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Looking to buy my first handgun and could use some advice

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posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:17 AM
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For shooting at targets, a simple 22 pistol is cheap to shoot. It is a good starter pistol. Now for protection, a little bigger gun packs more wallop, but practicing with it is expensive.

I have a 357 desert eagle, and I can go through a box of shells in a half hour practicing with it, that is about thirty seven bucks an hour to shoot it. In contrast, if I shoot the twenty two it costs about six bucks an hour to shoot a hundred shells an hour.

A good 22 is just as good for protection as a bigger gun most times. a 22 will kill a deer if you hit it correctly.




posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:21 AM
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I picked up a ruger 1911 commander from the BX in Oklahoma that I love, fits my hand like a glove, so far has been extremely reliable and I have shot it in less than optimal conditions on occasion.

But like everyone has said, finding what works best for you the shooter is most important.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

.357 DE...now there's a hammer! How much does that thing weigh?

I think the .44's weigh something like 4+ lbs. empty. Add in a full mag and you're pushing 5.

Nice pistol though!

ETA...Will it cycle with .38 Spc.?


edit on 6/3/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

I bought my lady a sweet little Baby Glock for our anniversary. Just a hopeless romantic....
edit on 3-6-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I agree with a .22lr being cheap and easy to shoot with. I have several rifles and pistols chambered in .22lr. I use them myself regularly and when introducing new shooters to guns, they're the go-to.

However, given the amount of skill needed to use one for self-defense or hunting, I would never recommend it. Yes it can be effective, but that doesn't mean it should be used if there are other options available.

The last thing you need is to fail to stop a threat or cause an animal undue suffering because you used the wrong round for the job.

I reload .357 and .45. Once you get past the initial investment, it pays for itself. I shoot more .357 mag than anything else.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 09:45 AM
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Looking to buy my first handgun and could use some advice


Get one that snips off the hoplophobes.

Black scary looking and high capacity magazine then get another 'weapon' they call a silencer.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Most gun fights are less than 50 feet and for self defense.

Go hammerless!

Small, compact, .357 minimum. Pull it out and pull the trigger....done.

Go with Smith & Wesson M&P 640 or Ruger LCR.

Can you kill a human if you need to?
edit on 3-6-2018 by DeathSlayer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 10:23 AM
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Rules for buying guns:

1. Have a clear purpose for what role you intend to have this gun fill. Is it for home defense? Concealed Carry? Range time?

2. When it comes to guns, you get what you pay for. If you're price tag shy with standard grade guns like Glock then you need to reevaluate a few priorities depending on what you decided was the answer to number 1.

3. Try before you buy. Go online and make a list of guns you want to try. Head over to your local gun shop/range and try them out. See how they feel.

4. Pay for training.

5. Go and get training.

6. Any time you make a change to a pistol, get a new gun, get new sights, a new holster, try out new ammunition, or do anything involving a gun, then you need to go get training.

(Personal preference note) Recoil is a thing. A .45ACP is a decent round but requires a heavier gun and more recoil mitigation training than a 9mm. I've carried both and preferred the accuracy and manageability of the 9mm.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 10:41 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: rickymouse

.357 DE...now there's a hammer! How much does that thing weigh?

I think the .44's weigh something like 4+ lbs. empty. Add in a full mag and you're pushing 5.

Nice pistol though!

ETA...Will it cycle with .38 Spc.?


There isn't much weight difference between the 44 and 357. The barrel is fairly long and I can get a decent pattern at a hundred yards. I have to lean against something to get that pattern though. I do not spread out my legs to get stability. The gun is finicky though, it needs good quality shells, the cheap ones do not chamber and it does not shoot 38s. Even with the heavy weight shooting one handed the gun twists so the casings fly back just on side of my right shoulder, so you can't have anyone standing behind you on the right side.

Nice gun, I paid just over five hundred for it back many years ago, now they are in the thirteen hundred range. Good investment I suppose. In one minute you can empty a clip shooting bowling pins. it is nothing to go out shooting and go through eighteen bucks of ammo in ten minutes.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 10:45 AM
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originally posted by: cynicalheathen
a reply to: rickymouse

I agree with a .22lr being cheap and easy to shoot with. I have several rifles and pistols chambered in .22lr. I use them myself regularly and when introducing new shooters to guns, they're the go-to.

However, given the amount of skill needed to use one for self-defense or hunting, I would never recommend it. Yes it can be effective, but that doesn't mean it should be used if there are other options available.

The last thing you need is to fail to stop a threat or cause an animal undue suffering because you used the wrong round for the job.

I reload .357 and .45. Once you get past the initial investment, it pays for itself. I shoot more .357 mag than anything else.


