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What are the finest examples of craftsmanship in history??

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posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno


I don't know man my Egyptian granite vase from the old kingdom is pretty nuts..

But yeah those walls are tight.




posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Sure those are odd, but not exactly artisan work..

Take the pyramids.. sure they are engineering marvels, but I’m sure the vast majority of laborers were unskilled labor.


Michaelangelo’s David was a masterpiece with no unskilled laborers.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: luthier

The vases are cool.

Joe Rogan had Robert schock on his latest podcast.. they talk about the vases quite a bit.
edit on 4-6-2018 by JoshuaCox because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: tadaman

But they also took an obscene amount or unskilled labor..

I mean things that took maybe the best craftsman on the planet at the time to make.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:47 PM
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Carlo Crivelli

Your average Picasso is a just a doodle . This however , (first on linked page) is art at its very finest . I'd absolutely recommend seeing this picture up close and it is in Washington National Gallery at the moment . Its extremely hard to replicate this kind of quality in any picture without an actual camera . Crivelli lived in the 1400s , so its absolutely genuine some of his other work is also stunning



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:53 PM
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One thing that mass produced items, done with machines, cannot replicate is the uniqueness of a handcrafted piece of artwork. Anything handmade will always have at the minimum, minor imperfections and differences from another piece made by the same artisan.

And that's a good thing....it makes the pieces more valuable and sought after since those that actually appreciate art seek that which is unique.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

Yeah, don't get me wrong. I'm not saying they "are the best". But just take a look at some of those curved angles.....how the hell did they do that??? Nigh on impossible.....but it happened because we're looking at it.

Just imagine trying to get one stone to fit as tight as it does up against the others? Then think of the amount of shaping required, plus each stone has a beveled / chamfered edge to boot.



All I'm saying is it's bonkers and cannot be and has not been replicated. It fall way deep into the "too hard" basket.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

As an amateur carpenter coming from a line of actual carpenters this might seem a little lame, but I have always had a fascination with the Loretto Staircase since the first time I touched it.




According to a Washington Post column by Tim Carter, "It's a magnificent work of art that humbles me as a master carpenter. To create a staircase like this using modern tools would be a feat. It's mind-boggling to think about constructing such a marvel with crude hand tools, no electricity and minimal resources


Brief blurb about the staircase

Keep in mind when you look at the picture that the railings were added later.

Anyways, that's my vote, for what it is worth.




posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Beautiful



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:11 PM
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I recall that some of the original Roman aqueducts are still in service even today. That argues for some pretty solid construction.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:20 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
I recall that some of the original Roman aqueducts are still in service even today. That argues for some pretty solid construction.


I read a fascinating paper one time about the aqueducts. They were lined with lead. The author of the paper reasoned that one of the reasons of the fall of Rome was the massive amount of lead poisoning that the populace was getting resulted in birth defects, memory loss, the general decline of mental processes that lead poisoning brings on.

Not to derail the thread and my apologies, but I've often wondered if the author of the paper was on to something.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:23 PM
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The Scythian artwork has always amazed me- incredible detail, and done in the 4th century!


Wiki

I've always loved the Parthenon wall friezes too..



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

I don't think it was the aquaducts themselves as it was the plumbing. Wealthier Romans has indoor plumbing that was made of lead. I think they also used lead vessels for their wine. Basically, I think there were some skeleton studies done that showed the wealthier a Roman was, the more lead they tended to have in their skeleton.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I think you are correct, because I remember at the time thinking that it was a form of social Darwinism that the wealthier you were, the more you were poisoning yourself.

Again, sorry to derail the thread...



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: Starcrossd

That is indeed some beautiful craftsmanship!

Thank you for bringing to my attention... sometimes I have blinders on when it comes to history.




Edited to add... why do they have lizard griffons there? WTF?... lol
edit on 4-6-2018 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Lol not really sure! Maybe the artist couldn't decide and chose a more 'dragony' look for the beastie

quite beautiful though

yw, glad you enjoyed it! Fascinating work.

eta; if you click on the pic in the Wiki link you can go full screen and see some more of the details. Really wondrous!
edit on 4-6-2018 by Starcrossd because: added info



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 09:02 PM
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originally posted by: CaptainBeno
Many stone built structures around the world. Cathedrals, Pyramids, odd stone structures we all know and love. However, the oddest and most mysterious of all have to be be the stone walls in Cusco. I still cannot get my head around the precision in which these bad boys have been placed together. Look at the picture below and think about it for a moment. Each stone (Some weighing up to 60 plus tonnes) could not be chipped away at until the fit.

This picture shows Cuzco's famous 12-sided stone. The stones in this wall fit so perfectly, that you couldn't place a coin between them.





You might also check out Hittite stonework. Amongst work not unlike that there, and stuff like plumbing, they drilled big holes thru granite as a routine back in like 1600BC.
edit on 4-6-2018 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 09:05 PM
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The carvings inside Rosslyn Chapel are up near the top of my list.
Particularly the Apprentice's Pillar, as the story goes.....
so fine an example of craftsmanship that it cost the apprentice his life. The master mason returned from a trip and upon discovering who was responsible for the beautiful carving of the pillar, killed the young apprentice for producing something that was so far better than the master mason was capable of.



Apprentice Pillar





posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 09:13 PM
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a reply to: cosmickat

That reminds me of the jain temples in Gujarat India.



They carved from the mountain.


edit on 4-6-2018 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 09:13 PM
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a reply to: cosmickat

Sweet.

That reminds me, the stone temples of India.

There's a whole list of them, but here's a few quickies:


This one the mot impressive, as the dudes carved downwards into the stone ground to make all that that is both open and feature:


Countless tripper heads across like 1000 years to make all them. Heavy duty trippers!



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