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Canada to hit U.S. with retaliatory tariffs in response to Trump’s steel tariffs

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posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: Gothmog
What comes out of Canada ?
As long as it doesnt interfere with the bacon


2x4's and lumber. So housing cost.

The US doesnt have enough 2x4s internal ?
I have never seen a 2x4 stamped with made in Canada.




posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:32 PM
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NAFTA and GAT were horrible trade deals for the US. It paved the way for corporations to leave the US to manufacture products in Mexico and Canada. This was spearheaded by Bill Clinton administration and the CFR and Trilateral Commission. This was the initial push that was the start of the American Union that TPTB want. So renegotiating it for the US to get a fair shake and to help bring back manufacturing is a good thing. Those even with modernization will greatly help bring the American economy. We cannot help others if we cannot help ourselves first.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: burdman30ott6

Oh ok. So because they make a few cars here I should welcome tariff's on Ford and Chevy and other American products ?


I'm not following the question here. I'm suggesting any recipient nation should "welcome" tariffs per se, I'm saying they're a part of a sound nationally protective fiscal policy. In the same vein, I wouldn't expect anyone to "welcome" income taxation... but accepting that it's not only needed, but needs to be applied to 100% of earners in some manner isn't the same as "welcoming" it. You have to break some eggs to make an ommlette.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: Gothmog
What comes out of Canada ?
As long as it doesnt interfere with the bacon


2x4's and lumber. So housing cost.


Nah, a simple federal regulatory change opening up the domestic timber industry and eliminating the ridiculously strict and foolish roadblocks to fully benefit from the US' forestry resources solves that issue fully.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: peck420

How is bringing down the US's economy going to make all three stronger? It doesn't it brings Canada and Mexico up at the cost of American jobs, standard of living. The US never truly benefited from NAFTA or GAT. It was created to bring the US down, to force the US/Canada/Mexico to merge to survive. That should not be acceptable to any parties.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: rigel4

Actually that is incorrect. The United States is the ONLY nation in the world that can go at it on our own. The US has the resources, the military strength, and relative isolation to ignore the rest of the world and do our own thing. Even worst case scenario and the rest of the world decides to use military force against us, we could actually win a defensive war. No other nation on earth can actually say that and be able to pull it off. I am in great support of the US moving to an isolationist stance, considering everyone always bashes and or hates the US,except when they need something, which is usually military aid.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: luthier

Free markets only work if you really let markets be free. You cant have one country place tariff's and another that doesnt and claim its a free market.

Besides, America is mixed capitalism, havent been a "free market" for a very long time now.


Nor is gov't subsidies by foreign nations 'free market' either. Tariffs is one way to force negotiations or at least offset the subsidies by gov'ts.


It's also a proven way to raise prices.


So what?? If those higher prices gives better jobs at higher wages then they can afford the higher prices. I' for one, am willing to pay higher prices IF that profit benefits the nation, overall.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: peck420

I suggest you read the 1000+ piece of # treaty known as NAFTA before you try to even begin to argue the merits of that worthless #ing thing. It screwed the US over, period. It allowed the loop holes for American corporations to build factories elsewhere use, for all intents and purposes, "slave labor" to avoid putting Americans to work. Read the damn thing, it is utter crap of a document, and before you ask, yes I HAVE read the whole damn thing, and still have the copies of it.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:02 PM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: luthier

Free markets only work if you really let markets be free. You cant have one country place tariff's and another that doesnt and claim its a free market.

Besides, America is mixed capitalism, havent been a "free market" for a very long time now.


Nor is gov't subsidies by foreign nations 'free market' either. Tariffs is one way to force negotiations or at least offset the subsidies by gov'ts.


It's also a proven way to raise prices.


So what?? If those higher prices gives better jobs at higher wages then they can afford the higher prices. I' for one, am willing to pay higher prices IF that profit benefits the nation, overall.


Kind of like raising minum wage right?

Ah no. It raises prices.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:02 PM
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originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: HanSolo31

So taxes and market interference are suddenly conservative?


Are you aware bmw's are also made in the US?



Yes they are. it is a complicating factor. Fines for violating the sanctions are an option.


Nothing complicated. We have high unemployment and are not hurting to export goods we don't even make...

What you have done is bought into rhetoric.


Now you contradict yourself. You just posted the unemployment was down, now it's high. I don't buy your rhetoric, at least on this. I suspect a vested interest on your part. There is a segment within the U.S. that has profited by the external manufacturing growth. Leveling the playing field is met with resistance from those.

I have none. Except the long term health of U.S. manufacturing and their jobs for our citizens.

If you personally are hurt by this, I sympathize. I believe it's the only way to even partially correct this situation. You still haven't offered up any alternative solution, either, I would add.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: luthier

No. This only means that we own the reserve currency and thus everything is priced in dollars. We have phony paper wealth and are living on steam of our grandparents productivity. Wages have been stagnant for years even according to fixed fed figures, while prices of everything rose significantly. Please show me how much higher our wages are. 1% own the majority of the wealth in America, and savings are at a all time low while borrowing and credit consumption are at all time highs.

Please research.


That is quite a rant.

Too bad it makes no sense.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: HanSolo31

So taxes and market interference are suddenly conservative?


Are you aware bmw's are also made in the US?



Yes they are. it is a complicating factor. Fines for violating the sanctions are an option.


