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Looking to buy my first handgun and could use some advice

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posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
Go to a gun range where you can rent a gun (if you have them near you) and shoot everything you can afford to.

Then settle on the one that every time you pick it up your hand fits it perfectly, so in the event you really need it you don't have to think about it your hand goes right to where it needs to be.

Excellent first-page advice.

It's really hard to tell someone what to look for, when they are the only one who will know what it is once they've found it.

OP: There are two prevalent styles of handguns out there. The Luger and the Browning. One of the two will fit the way you most naturally hold a firearm when pointing it at a target. You might want to know exactly what I'm talking about before heading out to a shooting facility and sending a bunch of rounds down range.

The advice is this: Don't start adapting to a firearm. Get the one that's natural to your grip. Unlearning something that's been mechanically induced is the most challenging habit to get out of.




posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk




If you're not necessarily looking for a concealed carry pistol (although some do carry them) probably the finest pistol ever developed is the John Moses Browning 1911A1 pistol. As pistols go, the 1911 has no rival. They are, hands down, the best firearm on the planet. There are too many derivatives of the 1911 to go into all of them here, but some superior manufacturers are Springfield, Colt, Wilson Combat among many others. There are also some crap 1911's out there, so know what you're doing before buying one. There is a long list of other .45's out there, but unless you're laser focused on concealed carry the 1911 should fill the top 20 slots for candidates (that's how far superior the 1911 is to any other model).


Thanks! I hadn't even thought of buying the Browning 1911A1 - not sure why as I am a big fan of that model. Probably because I haven't seen or shot with one in quite a while. It was the first handgun my father showed me how to shoot too.

I do like the Barretta though - and it also fits my hand very well.

Two good choices. I think this is what people call a high quality problem.




posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Couple things to remember (aside from expect a very heavy pistol).

Almost 100% of Beretta 92FS's shoot low for most shooters. At distances more than 20 yards it's almost a hold-over. The sight system on a Beretta is different. It is a battle sight system styled after the military Beretta M9, not target, meaning you have to "hold the bull" (and I mean really hold it too!).

Not saying don't get one, I love my 92FS, it's a work of art! However, just know what you're getting into. I changed out my rear sights to adjustable because holding the bull that hard is counter-intuitive for me and I don't like doing it.

Also remember, the 92FS is a full double stack 9 so it has a big mag well and a fat grip. I have big hands so I like a fat grip like that because I get lots of purchase on it, but it can be too big for some people. I think all the 92FS's now come with Hogue grips witch add even more girth to it. I changed mine out to wood (mainly just because I like wood 'furniture' better).

The Beretta 92 is an engineering masterpiece overall. I'm sure you will love it. Just know, you will have to "learn" to shoot it (as all 92 owners quickly find out). It could shoot as much as a foot low at 20 feet when you first get it.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: Riffrafter

Any opinions on lower cost 9mm or .45? Both feel comfortable in my hands...



Big difference between 9mm and a .45. Are you male, .45 is hard on the ladies. 9mm can hold 17+, .45 is 7 or 8, so if you live in CA get the .45 with the 10 bullet mag rule. Go to a range and rent the guns and shoot them. I shoot a Glock 22 .40 that can hold 22 and I bought a Glock 19x 9mm for the wife. I like Glocks, indestructible, never miss fire even if you do not clean it.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk

The Beretta 92 is an engineering masterpiece overall. I'm sure you will love it. Just know, you will have to "learn" to shoot it (as all 92 owners quickly find out). It could shoot as much as a foot low at 20 feet when you first get it.



I actually hated my military Beretta... I had to work hard to get it into the target, just felt bad and hard to shoot. I could shoot my Glock gangsta style and get a tighter pattern...lol



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: Riffrafter

Any opinions on lower cost 9mm or .45? Both feel comfortable in my hands...



Big difference between 9mm and a .45. Are you male, .45 is hard on the ladies. 9mm can hold 17+, .45 is 7 or 8, so if you live in CA get the .45 with the 10 bullet mag rule. Go to a range and rent the guns and shoot them. I shoot a Glock 22 .40 that can hold 22 and I bought a Glock 19x 9mm for the wife. I like Glocks, indestructible, never miss fire even if you do not clean it.


Yes - male. 6'1" - 200 lbs, pretty large hands too so no worries there. As a matter of fact there are handguns that are too small for me to hold/use comfortably and I avoid those.

I've pretty much decided on the Berretta 9mm. I'll have it by the end of the day.

