and velocities in space than is even dreamt of by us.




posted on Jun, 12 2018 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: Maverick7

Very well posted.

Most posters don't realize that the barrier between single and multiple
cellular life is fairly high.. and the barrier between even multicellular
life, and life that can produce enough energy to have any real complexity
is staggering.

I haven't chased down the math, but lets say that 10% of all goldilocks
type planets have one cell life.

It wouldn't surprise me if only 10% of that 10% EVER evolved multicellular
life.

And to make the jump to roughly where we are at, in terms of cellular
energy production, you'd need an event to occur like written about
by this very respected scientist:

en.wikipedia.org...

So lets say that 1 in 1 billion species or less, might ever make the jump
to capture a bacteria and evolve for it to become a mitochondria..

Without something like a mitochondria, complex organic life has no
chance to evolve at all.. or so it seems.

So given this, I find it very likely, that we may be the only organic
life at our level of complexity in this galaxy.. and perhaps in
this quadrant of the Universe.

Someone must have written this topic up somewhere.. it's childishly
obvious.

Kev



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 05:11 AM
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a reply to: majickJimi

A useful space warp cannot be created by the motion of the craft. There are two reasons for this. In order to have a useful space warp, it has to be similar in dimensions to those described in modern thinking on the subject, ergo a kind of warp drive, or what is also known these days as an Albecurrie drive, after the boffin who showed that it would be possible to propel a craft that way, rather than just surmising its practicality as a plot device in a science fiction show.

Otherwise, its more like a cavitation effect, and creating a bubble of warped space that just encompasses the object does nothing for it. The effect needs to be precisely modulated and controlled, not just a result of initial acceleration. Also, there is no reason discussing space warp related propulsion, unless we are looking to reach and indeed EXCEED the speed of light at some point. The reason I say that, is that space is large, and our lifetimes are short, and I for one do not accept the premise that the best we can do, is to accept the limitations of generational ships, where people live and die for hundreds of years, before finally arriving at a destination worth going to.

We can, and must, have a future which contains FAR better turnaround time than that.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 05:15 AM
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Alien Life Yeah!

Go Aliens 'woot'

#GoAliens!

edit on 13-6-2018 by BotheLumberJack because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 05:33 AM
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originally posted by: Akragon
a reply to: neoholographic

The problem is we haven't found it yet, even in the simplest forms...

We've been to all of the planets in the inner solar system, and cruised by the rest...

We have found the "building blocks" of life... but still no actual life...

perhaps fossilized bacteria... maybe

And im sure one day we will find it somewhere... unfortunately thus far, its only here



To be fair, we have only really searched a miniscule area of the solar system. The tiny drillings and scrapings we make with the few landers and probes we have sent out to the various planets and moons have really only tested the equivalent of a childs sandpit in relation to the worlds landmass. Its really not surprising we haven't found life yet.

The recent methane readings from Mars up the ante a considerable amount though. I truly believe its just a dwindling matter of time before we find solid evidence of life on Mars - and once we find that we can pretty much safely assume the rest of the solar system, and beyond, has life too.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: majickJimi

Thank you for your "ETA" I did not bother googling the exact period for when most our tech advancements were made, 100 years seemed like a good guess.

But it is 50 years now according to google, thank you for the meaningful update.

Adios!



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Kryties

Yes from the the human perspective, we've only just started digging. Meanwhile, 13 lightyears from earth there is a planet that is 3 times older than Earth, if you consider this information and the belief in alien life then an alien civilisation may potentially have been digging for several million years.

You'd think we'd have some evidence of contact by now, somewhere in our history, or something we've been monitoring in space for the past 75 years or so.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: ISeekTruth101
a reply to: Kryties

Yes from the the human perspective, we've only just started digging. Meanwhile, 13 lightyears from earth there is a planet that is 3 times older than Earth, if you consider this information and the belief in alien life then an alien civilisation may potentially have been digging for several million years.

You'd think we'd have some evidence of contact by now, somewhere in our history, or something we've been monitoring in space for the past 75 years or so.


Which planet is that?

The only suitable star 13ly from here is Tau Ceti; its two planets are about 1 billion years older than Earth, though, they are not favorably placed within the HZ (like Earth is), thus making the evolution of life a bit more difficult.

On planet is rather close to the star making it a rather hot planet, and the other is at the outer edge of the HZ, making it rather cold. Although both probably have liquid water, and therefore a greater probability of life.

