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A new effective technique for meditation.

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posted on May, 19 2018 @ 09:01 PM
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I've been playing around with breathing meditation on and off for some months now. I love the sense of peace that it instills in my mind, but I also find it very laborious, and I often find myself wondering how much longer before my 25 minute timer goes off. This is the main reason why I find it difficult to meditate on a daily basis.

Today, I decided to try and find a way to break through to another level of meditation. I started my regular breathing meditation, and started contemplating what I desired from the experience. I want to look beyond our world, and experience a conscious superposition of the physical world and the spiritual world. Then, as I sat in silence, I remembered a subtle experience I had about 15 years ago:

I was sitting in a room, with a fly-swatter in hand. The room was silent, and I was bored. When I sit in silence, I always hear a faint whining sound in my ear. I've heard it all my life. Its almost like tinnitus, but not usually noticeable (I've had acute tinnitus before). Then I noticed that as I waved the metal fly-swatter around, I could hear what sounded like the phase shift in the whining sound. Its like my ears or maybe my brain had the capability to perceive some form of EM radiation, as if I were hearing it.

So, while I sat in silent meditation, I decided to focus less on my breathing, and more on finding that ground state frequency. It was not difficult to find, so I then focused on amplifying it in my mind. Within the remaining 10-15 minutes of my initial 25 minute session, it really felt like my body was dissolving. I knew the locations of my hand and feet, but I couldn't feel them. It was as if the standing waves that held my atoms together where unwinding.

This is a new level for me. I can't wait to explore it further. It didn't feel mentally laborious, or boring. It felt like I was rediscovering my natural state of existence.

When I came back to "reality", it was like I was experiencing everything again for the first time...as if knowledge and experience had been disconnected during the meditative state, and reconnected afterwards.

Is this technique new? Surely someone else has used it and had a similar experience.

I would like to hear your personal experiences, tips, and/or theories.

Thanks.




posted on May, 19 2018 @ 10:33 PM
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25 minutes is just not enough time for me to meditate. I also use the breath but imagine my body are lungs and just observe the normal breath as it enters and exists. I find it very powerful but have to face fear when body goes asleep. I hate letting go of my last bodily sensation, typically my breathing/lungs, which seems akin to death to me. If I get past that stage I exists in in a void of nothingness in which I can remain for hours. When I exit I feel like I'm 10 feet tall. Incredibly relaxed. With the brain just idling with no demands nor needs for hours afterwards. The only visual experience that I had in that void was a big eye that appeared from nothing and just stared at me. It really scared the crap out of me and I didn't meditate for years afterwards.

Thanks for explaining what works for you.



posted on May, 19 2018 @ 10:43 PM
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sounds interesting, I like body breathing or belly breathing and chanting

if you chant om mani pedme hum enough you will feel great, deep belly sounds



posted on May, 19 2018 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: glend

Twenty-five minutes was about all I could tolerate with standard breathing meditation and trying to silence my mind, but with this new technique, I honestly felt like I could have gone for hours, but I had a schedule to keep. I'm definitely going to allow myself more time for my next session. Thanks for sharing.



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 01:03 AM
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originally posted by: BELIEVERpriest
I've been playing around with breathing meditation on and off for some months now. I love the sense of peace that it instills in my mind, but I also find it very laborious, and I often find myself wondering how much longer before my 25 minute timer goes off. This is the main reason why I find it difficult to meditate on a daily basis.

Today, I decided to try and find a way to break through to another level of meditation. I started my regular breathing meditation, and started contemplating what I desired from the experience. I want to look beyond our world, and experience a conscious superposition of the physical world and the spiritual world. Then, as I sat in silence, I remembered a subtle experience I had about 15 years ago:

I was sitting in a room, with a fly-swatter in hand. The room was silent, and I was bored. When I sit in silence, I always hear a faint whining sound in my ear. I've heard it all my life. Its almost like tinnitus, but not usually noticeable (I've had acute tinnitus before). Then I noticed that as I waved the metal fly-swatter around, I could hear what sounded like the phase shift in the whining sound. Its like my ears or maybe my brain had the capability to perceive some form of EM radiation, as if I were hearing it.

