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New unit designed to detect magnetic anomalies associated with ufo's/uaps.

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posted on May, 11 2018 @ 01:29 PM
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Came across this announcement today with a notation on the NUFORC website about a new unit designed that is able to detect magnetic anomalies than many times have been associated with uap/ufo's. This unit is called a MADAR unit. This may prove interesting and helpful.

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Over the past several weeks, our Center has begun a co-operative arrangement with Mr. Francis Ridge, long-time UFO researcher, Director of the National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena (“NICAP”), and inventor of a UFO detection system, called “MADAR.” The term, “MADAR,” is an acronym for “Multiple Anomaly Detection and Automated Recording.” A MADAR unit is designed to detect magnetic anomalies that appear to be associated with the presence of UFOs. The purpose in posting the periodic detection events, recorded by approximately 25-30 MADAR units currently in operation around the world, is to address whether eyewitness sightings of suspected UFOs might be able to be corroborated by magnetic anomalies recorded by one, or more, MADAR unit(s). More information about MADAR, and how it works, can be found at the MADAR website. MADAR units can be purchased by contacting Mr. Ridge, whose contact information is available on the website shown above.


Madar website

Click on the links for interesting background on how this got started and by who.




posted on May, 11 2018 @ 02:42 PM
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I contacted Mr. Ridge to get my hands on a couple of those MADAR-III for my country.

We´ll have a MADAR-III-net in Germany in no time. It depends on what he can do about the price (220$ a piece), if I assemble them myself.

To whatever beings we would track: Here is the counter-deal: Get my up in your ship and show me around and I´ll forget about this



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 02:49 PM
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I wonder what the "limits" they talk about are. Because natural geomagnetic activity covers a fairly wide range.

Snake oil red flag.



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: data5091

I checked into the MADAR units a few years ago. They are about the same set-up as I have seen in a hobby and craft book from the early 1970's He is offering the unit for $ 199 and the unit in the book can be assembled for less than $20.

I do not know about any differences in the power or range between the units but I would hope his are a lot better to be worth the price.



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 02:58 PM
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I doubt they are the same design (www access, microcontrollers) but I´ll wait..

Snakeoil? I´ll await the response from him before I decide.



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 04:31 PM
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The first thing that comes to mind for me is that an old smart phone can perform all of these measurements and more. There are also some free apps available that can aggregate the phone's sensor data, record it, and transmit it to a remote destination.

The biggest advantage that I see with this piece of hardware, the MADAR, is that it could be considered a standardized device; presumably calibrated at the "factory." Thus the data accumulated by the network could be considered more consistent and trustworthy than that of a network made up of a series of devices from different manufacturers with varying levels of accuracy and responsiveness.

In any event, such a device would be need to be placed outdoors in a location that is not subject to frequent artificial disturbances. And you would need at least a year of baseline data to factor out seasonal and other periodic variations before any apparently anomalous results returned by the device could be trusted.

I actually kind-of like the idea of a citizen-driven network of sensor stations. Not just from a UAP investigation perspective, but also from a perspective of general curiosity. It would be fun to conjecture about the linkage of various natural, and un-natural, events to anomalous environmental measurements detected in the network.

-dex



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley
I won´t get into details (privacy) but I have contacts that would allow me to put these things on several very high buildings in Germany if the owners give their OK (needs to be checked if there are any broadcasting systems on top, first..(disturbance like you said))

I guess a large part of the 199$(or 219$ for me) is time-related to assemble these modules. I already got an answer btw, so there seems to be interest from their side.

What makes me scratch my head is the sensor count on the map, and in the text it says 30+ sensors.



posted on May, 11 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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this is old project, i think j. allen hynek himself helped build it



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: verschickter




What makes me scratch my head is the sensor count on the map, and in the text it says 30+ sensors.


Got it, it´s the ID, not the number of devices in that area, doh..



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: data5091


The entire network can be replaced, and, seriously augmented my using cell phones. My old Galaxy S7 has a magnetometer built-in, and that is all the device being touted can be.

A simple Android/IOS app is all that is needed, and will be less expensive, easier to deploy (especially in the numbers required), and provide a vastly improved "map" of anomalies when coupled with a central database.

Short of that, I'd have to agree with Phage; Snake Oil!

(Y'all should get REAL engineers to design the Tech you need)



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