Anyway, just curious about what star you are referring to.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: [post=23483963]KellyPrettyBear[/post
Prokaryote to eukaryote is the issue! Prokaryotes are limited by the energy they make because they are single celled, and chemiosmotic! They are masters at gleaning energy(oxidation/reduction) with a multitude of electron donors and receptors, but not capable of complexity because surface area is relative to volume-their membrane cannot compensate for volume increase, internallizing energy production via mitochondria (a bacterium) is the key! Probably very rare, indeed! I could go on a littany of why a bacteria getting inside an archaea made it happened, but that is a subject of another thread!
However, multi cellular, advanced life is probably a singular event in the history of life on any planet. People need to study the drive/mechanics and energy flow of cells, before they postulate on INTELLIGENT life forms.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 11:29 AM
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Yup. That was my exact point.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: KellyPrettyBear

You, sir, are gentleman and a scholar! However, we disagree on the UFO front, i have no experience, except study for some 40yrs! I truly love your knowledge!



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: HiddenWaters

Ah thanks.

I'm leaving UFOlogy.

The funny thing about "UFOlogy" is there aren't any UFOs..
they are something else entirely.... with one exception.

I originally came from "spirituality".. but left that field, as I was
disgusted with the lies and deception.

I wanted to learn from UFOlogy.. and of course the lies and deception
there are just as bad or worse.

Because they are the same field actually.

I know that various people disagree.. and that is not only OK, but it's
wonderful.

There is quite a learning curve associated with the pursuit of novel
knowledge, and most people are armchair quarterbacks.. but have
never played the game.

Reading silly books, attempting to communicate with "insiders",
whether in UFOlogy or the occult is fairly pointless.. the people
who know do, and the rest go on the lecture circuit.

It's the same as in other fields.

We've never chatted before.. its an honor.

Kev



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: KellyPrettyBear

I will agree with all that you have said, WE will be the UFO'S, however, i still look to the skies, in hopes that some other race figured it out-i dont need a savior, just verification that life exists elsewhere-it seems a " no brainer" to me, but i realize the hurdles!



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: majickJimi

Yes well the planet in question is irrelevant, merely an example of how there are far older celestial bodies nearby than the earth.

For curiosity's sake it's exoplanet candidate Kapteyn b.

I purposely chose a celestial body in our own galaxy so as to hint at the possibility of an alien civilisation far superior to us being a stones throw away from an alien's perspective. Had they been looking, digging and monitoring just like us, we would no doubt have had contact at some point, rather quickly.

In reference to your post which essentially focuses on human space exploration as a measuring stick of progress towards finding alien life in the cosmos... well advanced aliens would have found us quicker with technology that's million's of years beyond humans!



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: KellyPrettyBear
Reading silly books, attempting to communicate with "insiders",
whether in UFOlogy or the occult is fairly pointless.. the people
who know do, and the rest go on the lecture circuit.

Heh. "Those who know, do not say. Those who say, do not know."



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I would, in my thinking, agree with you. A civilasation only a hundred years more advanced than us, might be able to see us, and, at the same time, hide itself, from us. Our own advancement in the last 70 years is proof-that is what i look for! And hold out as a reason to continue the search!



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 01:05 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: KellyPrettyBear
Reading silly books, attempting to communicate with "insiders",
whether in UFOlogy or the occult is fairly pointless.. the people
who know do, and the rest go on the lecture circuit.

Heh. "Those who know, do not say. Those who say, do not know."


Yup.

I've said too much, and now I need to stop talking.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: KellyPrettyBear

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: KellyPrettyBear
Reading silly books, attempting to communicate with "insiders",
whether in UFOlogy or the occult is fairly pointless.. the people
who know do, and the rest go on the lecture circuit.

Heh. "Those who know, do not say. Those who say, do not know."


Yup.

I've said too much, and now I need to stop talking.


Too many people think they know this and know that about unexplained ufos. Truth is, we know nothing, only personal opinions which is not truth.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: Jay-morris
Truth is, we know nothing, only personal opinions which is not truth.

I think there is a kind of truth in subjectivity. A person sees a flying saucer, and it's obvious that it is not a part of our normal reality. There's no way to objectively explain it or prove it. But to that individual, it's the truth. And the only thing we have that really matters is our own point of view.



posted on Jun, 13 2018 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift
That completely depends on who sees it, and what their interpretation is. The point I' m making, is, that if a ruler of some long fogotten country sees it, and says he is god because of it, we have a problem. That is why science reared its ugly head-prove your vision, otherwise I do not have to worship your version of reality!



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