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Nipah Outbreak: More Than A Dozen Dead, Health Officials Warn It Could Cause Global Epidemic

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posted on May, 28 2018 @ 10:28 PM
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Another possible outbreak of a major virus. The World Health Organization says the Nipah spreading through a state in southwest India could cause a global epidemic. Not familiar with this one. Will have to research to see if it is airborne.

news.sky.com...



At least 13 people have died in India after an outbreak of a rare disease that health officials warn could cause a global epidemic.

Emergency measures have been imposed across the southwestern state of Kerala following the emergence of the nipah virus, which causes flu-like symptoms leading to an agonising brain-swelling condition known as encephalitis.

Those afflicted by the disease, which has a mortality rate of 70% and has no vaccine, can also be sent in to a coma.

Health experts have been flown over to help contain the virus, which is listed alongside ebola and zika as one of eight priority diseases the World Health Organisation believes could cause a global epidemic.

Local media reports that close to 200 patients in Kozhikode and Malappuram are receiving hospital treatment, with 26 under observation and three under intensive treatment.


Update:
www.sciencenews.org...




Nipah is on the World Health Organization’s priority list of emerging diseases that could cause a global pandemic, alongside Zika and Ebola.

Virologists who have studied Nipah’s behavior in animals think that in humans, it initially targets the respiratory system before spreading to the nervous system and brain. Most patients who die succumb to an inflammation of blood vessels and a swelling of the brain that occurs in the later stages of the disease.

Bats can also transmit Nipah to pigs and other livestock, which can then pass the infection onto humans. And humans can spread the virus through saliva and possibly other bodily fluids. One victim in the latest outbreak was a 31-year-old nurse who had been treating Nipah patients.


edit on 28-5-2018 by infolurker because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 28 2018 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: infolurker



All animal samples, including those from bats, cattle, goats and pigs from Kerala, sent to the National Institute of High Security Animal Diseases, in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, were negative for Nipah, said animal husbandry officer A. Mohandas.

The department was now collecting samples of fruit bats from Perambra, the suspected epicentre of the infection and nearby areas, Mohandas said.

Separately, tests run on dead bats in Himachal Pradesh were negative for Nipah, an official there said.

The dead bats were discovered on the roof of a school and had triggered a new Nipah scare last week.


link


Nipah virus was identified in 1998, when it caused an outbreak of neurological and respiratory disease on pig farms in peninsular Malaysia, resulting in 257 human cases, including 105 human deaths and the culling of one million pigs.[17][125] In Singapore, 11 cases, including one death, occurred in abattoir workers exposed to pigs imported from the affected Malaysian farms. The Nipah virus has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a Category C agent.[126] The name "Nipah" refers to the place, Kampung Baru Sungai Nipah in Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan, the source of the human case from which Nipah virus was first isolated.[127][128]

en.wikipedia

Color me cynical but the next question is where are US labs located?



posted on May, 28 2018 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

This must be due to all those gay bombs being planted by the deep state.......



posted on May, 28 2018 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: Allaroundyou
a reply to: infolurker

This must be due to all those gay bombs being planted by the deep state.......



I think it's another test for the population control scheme by the powers that be.

Zika was just the tip of the iceberg...



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: infolurker

It doesn’t appear to be an airborne virus. However, it appears to by mutating at an extremely rapid pace. Considering that the disease was not identified in 1998, by 2005 acute respiratory complications that had not been seen in human cases started becoming prevalent so it’s very likely that it was, in those cases at least, transmitted via droplet dispersal. In other words, sneezing aided in spreading a deadly virus with high mortality rates. Further videnfe if this came in 2005 when 12 people were infected by drinking date palm juice tainted with the saliva or feces of fruit bats. Oh yeah... 11 of those 12 died.

Going back a little, there were a number of outbreaks in Bengal and Eastern India in 2001,2003 and 2004 and the timing seems to indicate that it is seasonal and the majority of people who contracted the disease did so from direct contact and were health care providers in the hospitals treating the initial wave of patients and the family/friends who visited the patients in the hospital.

It ha a mortality rate that aside from a few outbreaks, givers at 67% I’m not sure what oritectivenoriticols were in place at the hospitals where health care workers and visitors also caught Nipa but in 2004 a rickshaw driver who transported a patient to the hospital also became ill and that would indicate a very small window of contact was all that was necessary to transmit the virus from one individual to the next. That’s a little frightening to me and explains why the WHO and CDC have listed it as a category 3 virus meaning it has high potential for use as a biological agent because of its high mortality and the potential for worldwide endemic because in 2009, RNA sequences of three novel viruses in phylogenetic relationship to known henipaviruses were detected in African straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) in Ghana. It was the first time a phylogenetic relationship, which shows how far the virus can potentially spread, was discovered outside of Asia and Australia. There are still so many unknowns regarding this class of viruses that to me at least; it’s a far more frightening possible outcome than a large scale Ebola outbreak.

Look at the example I mentioned regarding the severe respiratory complications. Is it really a rapid mutation rate as was (despite the calculated rate of mutation not exactly supporting it) ? It was it an unknown, deadlier strain? Again, I’m not sure which is scarier as neither scenario bodes well if an infected person makes it into an international flight. That puts literally 1000’s if people’s life’s in danger before the plane leaves the tarmac from the people checking in your luggage to the TSA agents, everyone in line at the security checkpoints the lady at the magazine stand, the people in line when you get something to eat before the flight and then all of the passengers and crew.