So, while I sat in silent meditation, I decided to focus less on my breathing, and more on finding that ground state frequency. It was not difficult to find, so I then focused on amplifying it in my mind. Within the remaining 10-15 minutes of my initial 25 minute session, it really felt like my body was dissolving. I knew the locations of my hand and feet, but I couldn't feel them. It was as if the standing waves that held my atoms together where unwinding.

This is a new level for me. I can't wait to explore it further. It didn't feel mentally laborious, or boring. It felt like I was rediscovering my natural state of existence.

When I came back to "reality", it was like I was experiencing everything again for the first time...as if knowledge and experience had been disconnected during the meditative state, and reconnected afterwards.

Is this technique new? Surely someone else has used it and had a similar experience.

I would like to hear your personal experiences, tips, and/or theories.

Thanks.




Simply focusing on your breathing is one way to get there. You found a different vehicle to get to the same place.



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 01:12 AM
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Meditation involving sound of some kind is one of the more popular methods out there, so there's a good amount of info available.

Everything from chants to "listening to the silence" (similar, verging on indistinguishable from what you described) are viable and time-tested methods for meditation. A lot also depends on what you are looking for, in a sense, but if you find one method that clicks with where you are at in life, definitely explore it a bit more.

Some practices will advise "harmonizing" with what you called the ground state frequency. This can be done everywhere from just your mind to your vocal chords. In other words, try things like singing along, melting into it (as you described), or even wrestling with it, so to speak. Imagination is the limit, really!



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Been trancendentally meditating /astrally projecting since 1968.The different breathing techniques never we're as successful as slowing my rythmn to 4 breaths a min, or 1 in 7 1/2 seconds.. 1 exhale for 7 1/2 secs.

Used to scare the crap outta the wife cause it looked like I was dead.

Different tecn. for diff. practitioners. And no timers for me.. too restrictive...
edit on 20-5-2018 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest


Ummm...try void meditation...don’t...”think not thinking”...cease thought...

Stop trying...simply be...stop thinking or visualizing...be awareness only...







YouSir



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 11:28 AM
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----
edit on 20-5-2018 by nOraKat because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2018 @ 11:52 AM
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To update, last night before going to bed, I sat up and did some more of the "listening to silence" meditation. I didn't time myself, but I felt like I was able to go deeper much faster. Eventually my back started tightening up (due to the rainy weather in my area), so I decided to lay down and meditate until I either broke through to the void, or fell asleep. I wound up falling asleep, but it was by far the best night of sleep I've ever experienced. I remembered almost ever detail of my dreams, and I woke up feeling so renewed. I love this. Absolutely no complaints, at all.

Thanks for all the feedback.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Good to hear believerpost. Think people fall asleep because they fall victim to daydreaming during meditation. If you remain the watcher (witness) of what is occurring to your body during meditation and don't become part of any thoughts (let them die of their own accord) its very hard to fall asleep unless extremely tired.

If the void is the same void I experience then you shouldn't be able to detect any bodily sensations at all, including the breath. I have only been able to achieve that void a few times. Awaking from it seems akin to wakening from a deep hibernation.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

That is a very curious method, I find that sound to be overwhelming in the silence, sometimes to the point of discomfort. I will have to consider trying this myself. I usually meditate much longer though.. and it may take a lot to endure that sound for a prolonged amount of time.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: NephraTari

I think of that sound as the horizon of time, where from a distance, the future appears to meet the present.



posted on May, 23 2018 @ 08:57 PM
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I had a breakthrough today. Not THE breakthrough, but A breakthrough. I used my technique again, ditched the timer, sat there breathing slowly, listening to the ground state frequency of silence, until the sensation of my hands dissolved. That has become my initial benchmark. I maintained that state for some time. I couldn't seem to find a way to push it further.

Then I realized that what I was feeling was akin to my soul becoming like a Bose-Einstein condensate.



By slowing the activity of my mind, I was able to bring it to such a state of inertia that it was like my soul was reduced down to a fundamental wave. That understanding triggered the breakthrough. What started in my hands spread up to my arms, while my legs, chest, and forehead where doing the same. Eventually, the entire surface of my body dissolved. My sense of physical orientation was gone. All that remained was my sensation of breath, sight, hearing, and smell.

It felt like I was moving, but not anywhere within the x, y, z, axes. I felt a sudden surge of emotion...so strong that I could have burst into tears, but I was beyond that capacity. It was truly a remarkable state.

