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STOP with the COMMON SENSE gun control pleas – just STOP! - falling on deaf ears

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posted on Jun, 5 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

It's unfortunate that we have to implement such security measures. Our children should be able to attend school in blissful ignorance of the violence outside of the doors of their schoolhouse. They shouldn't have to fear for their lives, they should be able to concentrate on learning and enjoy socializing with their peers. Their public school experience should be as carefree as mine.

By the time I was in 2nd grade, I could walk alone the 4 blocks to home from my elementary school. When I was in high school, it wasn't unusual to see some of the country boys coming to school with high power rifles in the window racks of their trucks; ready to go hunting as soon as the final bell rang. We even carried toy guns around with us at one point when we were playing the assassination game. Although, to be honest, that game did finally get banned.

But even then, things were starting to change. After I graduated, the kids starting getting more violent in our schools. At one point there was a big group fight that resulted in several students being expelled. On the national stage, the Columbine school massacre happened less than 20 years later.

Changing times. Every facet of our society is changing faster than at any other time in our nation's history. So, while I wish that children could maintain their innocence, and be intrinsically protected from harm just by virtue of being so innocent, that is not the reality of the 21st century. Our children are already having to face the harsh truths of reality much earlier than we did. High speed Internet and 200+ TV channels of entertainment, information, and news has exposed them to things we didn't even know existed when we were their age. Not to mention learning about concepts that didn't even exist when I was a child.



If a teacher with proper training/background checks has a gun in his/her locked desk drawer, what does it hurt? Nothing. It's an inanimate object. What does it help? Maybe nothing, but then again, maybe it makes the decision between one shooter dead or 17 innocent children dead. If I go to school to see my kid over something, what does it detract from my day to wait until my turn and have an armed security guard escorting me? Nothing. It's a minuscule price to pay to ensure the school is safe. If a kid has to pass through a metal detector and have backpacks x-rayed when they go to school, what does that really hurt? It's an inconvenience.


There is an obvious precedent for implementing stricter security measures when changes in our society dictate them: airport security. After incidents like the DB Cooper hijacking in the early 1970s, stronger security measures began to be put in place. By 1974, metal detectors and X-ray machines were required by law to be installed at all airports. It was an inconvenience, but travelers understood the need for those measures. Of course since 9/11 that inconvenience has multiplied manyfold.

So, what you have proposed seems to be completely reasonable given the current state of our society. I doubt our children will be much phased by the implementation of these measure. I'm sure I'll be more traumatized than them. But, in a few years, when I walk my granddaughter to school, I'll feel considerably more comfortable leaving her in the hands of her teachers knowing that she's protected in a fortress built to keep out the evils of the world that just didn't exist when I was her age.

-dex




posted on Jun, 6 2018 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: yuppa

"They" can do whatever "they" want; my position will not change. There are certain common sense restrictions I can go along with, but going back to my example of negotiating to buy a car above, as long as they are offering 10 cents, I'm not cutting off the $10,000 asking price. As with any deal, even if "they" want to stat making serious offers, there is a line in my mind that I will not cross. If that means no deal, it means no deal; I can still lobby for that nuke-tipped ICBM in my back yard.

TheRedneck



posted on Jun, 6 2018 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

In reality, security need not be that intrusive. A chain-link fence surrounding the school; restricting entry to one or two doors, each equipped with a metal detector; after-hours entry/exit highly restricted. Maybe a school-issued unique ID card that would speed up the entry process; if lost, the child would have to get a new one, which would teach personal responsibility, and the old one could be deactivated immediately (and an alert would indicate if it was used that day already).

If you will notice, most of the larger shootings are not from currently-enrolled students arriving on time. It is from former students, late arrivals, or outside influences.

Anything that did get through would have to face armed security officers, preferably those who have a personality conducive to the school environment. They could act like the old coaches form my day: gruff, tough, no-nonsense, but at the same time understanding of the fact they are dealing with children and they cannot treat them like hardened criminals... unless required. Add in the fact that some faculty would be armed as well and trained in how to handle a potential shooting, and you have multiple layers of protection with a minimum of intrusion into the learning environment.

I would hazard to say that some parents would be the biggest issue at first, as parents tend to be overly protective at times to the point of jeopardizing the effectiveness of their protection. But that will pass soon enough; it always does.


But, in a few years, when I walk my granddaughter to school, I'll feel considerably more comfortable leaving her in the hands of her teachers knowing that she's protected in a fortress built to keep out the evils of the world that just didn't exist when I was her age.

Agreed. The real trick will be to hire the right people to handle the security. We saw all too well what the results of having the wrong people in security were in Parkland, FL, when the very guy who was paid to protect the children wound up cowering outside while his charges were gunned down without mercy feet from his position.

Such is at least as dangerous to the safety of our children as the gunman himself. As far as I am concerned, he should be setting in the cell next to the gunman.

TheRedneck



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