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Why are there ticks everywhere now?

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posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:00 AM
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I've been gardening a long time (probably longer than some of you have been alive) and of course I've come across my share of ticks.
Oddly enough I have never once in my life had a tick on me. I don't drink milk and they say that might be an attractant, or certain blood types.

I worry about my dog and family. Some say climate change is causing tick populations to explode, some say bird migration or animal patterns.

I have never seen it this bad this early. Ticks everywhere, huge ones!
edit on 9-5-2018 by JAGStorm because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Don't know where you are but i remove a few every year (garden in The New Forest, S.England) not seen one yet this year. I'm pretty confident i'll bring home one or two pretty soon though


edit to add: The change in climate is probably helping them - not getting long sub zero periods in winter any more to kill all the little critters off.
edit on 9-5-2018 by johnb because: ^



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: johnb

In in Wisconsin and I have never seen it this bad in the Midwest in at least 15+ years. I'm not the only one.
I have friends that are actually moving because they are sick of the battle with lyme disease and are moving to the city.

I've always seen then in brush, or plants while gardening, but this year I've even seen them on the sidewalk, on the house. Just everywhere. I just sprayed and hopefully that will at least keep them away from the house.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

whatever eats ticks in your area had a rough year last year. thats how it usually works.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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We normally have quite a few ticks around by this time of year and we don’t have any. I was just commenting to my husband about it. We did have a second winter so maybe that did it.

I hate those little buggers.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:14 AM
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Grow some spearmint in your garden. Raise some chickens.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

That would be possums. At least on my property I saw more possums last year, and they are voracious tick eaters.
A lot of horse farms don't like possums because they bring some disease but I saw tons of them around us, and a lot of possum roadkill too.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Wow never seen an infestation like that.

BFT: The new forest is full of wild deer, horses and ponies, cattle, pigs plus all the usual stuff so it's well known for tick issues but as above nothing like JAG is describing.

Be interesting to hear how widespread that infestation is.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

It depends on the type of tick. In the NE there's an explosion of deer ticks over the last several years and it has closely followed the explosion of the white tailed deer population. The DDT bomb is finally being overcome and, combined with other conservation techniques and a generally more environmentally conscious population, many species have made a huge come back: turkey, bald eagles, red tailed hawks, otter, osprey, etc..



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:18 AM
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I always forage for morels at this time of year, and it's tick season. My friends have all said this year is unusually terrible for ticks, but personally it's the only year I haven't had to pick them off yet. I have to agree with bigfatfurrytexan on this one.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: JAGStorm

whatever eats ticks in your area had a rough year last year. thats how it usually works.
Possums eat ticks.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

We noticed that fire ants were a little worse this year...

...but after armadillos dug up my back yard, causing my oldest dog to dislocate both knees running one day, we dispatched 3 of them.

I suspect there is cause and effect there.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:27 AM
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I'm in Maine and they are already out in force. I have pulled 3 off me this week and I think i only had 1 all of last year. I haven't even been in the woods. It is bad here.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:33 AM
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I haven't seen any yet here in northern indiana but my wife says her facebook friends have been saying ticks are terrible.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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Milk contains Monolaurin and lauric acid, coconut oil is a good source of lauric acid too. It actually protects us from the tick bacteria by keeping the membrane of the bacteria cells permeable by our immune system. Those microbes can protect themselves with a slime, a simple proteinase can disolve that slime. Bromelain from pineapple works, grapefruit juice works, and so do onions. The proteinase is not heat stable, so it should not be pasturized juice, the stuff in the refrigerator section or the frozen juices are better for that. They also do have relatively cheap monolaurin and bromelain supplements, I like the bromelain to get rid of the milk headache I get the day after eating icecream or milk products. I like fresh pineapple, that works great too. But there is more pineapple than the wife and I like in a pineapple, occasionally we get one though. We also get a few grapefruit on occasion and also we use quite a bit of onions, I like raw onion on my burgers and hotdogs.

Grapefruit, like citrus, can sensitize the skin to the sun and it is advisable not to drink these juices and fruits before going out into the sun. Also veggies containing furocoumarins can be a problem with sun exposure. I tried to research how long before the body breaks these down, but it is variable for different people. I would say that at least four hours of sun restriction is needed after drinking juice and furocoumerins require around twelve hours. But that varies between people, I avoid these kind of things in my diet and eat other foods in the summer if working outside in the sun.

