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Why are there ticks everywhere now?

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posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:00 PM
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Neem oil smells weird but some diluted and sprayed on you should keep them away. (that and maybe some Eucalytpus oil)




posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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originally posted by: nOraKat
Neem oil smells weird but some diluted and sprayed on you should keep them away. (that and maybe someEucalytpus oil)



The wife uses that, keeps me away.

lol.





posted on May, 10 2018 @ 03:50 AM
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Got my first one Monday while moving fire wood. Then 3 more, two in the house and one just going on the front porch. I keep them now for experiments. I'll be making my tick laboratory soon. They are American Dog Ticks, and they don't seem happy being in a bottle. Torture will be far more satisfying then merely killing them as I find them.

When I find out how to control them, I'll be building my tick army. Booo Ha Ha Ha Ha Haaaa!

ETA: Just observing them I've noticed that they engage in their "questing" behavior during the day, then they curl up their front feelers and sleep at night. I'll be testing them for attractants and repellents, what things they sense, and how far they jump, etc. Then after awhile I'll get more creative on what can be done with them.
edit on 10-5-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Added extra comments



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 04:05 AM
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Things are much worse than they were when I grew up. I used to walk through fields and tall grass all the time and spend hours in the woods. I'd occasionally get a tick or two on me if I didn't spray tick repellent on myself before going out. Now you go out in the woods or even step in the weeds and you're covered in ticks. Not only that, but ticks seem to carry more disease now. I don't even go in the woods anymore. Last summer I got a tick on me just from stepping off the sidewalk into some mowed grass.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 04:25 AM
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a reply to: Charizard

One of the first steps I took was clearing weeds and brush from around the house. I now mow my lawn more, it's like a putting green, and have expanded it. But they still seem to get close to the house anyway. I'll be planting tick repelling plants around the edge of my lawn soon.

They actually do drop from the trees from quite a distance, even sailing on the wind during a windy day. The local news claims they don't drop from trees, but I know first hand that they do. Tell me that there aren't any furry critters up in the trees that shed ticks around up there.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 05:02 AM
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Torture will be far more satisfying then merely killing them as I find them.


You´re going to have a hard time torture something that has no nervous system. They won´t even fell pain due to hunger. Don´t know about the psychologic factor, though.




posted on May, 10 2018 @ 05:07 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Ticks can´t jump. It´s also a myth that they let themself fall from trees. They are living at foot to hip-level and hook themselfes onto fur or clothes when something passes their habitat.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: verschickter

Well, you should be collecting live test subjects like I am. The one male tick I collected off the TV screen jumped an inch from the screen to the frame before I caught it. And experience proves to me that they do drop out of trees, as much as 50 ft up. They can shed off tree dwelling animals, even birds. Don't believe what you have heard until you have proof. Also they are sensitive to breezes as well as carbon dioxide, so I doubt they relay on brushing up against them for them to find a host. I'll be doing some in depth studies on the most common tick available around here, the American Dog tick.

Argue about what you consider facts and believe who you will, but I know the truth. What these so-called experts say is not always what you find with experience.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 06:02 AM link quote reply Torture will be far more satisfying then merely killing them as I find them. You´re going to have a hard time torture something that has no nervous system.


They have a nervous system, don't be silly!
edit on 10-5-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: typo

edit on 10-5-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: for clarity

edit on 10-5-2018 by MichiganSwampBuck because: another typo



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

Yes you´re right. I should have worded it more clearly. The do not feel pain like we do, supposedly.




Also they are sensitive to breezes as well as carbon dioxide, so I doubt they relay on brushing up against them for them to find a host. I'll be doing some in depth studies on the most common tick available around here, the American Dog tick.

Post your findings here


It´s a long refuted myth but go for it.
edit on 10-5-2018 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: verschickter

I can totally believe they are insensitive to pain, esp. hunger. I have read that they can live for as much as two seasons without any blood. It does seem like they are aware that I have them captive, but perhaps I give them too much credit.

I hope I don't find myself actually having empathy for these vile creatures after studying them. Ultimately they are doomed by my hand when I'm through playing with them.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck




I hope I don't find myself actually having empathy for these vile creatures after studying them. Ultimately they are doomed by my hand when I'm through playing with them.


I don´t harm any animal by intention, except for those that go for my blood. Gnats, mosquitos, ticks and vampires. Fair game if they wan´t to suck my life-sap. In your case you would collect them knowingly, I understand your moral dilemma.



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 10:42 AM
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I’m the same as Jagstorm. I once made my mom a poison ivy bouquet. She loved it. She stuck it in a vase. Neither of us got a rash. My dad is allergic to it so he had a bit of a freak out when he saw poison ivy in the vase. However, I’ve been told I could develop an allergy at any time, so I stay clear when I see it. I was also immune to jellyfish stings. These were the kind of jellyfish that are abundant in the Chesapeake Bay. Other kids used to howl and flee the water. I had more than a few drag tentacles across my leg and I didn’t feel anything and couldn’t understand what the fuss was.

But if a mosquito bites me I get a huge lump and suffer for weeks. It’s terrible. I’m also allergic to wasp and bee venom. I haven’t had a reaction so bad that it’s near fatal, but I swell up badly and the stung area sometimes turns bruised and is painful for weeks to months and I get really dizzy. I had a doctor who said that’s not an allergic reaction so he refused to issue me an Epi-Pen. I never asked any other doctors about it. I take Benadryl when I get stung, instead. I at first assumed everyone got that much pain and suffering when stung. But then I’ve seen my mom and daughter and husband get stung and they end up with no worse than a tiny red mark that clears up in a day.

We definitely have a lot of ticks everywhere. I blame that on the soaring deer and fox and raccoon population.
edit on 12-5-2018 by SheeplFlavoredAgain because: Quoted post didn’t show up. Was answering JagStorm



posted on May, 12 2018 @ 10:50 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



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