Of course, another friend weighed in and said I might want to consider a .40 too.

sigh...

lol

edit on 6/3/2018 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: Riffrafter


Yes - male. 6'1" - 200 lbs, pretty large hands too so no worries there. As a matter of fact there are handguns that are too small for me to hold/use comfortably and I avoid those.

I've pretty much decided on the Berretta 9mm. I'll have it by the end of the day.

Of course, another friend weighed in and said I might want to consider a .40 too.

sigh...

lol


9mm is now 15 cents a round so 1000 rounds is 150 bucks, not bad, .40 is 19 cents a round and .45 is 21 cents for best prices. This might help you decided too.

I HIGHLY recommend you shoot and compare the Berretta to the Glock, I bet you a beer you pick the Glock...

If you have a Sportsman warehouse near you they actually have good prices.
edit on 3-6-2018 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

.40 is a compromise. A solution to a perceived problem. Don't get one unless you have a very good reason. 9mm or 45 in a striker fired gun. 40 has much more recoil than a 9mm, and is even snappier than .45acp. A good .45acp gun has more of a "push" than a "snap" like a .40 or .357Sig does.

If you get the 92, get it in 9mm. If you get a 1911, get it in 45acp.

With the advent of modern 9mm ammo, there is no reason for 95% of people to consider anything else. This is coming from someone who is a huge fan of .45acp and .357Mag.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero
I HIGHLY recommend you shoot and compare the Berretta to the Glock, I bet you a beer you pick the Glock...

I like the way you put that.

It's pretty obvious to me that Flyingclaydisk definitely knows what he's talking about. Opinions and advice are two different things though.

OP: As a .40 owner/EDC, my best opinion for you is don't go down the middle. Pick the 9mm or the .45.

www.abovetopsecret.com... re-read rule #3.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:06 PM
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Springfield Armory Xd .40 non ported.

Best gun I ever owned. It shot much better thsn my usp 40, which was twice the price.

9's are underpowered and 45's are too jumpy inmo.

The 40 has almost the knockdown of the 45, but it will shoot much faster than a 45 accurately.

It doesn't get the muzzle jump like a 45, so pulls back onto target much faster.

Keep in mind, anything above .22 has a good chance of going through an attacker and not just into them, so you need to watch your backdrop.

A 40/45 can go through a person, then the wall, then your kid, or your neighbors.

Good luck, avoid glock crap



edit on 6 by Mandroid7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
Springfield Armory Xd .40 non ported.

Best gun I ever owned. It shot much better thsn my usp 40, which was twice the price.

9's are underpowered and 45's are too jumpy inmo.

The 40 has almost the knockdown of the 45, but it will shoot much faster than a 45 accurately.

It doesn't get the muzzle jump like a 45, so pulls back onto target much faster.

Keep in mine, anything above .22 has a good chance of going through an attacker and not just into them, so you need to watch your backdrop.

A 40/45 can go through a person, then the wall, then your kid, or your neighbors.





Good point. You may not have the luxury of time to adequately assess things.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Best advice is to go to a store that will allow you to shoot the models you are looking at at their range and they will often put some of the $$ you spend renting the gun towards the purchase. If they don't do that, find a shop that applies your rental fee towards your purchase.

The 45 or 9mm debate is a little tired and there are people who are die-hard supporters of each. There is also the choice of something like a 22 magnum and there is an interesting gun that is extremely light and holds 30 rounds and is extremely controllable with little recoil which can be extremely important when someone is new to shooting. If you can't hit the target it doesn't matter if you have a 9mm, 40 cal, 44 mag, 45 acp or 50 AE. If you are going to flinch when you pull the trigger, you are probably going to have problems hitting a target (or person if in a defensive situation) and using something like a 22 mag you will most likely not have an issue with the flinch making it more likely to place a shot. It is also MUCH less expensive to shoot and experience is the key thing when it comes to accurately using a firearm.

For those who say a 22 can't stop a person they don't know what they are talking about. An AR 15 is a 22 just with a high power rifle cartridge but the same size bullet. For defense, a 22 mag or even long rifle (LR) can be a great option. The thing about a 22 lr or mag is that you are probably not going to be shooting through windshields or doors to stop a person, though a few shots in the same place will penetrate a windshield.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:17 PM
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I always recommend the Beretta 92 series for a first gun if they can handle the grip. Four reasons:

Reliability, because it is not a picky eater. Buying used is a no fear option unless the gun was left in a bucket of saltwater for a year. Which put used in the $350-$500 range depending on cosmetics.
Accuracy, takes a little time to get used to but even my low sight 92 S is very good. Maybe even better than the M9 is.
Ease of Use, all of mine are used and I can just about rack the slide with left pinky wrapped against my palm. Recoil is absorbed well by he weight.
Ease of breakdown, which really the most important reason for first timers. Break down cleaning and reassembly is absolutely the easiest on the 92.