I thought about getting the reloading equipment for 357s, but I do not shoot enough to justify that. I used to belong to the rod and gun club, but mostly just to go down there and have coffee or a beer and for the picnics and wild game feed. I let my membership go a year and a half ago, It is getting expensive to belong to it, about seventy bucks a year for membership. It is right across the road from me. When I was younger I used the facilities and fished on the stream and beaver dam out back on their hundred twenty acres.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 10:58 AM
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Lots of good advice you have already.Stick with S&W,Springfield,Ruger,or Colt and its 99% sure to be good quality.If you want to spend a bit more,Kimber,Wilson arms and Les Baer are really nice.Semi-auto or revolver is a personal preference,either is fine as long as you are happy with it.I`d go with a .40 or .45,had a .9 and it was ok,but like .45 better.Safety is your main responsibility.And joining the NRA will give you access many safety and training programs besides insurance on your gun.Besides being a royal pain to the anti gun crowd.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 11:03 AM
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Anyone want to share their thoughts on the CZ P-07 9 mm as a first gun? Thanks!



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Good to a gun rage and they a few out until you find one that you like.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: ATSAlex

CZ's, just about every one of them, are absolute engineering and firearms masterpieces!

You will never regret buying a CZ...ever!

Excellent choice!





posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Whoisjohngalt
a reply to: Riffrafter

1. Are you planning on carrying it with you? If so, how would you carry it?
2. What are you looking to spend?
3. What do you think you might be shooting with it? (Boar, mountain lion, human, bear?)


Excellent questions!

I'm not looking to carry at this point, but I may in the future as the laws about carrying are also very loose here.

I'm flexible on what I will spend. If I find the right gun, price probably won't be a driver in the decision.

I'm not going to hunt with it. I'll shoot it at the range and use it for protection in the case of a deadly force emergency.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:12 PM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: Riffrafter

You're early, the US gun guys aren't online yet.

Looks like the Springfield and the Smith & Wesson 9mm are the most recommended starter handguns.

Still minimum $500 brand new, but an easy $100 less than Glocks. Kahr CM9 is budget and well-respected if you like a very small 9mm.

If I lived in the US, I'd probably go for the Springfield and aim to get the CCW permit. Apparently not in VA though, right?


The CCW permit isn't really hard in VA but you do have to meet certain requirements.

VA is an open carry state. From the VA gov website:

"Open carry of a handgun without a permit is legal in Virginia at age 18, withstanding other applicable laws"



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

How much would a used Springfield cost in VA? Do hanguns lose much value when they've been well looked after?


Not sure but I can easily find out.

One thing that surprised me a little is that the largest retailer of handguns by # of guns sold are pawn shops in VA. I have 2 very good pawn shops in Charlottesville. One carries and sells so many handguns they opened a completely separate location that is larger than their main location and all they sell are used guns. Hand guns mostly....

I'm planning on buying it there as I've already visited once and they seem like terrific and very knowledgeable people.

Thanks for your reply!



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: Riffrafter

If I had to recommend someone a first firearm I'd probably suggest the Smith and Wesson M&P or Baretta 92fs. Though the Baretta will be the best for a beginner it's highly reliable and acurate. You wont deal with jamming nearly as often and safety features are great for someone buying their first pistol. All around you'll enjoy taking it to the range. I carry the baretta or a walther ppk. The walther is just easy to conceal even with just short and shorts. The Baretta is great for winter when you wear jackets to help hide it.


Thanks!

Yes, I am leaning heavily towards the Barreta myself.

I'll probably pick it up this afternoon as the store I want to buy it from has one...but only one.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: ridgerunner

Kimbers have a lot of QC problems now, I'd recommend a first purchase elsewhere. And no way does Kimber belong in the ranks of Wilson Combat and Les Baer.

I've got a Kimber Custom we call the "mystery gun". Every time at the range is a surprise. It'll shoot fine for a while, then wild. Other times you'll swear the sights are messed up, then it will start shooting perfectly. I've had it in to Kimber, they can't find anything wrong with it. I've had a world class 1911 armorer (who custom makes 1911's for championship shooters) look at it, and not even he can find anything wrong with it. I'm sure we could fix it eventually after replacing enough stuff, but that model really isn't worth performing that level of surgery on.



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 12:24 PM
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Like many have said it is a personal choice. I have an assortment of handguns for different circumstances. ie; target shooting, home defense, concealed carry. I personally carry a Walther PPK which I find easy to conceal comfortably. It takes a .380 acp caliber. Well made gun with nice safety features. Make a few trips to gun dealers and get a feel for what works for you. Don't cheap out. I paid $430 for the PPK. I believe for the quality of the gun that is an excellent price.



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