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F-35 combat deput

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posted on May, 24 2018 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: Kkintekk

originally posted by: Flipper35
Israel has never been shy about putting new equipment to use right away.






Yea sure… NEVER SHY about!..! % 99.9 is LIE about, and the rests is LIE too..! Come’on people…!! Jesus….




They did the same with the F15 and F16 which is all verifiable. I know shy and lie rhyme so it is easy to confuse the issue, but this would not be out of the norm given past, known, sorties.




posted on May, 24 2018 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: mightmight

All those things do is make them visible to civilian towers....thats all. The B2 had em as well. It helps disguise the signature of the airframe during normal operations. They are electronic devices, not just pieces of metal sticking out.



posted on May, 24 2018 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: mightmight

A corner of a panel or a screw sticking up causes the RCS to increase. On the F-117 skin oil was enough to do the same thing. Four metal plates at 90 degree angles will easily do it.
edit on 5/24/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

Many of them are just bits of metal. They have different ones to alter the RCS to different levels. A metal plate at 90 degrees will alter a stealth RCS noticeably. I've seen the F-22s in Asia with a big one hanging underneath, and barely noticeable ones in CONUS.
edit on 5/24/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2018 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: mightmight
a reply to: Zaphod58
Really? An actual Luneburg Lense is supposed to look like this: www.qualifiedrapidproducts.com...
I dont think 4 metal knobs would have that much Impact.



That's an rf lens for an antenna. It's generally embedded within a radio-transparent sheath. The principal is the same, you just need to assemble one in front of semispherical reflector to get a "retroreflector". That's the real end goal. Usually three of them assembled facing different directions to make a tri-lens reflector. It's going to be optimized for X-band, but works across a pretty wide range.

You can also make a decent retroreflector with plates at ninety degree angles. Not as effective, but it works and is a great deal simpler (cheaper).

People are using luneberg and retroreflector interchangeably in the thread which might be confusing.



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