The citrus sensitivity is independant of the proteinase in grapefruit, the proteinase I believe does not cause much sun sensitivity. It can actually thin the mucus and lead to some intolerance of heat in the lungs and nose though. This is just general information, people need to be aware of the properties and see how it works with them.

So if you are going out to pick berries, eat free range eggs fried in a mixture of coconut oil and butter. Chickens that run around the yard and eat ticks make antigens to the Lyme and this may stimulate some people to build up resistance to lyme disease from eating the eggs. Have coffee with that breakfast instead of orange juice, coffee stimulates the heating or cooling systems, hot does that, anything hot. Cold stimulates energy production, take something cold with you to have when you start running out of energy. For the proteinase and also some resistance to tick diseases, have onions on the burger or hot dog you have for lunch. Avoid salads for lunch, it will make you too hot after lunch. Don't even take oranges berry picking. Do not eat the blueberries too much when picking them, they contain furocoumerins too, wait till afterward to eat more than a few. Also, eating the berries makes you have to pee and poop, it kind of sucks, remember toilet paper. Nature is a laxative.

I use deep woods off during tick season, using it sparingly. If you go out every day, it might be better to get something that is a little more natural. Male mosquitoes like to eat fruit, they do not actually bite us usually, unless pissed I suppose. Females suck the life out of you...sounds like some women I know...but they do not always inject that junk in that makes you itch. Never swat right down on the mosquito when it is biting, brush it off or all that irratent gets squashed into you. I researched this after noticing some mosquitoes do not bite around the bushes, and after watching mosquitoes sucking blood without itch occurring. Push it sideways first and the itchmaker and stinger is pulled out. Squash them and it is opposite.

If in question whether a mosquito is going to bite you, bring a strong magnifying glass and look for balls.


The idea with ticks is to try to make sure that you are protected somewhat from the bacteria they contain, the monolaurin and proteinase will help your body cope with that. Learn how to remove the ticks so the head does not break off and remember squishing them wrong makes them spit into the skin and that contains the stomach/salive with the Lyme disease more of a problem.
edit on 9-5-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: PorteurDeMort

I'm in Massachusetts and I've already gotten two so far this year. One was only on me for about an hour or so but left a big red mark. After a couple days I went to the doctor and he gave me some antibiotics just in case. I've had ticks in the past, but I've never had one that left such a mark on me.

The conversation with the doctor was kind of funny. He started telling me that ticks usually need to be attached for about 36 hours before you really need to start worrying about Lyme disease and it usually takes 3-30 days for symptoms like the bulls-eye rash to show up and all the other reasons why I shouldn't worry. He was giving this speech while I was taking off my shirt and the whole conversation stopped as soon as the mark became visible. He stopped talking and went, "Hmmmm...that doesn't look good at all. Let me give you some treatment choices." lol

I opted for the one time dose of antibiotics as a prophylaxis as I didn't really believe I was getting Lyme disease, but something definitely wasn't right either. He offered a 14 day course of antibiotics, but we both felt that would have been overkill.

Good news is that it is healing nicely, but after a week, it is still there. It's just not as angry, red and itchy as it was.

But the ticks are definitely worse this year than previous years, at least in my area.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Tick Talk



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 12:03 PM
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Ayuh to another Mainer!! LOL...Do you remember growing up and seeing the sprayers going down the sides of the road in the springtime? They actually use to spray the roadsides with pesticides and if you did not want them to spray in front of your own property, you just placed a few signs saying "No spray" and they would skip over you....they no longer spray roadsides due to too many complaints on chemicals and such....thus infestations, of not only ticks but mosquitos and black flies as well.....I am not a "chemical" person but I sure do miss those pumptrucks going down the road these days...agreed, the ticks are horrible and getting worse, it is why I refuse to eat Moose meat anymore, those who live in the Northern woods know how bad ticks are on those creatures, to the point where they would be cascading down in lines from the underbellies of the moose, been infected for years and only now are the IFW actually admitting there is a problem...can't lose those fees in hunting licenses from out-of-staters you know!! LOL...I wonder when our state will FINALLY admit we have Mountain Lions, and yes, we do, I mean, they don't just stop at the border of Canada and say, "Ooops! Can't cross the border!!" LOL...SMH...a reply to: PorteurDeMort



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Warmer weather as I understand it.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 12:15 PM
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Ticks have always been everywhere, except I guess in recent times when we humans caused a lot of creatures and plants to start disappearing.

If it's something out of the ordinary than that's a good sign, it means nature is thriving.
They are suppose to be out there in the foliage.




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