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DNA of every baby born in California is stored. Who has access to it?

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posted on May, 14 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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Scary stuff. Doesn't seem to far fetched they could sell the data to insurance companies and use genetic predisposition to make someone have a higher rate for health insurance.


If you or your child was born in California after 1983, your DNA is likely being stored by the government, may be available to law enforcement and may even be in the hands of outside researchers.

Like many states, California collects bio-samples from every child born in the state. The material is then stored indefinitely in a state-run biobank, where it may be purchased for outside research.

State law requires that parents are informed of their right to request the child’s sample be destroyed, but the state does not confirm parents actually get that information before storing or selling their child’s DNA.

sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com...




posted on May, 14 2018 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: NorthernLites

Ah , this Dude ?





posted on May, 14 2018 @ 05:31 PM
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Dr. Moreau?



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 05:37 PM
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The insurance companies will have a field day with that info eventually. It's worth to much to keep is secret.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 05:59 PM
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posted on May, 14 2018 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: NorthernLites

Oh I SEE.

Well then. Better program my DNA to give anyone that looks at its sequence a run for their money.

If anyone thinks they have the right in any sense to lurk on my DNA, god rest their souls.

Sorry, not sorry.
edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 07:57 PM
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A clone army of Californians! That's the plan!

*shudder*
edit on 5/14/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Californicloneites ... Awesome.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 08:53 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
A clone army of Californians! That's the plan!

*shudder*


Coming from a born and bred Californian: # that to the nth degree.
edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 09:17 PM
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That's really not cool, they have my DNA, asked my mother about this and she never got one of the pamphlets they were supposed to give my parents. Why isn't there a lawsuit forming about this?
I know I would never consent to this and have purposefully avoided doing things like ancestry ect... that would collect my DNA. I pray that they lose my sample and of the other people they stole DNA from.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:01 PM
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People should probably read the article because it's not just California that does this. From the article:



Like many states, California collects bio-samples from every child born in the state. The material is then stored indefinitely in a state-run biobank, where it may be purchased for outside research.



Some states destroy the blood spots after a year, 12 states store them for at least 21 years.

California, however, is one of a handful of states that stores the remaining blood spots for research indefinitely in a state-run biobank.


This would be more helpful if it listed which unnamed states are storing the data indefinitely like California, and which 12 States keep the blood samples for at least 21 years. For example, the article says that Texas used to do this until parents sued to get samples destroyed if they were stored without parental consent. But parents can still consent to have the blood samples stored.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: VashTheStampede
That's really not cool, they have my DNA, asked my mother about this and she never got one of the pamphlets they were supposed to give my parents. Why isn't there a lawsuit forming about this?
I know I would never consent to this and have purposefully avoided doing things like ancestry ect... that would collect my DNA. I pray that they lose my sample and of the other people they stole DNA from.



Right.

It's one thing to use DNA analysis to catch a serial killer/pedo, but we were god damn infants when this was done. We had NO SAY and had done nothing literally NOTHING to deserve this kind of grievous intrusion on our intimate privacy.

This is our DNA we are talking about.

Not my car. Not my kitchen appliances. Not my cat. My and your DNA. The very schematic for our lives.

My god damn DNA and yours, unlawfullly stolen from prying eyes and sold like cattle.

You think that's okay? To steal an infants DNA sequence? You would be sick to your stomach if you knew the extent to which that DNA information has been "utiliized."

Combine that with AI tech.

This needs to be addressed with serious consequences, as it will.
edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: CreationBro




You would be sick to your stomach if you knew the extent to which that DNA information has been "utiliized."

Please elucidate us. I have a bucket handy.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: CreationBro




You would be sick to your stomach if you knew the extent to which that DNA information has been "utiliized."

Please elucidate us. I have a bucket handy.



Are we going to start with how the e.t.'s have used DNA for research purposes or governmental use, special interest use?

I won't claim any absolutes here Phage. You know.


Edit: I take that back. The absolute here, as defined by the OP and my reply, is that many, many citizens of the United States of America had their DNA unlawfully sequenced and possiblly (likely) sold to various 3rd parties for "research" purposes. The DNA of children.

Are you okay with that?

Are there no grounds for legal recourse, should it come to light that my or other's DNA has been sold to various 3rd parties, without my or their respective consent?


edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: CreationBro




is that many, many citizens of the United States of America had their DNA unlawfully sequenced

How do you know the blood samples were sequenced? Why would they be? Seems expensive.

edit on 5/14/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: NorthernLites
Scary stuff. Doesn't seem to far fetched they could sell the data to insurance companies and use genetic predisposition to make someone have a higher rate for health insurance.


If you or your child was born in California after 1983, your DNA is likely being stored by the government, may be available to law enforcement and may even be in the hands of outside researchers.

Like many states, California collects bio-samples from every child born in the state. The material is then stored indefinitely in a state-run biobank, where it may be purchased for outside research.

State law requires that parents are informed of their right to request the child’s sample be destroyed, but the state does not confirm parents actually get that information before storing or selling their child’s DNA.



According to the various articles I've read on this today, apparently *anyone* could ultimately get their hands on it as no one tracks what the researchers are doing with it once it's given to them.

Hell, the researchers that have access to it aren't even vetted up front - and no one tracks what they use it for or what is ultimately done with those samples.

Scary stuff indeed.


edit on 5/14/2018 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Isn't it obvious?

Aliens.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Except that the researchers don't really have any way to determine who the samples came from.



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Totally.

The blood spots are used specifically for genetic testing genetic disorders, but if the blood spots are stored indefinitely in California and sold to 3rd parties, the potential for further genetic sequencing is, imho, instrinsically tied to some of these organizations, groups, etc. interests.


California, however, is one of a handful of states that stores the remaining blood spots for research indefinitely in a state-run biobank.

Even though the parents pay for the lifesaving test itself, the child’s leftover blood spots become property of the state and may be sold to outside researchers without the parent’s knowledge or consent.


We are dealing with educated guess work here so it may or may not be. I'd love to find out though!



edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2018 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Riffrafter

Except that the researchers don't really have any way to determine who the samples came from.



Do we know that for sure? I'd imagine one could be identified by that sample, should a genetic test from ancestry or 23andme were sold or given by a parent or relative of one of these individuals.
edit on 5142018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



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