It is quite literally a nightmare scenario.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 12:32 AM
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The populations of Indian and Africa are encroaching onto previous wild and untouched land. Every now and again some people decide to cut down trees, and as they do so, they'll come into contact with animals, catch and eat bush meat as well as tainted fruit that's already been nibbled. Maybe these animals entered into a symbiotic relationship with these viruses in order to protect their colonies. Some human tribes were known to build special mosquito breeding pots and hang them from trees as a way of preventing rival tribes from entering their lands.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 12:49 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar

So it could be weaponised? Could someone get a sample cultivate it and set it free at an airport?.
Like twelve monkeys?.
How long before you show symptoms?.
edit on 29-5-2018 by testingtesting because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 12:51 AM
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If they keep sending people in and out of these rare outbreaks, they will cause the spread.
15 people in a remote sh@thole getting sick always happened, we just never heard about it before.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: TinfoilTP

You make a good point, but we have to be able to learn about any new symptoms and changes to what ever at that time they are placing warnings on. I don’t have an answer but yes we shouldn’t send people in and out but like I said we need certain info. But I guess you could get the same info from robots....Meet T3


edit on 2/19/2013 by Allaroundyou because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 01:36 AM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: peter vlar

So it could be weaponised?


It definitely has the potential. Particularly if the version that is associated with respiratory distress is a previously unknown strain. It would be more stable in that scenario than if respiratory complications are result of a rapidly mutating version.


Could someone get a sample cultivate it and set it free at an airport?.
Like twelve monkeys?.


It’s hard to say definitively yes or no unfortunately. Nipah has only been known about since 1998
And there are far more unknowns than there is definitive knowns which to me, makes it a pretty frightening prospect. It could turn out to be overblown fear mongering because of how little is really know at this point. In ten years we may find that it’s ease of transmission and high mortality rate have got more to do with the sanitation, medical care and local customs of the areas where outbreaks occur. One outbreak was traced to people drinking raw date palm sap that was tainted by bats (either guano or saliva).


How long before you show symptoms?.


As soon as a few days and as long as 2 weeks. Some people are infectious and show no symptoms or symptoms that appear to be something more benign, until encephalopathy sets in which can be as soon as 24-48 hours. But that timeframe is based on people who are symptomatic. It’s the encephalopathy that does the major damage but it’s kind of a no brainer that swelling of your brain is never a sign of good things to come.

It’s the large number of unknown variables and the potential for the virus to spread quickly and easily across a wide range of habitats that makes it a frightening prospect. Then factor in the variable mortality rates... early outbreaks had mortality as low as 10%. Others more recently as high as 92%. The sample sizes are small at the moment. The 92% fatality outbreak was 11 dead of 12 infected so it’s really hard to make concrete determinations at this point unfortunately. Plus, there are no treatments for it. All that can be done is palliative/comfort care and hope for the best. I’m not a fan of those odds!
edit on 29-5-2018 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 02:58 AM
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And there we have it... tonight's nightmare brought to me be infolurker...

Bleh, knowledge is always a good thing, even if its something I don't want to hear.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 03:44 PM
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Do we have an answer in regards to how long after the viruses kills its host will it, itself die?



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: SirKonstantin

This is a crazy virus!

Outside of host, in fruit juice, 3 days have been seen. In date sap there are reports of 7 days. And you can get it when preparing a body for burial which guessing where this spread is a rather short amount of time (1 or 2 days but it did not specifically say in the article).

It is in white cells (leukocytes) and there can be post mortem lesions containing the virus. That is where direct contact is thought to happen (slaughtered animals, pigs and horses in the article), tainted meat, infected people.

What is worse, is it has been seen in other species that humans live with (when they too eat infected meat), cats and dogs.

iastate.edu, factsheet (PDF) - Nipah Virus Infection.

Since I was over at the CDC reading about Bio Safety Levels (BSL), linky.

Basically, it goes from low, 1, to high, BSL-4, where the full suit, vented air, and specialty procedures are enforced by how the building is designed.

Thanks for the new nightmares!




posted on May, 29 2018 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: SirKonstantin

viruses can't survive without living cells to utilize for replication and die very quickly. HIV for example can survive up to 6 days exposed in the open air if infected fluids are spilled but it is in such negligible amounts that it is rendered effectively inert because of the low concentrations. With Nipah, the most effective way to contain the spread of further transmission is isolation from infected pigs, bats or people. The 1998-1999 outbreak was halted once protective equipment to isolate people from the infected pigs was put into place as well as the culling of nearly 1 million pigs in the region where the infections originated. The only positive with Nipah is that the only wildlife reservoirs testing positive are pigs and specific species of bats. Here is a paper discussing transmission in humans that gives a little more insight. As always, don't take the word of random people on a conspiracy site! Always look up as much information as you can find. Having been identified less than 20 years ago (the first outbreak was in September of '98) there are still far too many unknown variables with this newly classified genus of viruses but the paper I linked and cited wsill give you a good starting point for better information.



posted on Jun, 5 2018 @ 07:06 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Thank you!!!



posted on Jun, 5 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Anytime man. Always happy to provide any information I can come across to help others get the proper answers they seek. Sometimes that means adding a link or 2 afternky rant to support what I’m saying but a little light reading never killed anyone. Not that I know of at least.




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