Nothing complicated. We have high unemployment and are not hurting to export goods we don't even make...

What you have done is bought into rhetoric.


Now you contradict yourself. You just posted the unemployment was down, now it's high. I don't buy your rhetoric, at least on this. I suspect a vested interest on your part. There is a segment within the U.S. that has profited by the external manufacturing growth. Leveling the playing field is met with resistance from those.

I have none. Except the long term health of U.S. manufacturing and their jobs for our citizens.

If you personally are hurt by this, I sympathize. I believe it's the only way to even partially correct this situation. You still haven't offered up any alternative solution, either, I would add.


It was a typo. We have high employment.

You don't have to buy my rhetoric. There are very few people who believe in high tariff being good for the market. Certainly no free market economists.


Tariff is tax. It's a double tax. One on cost two on jobs.

Farmers suffer. That is one of our main export.

We are a service industry. That is a good thing not a bad thing.

Manufacturing with human beings is not coming back to the us.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:07 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: Gothmog
What comes out of Canada ?
As long as it doesnt interfere with the bacon


2x4's and lumber. So housing cost.


Nah, a simple federal regulatory change opening up the domestic timber industry and eliminating the ridiculously strict and foolish roadblocks to fully benefit from the US' forestry resources solves that issue fully.


It's not so simple. Nor would it be a fast fix.

Unless of coarse we import labor.

Besides that is congresses job not the president.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: burdman30ott6

Oh ok. So because they make a few cars here I should welcome tariff's on Ford and Chevy and other American products ?


I'm not following the question here. I'm suggesting any recipient nation should "welcome" tariffs per se, I'm saying they're a part of a sound nationally protective fiscal policy. In the same vein, I wouldn't expect anyone to "welcome" income taxation... but accepting that it's not only needed, but needs to be applied to 100% of earners in some manner isn't the same as "welcoming" it. You have to break some eggs to make an ommlette.


Tariffs are a liberal isolationist policy not a free market policy. They are similar to labor unions in concept.

My lord folks tariffs are not a conservative policy.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:12 PM
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Proponents of the concept of free market contrast it with a regulated market, in which a government intervenes in supply and demand through various methods such as tariffs used to restrict trade and protect the economy. ... Free markets as a verb phrase, rather than free markets as a noun phrase.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: HanSolo31

So taxes and market interference are suddenly conservative?


Are you aware bmw's are also made in the US?



Yes they are. it is a complicating factor. Fines for violating the sanctions are an option.


Nothing complicated. We have high unemployment and are not hurting to export goods we don't even make...

What you have done is bought into rhetoric.


Now you contradict yourself. You just posted the unemployment was down, now it's high. I don't buy your rhetoric, at least on this. I suspect a vested interest on your part. There is a segment within the U.S. that has profited by the external manufacturing growth. Leveling the playing field is met with resistance from those.

I have none. Except the long term health of U.S. manufacturing and their jobs for our citizens.

If you personally are hurt by this, I sympathize. I believe it's the only way to even partially correct this situation. You still haven't offered up any alternative solution, either, I would add.


A solution for what?????

We have high employment.

Where is the problem, that we have a huge amount of products to choose from?



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: peck420

originally posted by: toysforadults
do we need to import or can we import?

Sorry, read that wrong.

We import what we don't make internally, and I don't see that changing any time soon. So, for certain types, we need to import.


Since we're no longer a manufacturing nation, what do we export?

Curious.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: peck420

originally posted by: toysforadults
do we need to import or can we import?

Sorry, read that wrong.

We import what we don't make internally, and I don't see that changing any time soon. So, for certain types, we need to import.


Since we're no longer a manufacturing nation, what do we export?

Curious.


Food. The same people who will get screwed here. Or the rest of us will supplement their losses.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 08:01 PM
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originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: nwtrucker

originally posted by: HanSolo31
a reply to: luthier

Free markets only work if you really let markets be free. You cant have one country place tariff's and another that doesnt and claim its a free market.

Besides, America is mixed capitalism, havent been a "free market" for a very long time now.


AND wages. Both within that specific industry and movement from the service industry to industrial.



Nor is gov't subsidies by foreign nations 'free market' either. Tariffs is one way to force negotiations or at least offset the subsidies by gov'ts.


It's also a proven way to raise prices.


So what?? If those higher prices gives better jobs at higher wages then they can afford the higher prices. I' for one, am willing to pay higher prices IF that profit benefits the nation, overall.


Kind of like raising minum wage right?

Ah no. It raises prices.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 08:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: luthier

originally posted by: Gothmog
What comes out of Canada ?
As long as it doesnt interfere with the bacon


2x4's and lumber. So housing cost.


Nah, a simple federal regulatory change opening up the domestic timber industry and eliminating the ridiculously strict and foolish roadblocks to fully benefit from the US' forestry resources solves that issue fully.


It's not so simple. Nor would it be a fast fix.

Unless of coarse we import labor.

Besides that is congresses job not the president.


Pacific Northwest has all the labor needed to quickly hit the ground running. Obama reinstated logging limits in the west and that action left a hell of a lot of skilled lumberjacks without jobs in the logging industry or even having to work in Canada under visas. Removal of those limits alongside a quick revision of the various agency approvals currently required to start cutting would pay dividends within 3 months.



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