Yeah I do have a bias because I own a few, darn collecting habits and wanting each model. While do like the 1911. Even I don’t like the breakdown. And no idiot marks on the pony so far. But if you need any nudge towards the 92, This uses the same magazines and is boringly accurate even at range. Put 4 out of 5 on a cigarette pack at 150 feet first time I shot it. Honestly I thought they were all misses until I walked up.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Secret Service carries FN Five Sevens. And I have never seen one for sale used if that says anything.
edit on 4-6-2018 by Ahabstar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:23 PM
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Personally, I think hanguns are lame for anything other than ccp.

I'd go with a Tavor, or Benelli riot shotgun for home defense.

They are much easier to aim in a high stress situation.




posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:29 PM
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9mm isn't "underpowered", ALL handgun cartridges are underpowered.

"Knockdown" is a myth. It is common for a shooting victim to not immediately realize they are shot, especially if they are actively attacking the shooter. The only surefire way to stop a threat is a direct hit to the brain or spinal cord. A direct hit to the heart still leaves an attacker enough time to cause damage. It takes time to bleed out. This is why multiple hits to vital organs with lots of blood supply is important. The bigger the hole, the quicker the blood comes out. The more holes, the quicker the blood comes out. Shot placement is king, no matter the caliber. You cannot miss fast enough to win a gunfight. Modern bullet design makes the caliber war moot for handguns.

Every striker fired .45 I have ever shot has less felt recoil and muzzle flip than striker fired .40. A 1911 has even less. Bullet design affects whether or not a bullet penetrates through the target. There are no guarantees. It is dependent upon shot placement and bullet design. You shouldn't be using ball ammo for self defense unless you're using a 1911 chambered in .45acp.

.22lr will definitely kill a human. How quickly depends on shot placement. Do you really want to gamble that a .224" projectile will cause enough damage to induce unconciousness, or would a .355" or .451" hollowpoint that expands larger be a better option?

.22lr and .223Rem ( 5.56x45mm ) may be the same size, but the bullet design and kinetic energy are night and day.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 01:39 PM
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An oft overlooked but very high quality "browning style" 9 mm is CZ-75B - very ergonomic grip, accurate for a semi-auto pistol and made to last.

Not one single jam or misfire in 12 years I've owned one - it'll feed anything put in it!

Its noticeably heavier than my glock - 17 but is more controllable during repeated firing due less recoil.

Remember a pistol is used to buy time to get to your long gun!



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter
Well first of all, your first gun will not be your last, period. So I recommend start cheap so that you become comfortable with even handling the equipment on a day to day basis. Hi-Point, which every gun person here is going to spit in my face for even writing out the name, is quite an affordable and reliable piece of equipment. They are not the best for conceal carry, but I am guessing that you likely won't be doing a daily conceal carry yet until you become more comfortable with the daily handling and care of a firearm to begin with.

Hi-Point firearms start at about $180-$250 and they have 9mm, .40, and .45 available from your selection desire. I have used their Hi-Point .45 before. It is heavy and bulky, but it gets the job done. Not only that, due to the weight of the slide it was alot easier for me to zero back in and keep the grouping together than other slimmer and lighter designs. I consider the Hi-Point an excellent night table, drawer gun as a quick go to iffin you hear something go bump in the night at home when you know there should not be.

For conceal carry, because of the fact you are carrying it for to implicit purpose of saving your life within seconds of needing it, I would go with a revolver, .357 if possible. Most 357 mags can be shot with cheaper .38spec for target practice or fun.
edit on 6-3-2018 by worldstarcountry because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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The Springfield is a great gun for 9mm

The G19 is a standard that just works. (Glock 19)

If you are going to carry, i'd go for lower profile. But just to have one...nothing wrong with a Glock. Nothing wrong with a Springfield. Just avoid names like HiPoint and you will be OK.

Side Note: Taurus makes lower cost handguns that are effective. The difference is the finish. The slide may have some sharper edges. But nothing wrong with a Taurus. I have a couple (a smaller .40 for personal carry, and a 9mm that compares to the G19). You wouldn't do too bad to buy a Taurus to save a few bucks...they are decent guns for the price point.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

Problem with a 40 for home defense is when you miss, the neighbors get hit.

9mm is perfectly effective to bring someone down when hit within 20ft, and won't kill the neighbors kids on accident while saving your own hide.




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