I tried not to be distracted by intense awe, but my focus was growing weak. Slowly, I began reintegrating. My sense of positional orientation returned, the epicenters of energy in my hands, legs, chest, and forehead started solidifying, and I was back in the flesh. I was able to delay the reintegration process for a while, but unable to reverse it. It was like my mind needed rest from such intense focus, just as a muscle becomes fatigued after exercise.

I think next time, I will be able to sustain the 'condensate' state for much longer. I believe with each successful session, I am building my capacity to achieve new depths.

I would say more, but words escape me. Perhaps one day I'll be able to describe the experience in a series of transcendental equations....



posted on May, 23 2018 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Give it a couple of years of similar experiences and you start to get a bit more comfortable in general.

Its kind of like anything else we do, in that respect. The typical phases of learning are all there, despite how different it seems from something like.. learning an instrument. Kind of neat, really.

For many, it all seems to come full circle after a while. The "normal, mundane" experience of everyday life becomes more "special" than the other stuff. A bit hard to explain, but you'll probably figure it out along with the "why is that the case?"


Its a helluva journey, and one that seems inherent to the human experience. At least for those that seek it out.



posted on May, 24 2018 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

I tried going for it again today. I meditated for at least an hour and a half, and it was like I kept hitting a barrier. I couldn't reach the level of body dissolution that I achieve last time. I wonder if my mind just needs to rest a few days from meditation?

Is there a such thing as meditation fatigue?



posted on May, 24 2018 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

I think there absolutely is such a thing.

I really do see meditation as practice for "being." In that, its exactly like any other practice we do. We can overdo it, have those "perfect" practices, hit "the zone" even when we don't mean to, etc.

With meditation, and plenty of other things I've practiced, sometimes I find my best "performance" comes after a couple day break. Always thought that was interesting..

With meditation specifically though, that whole beginner's luck thing seems vastly more prevalent than anywhere else. Any time we try something new, we have that chance to hit it out of the park. Some might say thats because of a lack of expectations on what we think it should be like, combined with that specific mindset we get when exploring and seeking novelty. Sometimes I think our particular point in time and space has its own things to say too.

There's the typical sayings too, like comparing it to trying to grab debris floating in water (the more you try to snag it, the more quickly it jumps out back into the water). The feeling of that experience is very spot on, in my opinion. The harder we try to get back there, the less likely we are to achieve something here.



posted on May, 31 2018 @ 09:46 PM
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After my last failed attempt to push through my most recent meditation barrier, I decided to rest for a few days, as well as cut back on my coffee consumption (I drink crazy amounts of coffee on a daily basis).

Last night I went in for a long meditation session again, employing the same technique. I came really close to the void again, but its like my body is afraid of letting go. I got to the point that my entire body dissolved, and I even lost the normal sensation of breathing. Instead, it felt like every breath was an influx of electric current that permeated the wave function that I had become...waxing and waning with each breath. I felt like I was being accelerated along some non-Cartesian axis. Perhaps I was perceiving the momentum of each passing moment. I'm not sure, but I couldn't maintain that state for very long. My body insisted on reintegrating.

Upon reintegration, I made a second attempt to dissolve again, but this time, I could only feel the energy moving up and down my spine. It was intense, and exhausting. I didn't want to push it too hard, as I've heard some "kundalini" horror stories before, so I withdrew from meditation, and went to bed.

I've learned a few things from my experience. For me meditation is like looking up into the night sky with an infinitely powerful telescope. I look up and see the stars, but rather than focusing on the stars, I zoom in to the empty spaces between the stars, only to find even more stars in the background, which would normally be drowned out by the light of the closer and brighter stars. No matter how far I continue to zoom into the empty spaces, there will always be more stars. That's how meditation feels, only the stars are thoughts and memories. The more I focused on the empty spaces between those thoughts and memories, the more they emerged in exponentially increasing numbers. I even noticed long forgotten childhood memories.

This morning, I woke up, made my coffee, and listened to a Bible lesson with my wife. Immediately, I noticed that my capacity to pay attention and focus was greatly magnified, to the point that the top of my head and my third-eye region felt like they were sheathed in static electricity. Something as simple as focusing on a casual conversation can trigger the static charge feeling, and that sensation of non-Cartesian acceleration. Even as I type this update, I feel the energy in my third eye.

I feel it changing the way I perceive everyday reality. Can anyone else relate to this?



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