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Dyess B-1 damaged

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posted on May, 11 2018 @ 07:07 PM
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There aren't many details released on this one, but back on the first a Dyess B-1 made an emergency landing at the Midland, Texas Airport. The official reason for the emergency was the aircraft suffered an engine problem, reportedly a flameout.

That's where things get interesting though. The news reports show various photos of the aircraft, all that show foam was applied. The only reason foam would be applied is because of a fire, or potential for a fire. The other t thing is that Dyess is approximately 150 road miles from the Midland Air & Space Port, closer by air (Dyess has C-130s that could take an engine and crew easily), but 11 days later, it's still sitting in a hangar at the airport.

The Dyess spokesperson said that it would remain there until it is safe to fly back to the base. The fact that it's there almost two weeks later means that this was a lot more serious than just a flameout.

m.tucsonnewsnow.com...

ktxs.com...




posted on May, 11 2018 @ 07:29 PM
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Didn't you hear about that secret air war going on. Clearly they were shot down...



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


The laser defenses misfired? lol.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

So why do you think it's still there after 2 weeks?

Is it something exotic that needs to be left for a bit?

If it's something you don't want to talk about then I understand



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: expatwhite

My best guess is it was either an engine fire that did some damage to the fuselage and other engine, or it was an uncontained failure that threw shrapnel into the fuselage, possibly damaging the hydraulic system and fuselage.

With it being this long, I'd lean more towards the uncontained failure. They would have to do some in depth inspections of the damaged areas as well as the repairs for either, but damage to other systems would explain why it's taking so long.
edit on 5/12/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Cheers zaph. Guess that makes sense



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

If it was a fire, then wiring harnesses, hydro and fuel lines etc would have been destroyed. That could easily be months getting all the parts together, as opposed to just an engine change. Spare parts were always a problem with this jet too, so procurement may be taking a while? Wish I still had access to all the safety reports.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

There was definitely a lot more than just a flameout. I've observed engine changes on many B-1s, and they've been done in like five to six hours. And these were at a base nowhere near where B-1s were.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:17 PM
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Maybe it was a bird strike?



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm not an engine guy, but the onboard fire suppressors should have killed any fire in the air. Maybe the FD just did that as a precaution? B1's have always seemed to have engine problems! At least it didnt fall off. LOL



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Salander

That wouldnt cause a fire.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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An engine fire is kind of contained, unless the fire started outside of the engine. If it was a turbine or fan failure then we could be talking uncontained with blades punching holes in anything they hit.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

With the engines under the fuselage like they are on the B-1, it's a lot more susceptible to damage from an engine fire than other aircraft. It's a lot easier for it to burn through to things that don't much like fire, and do a lot of damage.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

Yeah, they've always had engine issues. The only thing worse than the engines on that thing is the power generation. I suspect that it was just a precaution on the part of the ARFF, but the only reason to use it was that there was an actual fire, or evidence of an actual fire.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I've seen an F-16 with hot brakes explode a wheel and cut a hydro line, which kept igniting as it dropped oil on the hot brake. Could have been possible a cut fuel or hydro line kept igniting after the fire suppressors emptied. Pure speculation of course. Could always ring up Dyess PR for a comment.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

Hydro is nasty. The only time I ever saw a bird come in with a fire after getting a fire warning light it was because of a blown hydro line in #3 engine. It was so rare to see actual fire the crew was going to taxi back to parking.

Thanks for volunteering to contact Dyess.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Xtrozero

With the engines under the fuselage like they are on the B-1, it's a lot more susceptible to damage from an engine fire than other aircraft. It's a lot easier for it to burn through to things that don't much like fire, and do a lot of damage.


Casing is hard to get through, but I still lean towards compressor or turbine blade failure. As a side note, if they came back super heavy they might smoke the breaks and that could be another reason for the foam.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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Meh....i dont speak texican. Lol


reply to: Zaphod58



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

With all the compromises they made to lighten the B-1, I wouldn't be surprised if the upper portion isn't as protected. But there's a lot in that engine bay that can go up, and will intensify the fire and burn through the fuselage.



posted on May, 17 2018 @ 01:19 PM
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At 1:15 this afternoon it's still tucked into the hangar, with the doors closed as far as they can.




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