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How does fishing (actual fish) work?

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posted on May, 8 2018 @ 09:48 PM
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Hope this is the right place for this topic. I didnt see a recreational category.
In an effort to broaden my survival skills and for therapeutic reasons, i started fishing. Mostly in small ponds that are stocked by the county with blue gill, bass, and trout. In aggregate, ive probably spend 6 hours doing this, usually spending an hour to an hour and half in the afternoon. So far i have caught a small bass using a spinner bait. I have a few questions.

1. Does rod size matter? I starting using an old two piece ugly stick with a spincast reel that i bought a year ago, but just bought a telescoping rod with a spincast reel that fits inside a backpack when collapsed but extends to about 3 feet. I havent really noticed a difference. What effect does size have?

2. Do you catch more fish by casting and reeling lures that move around alot or by casting and letting the bobber and bait do its thing?

3. Does it help to put a small piece of scented bait on spinner bait to attract fish, or is it just the movement that works?

4. In really murky water, what should i be using for bait and lures?

Thanks!
edit on 8-5-2018 by Whoisjohngalt because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 8 2018 @ 09:55 PM
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Fished a lot over my lifetime. Bluegills like worms on a number six hook with a small sinker and a bobber. Don't spray bug dope on your hands, WD40 works good to repel mosquitoes and actually the oil on the bait attracts the fish.

Bass like worms or sometimes you can use poppers or little fish like lures that float but dive when you jerk them. Like rapalas but more colorful and shorter but with the little pull down flap in front. Those lures have a name, but I am tired, I can't think of it at the time.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 09:56 PM
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originally posted by: Whoisjohngalt
Hope this is the right place for this topic. I didnt see a recreational category.
In an effort to broaden my survival skills and for therapeutic reasons, i started fishing. Mostly in small ponds that are stocked by the county with blue gill, bass, and trout. In aggregate, ive probably spend 6 hours doing this, usually spending an hour to an hour and half in the afternoon. So far i have caught a small bass using a spinner bait. I have a few questions.

1. Does rod size matter? I starting using an old two piece ugly stick with a spincast reel that i bought a year ago, but just bought a telescoping rod with a spincast reel that fits inside a backpack when collapsed but extends to about 3 feet. I havent really noticed a difference. What effect does size have?

2. Do you catch more fish by casting and reeling lures that move around alot or by casting and letting the bobber and bait do its thing?

3. Does it help to put a small piece of scented bait on spinner bait to attract fish, or is it just the movement that works?

4. In really murky water, what should i be using for bait and lures?

Thanks!

1) Not unless you are going after trophies

2) Depends on the type of fish you are after and river or lake . Bamboo cane and line via the casting and waiting method is my way. Very old fashioned , yet effective.

3) Use live , no scent . Or for general fishing , dough balls or popcorn . Here in Georgia I use spring lizards for catfish and (hahaha) live wild geese(a story for another day)

4) Very dependent on a lot of factors. Most water where fish are found is at least a bit murky

Word of caution - when going after cats , watch out. They can mess a person up really bad , really quick.

Good topic.



edit on 5/8/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/8/18 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

A lot of it depends on what you're trying to catch and when.

Catfish like stink bait fished along the bottom. You cast it out and let it sit. The fish will find it.

Fish like bass are active ambush hunters, so those are the sorts you're trying to tempt with lures.

Blue gill will attack almost anything dangling off a hook under a bobber. I've even caught some off hunks of marshmallow because they're that competitive and that curious.

But it again depends on what you're trying to catch. You need to research the fish and their habits and preferences too. That's as important as your gear. Then you need to know where it is you're fishing and where those fish are likely to be hanging out in that body of water.

Part of the fun of fishing is taking the time to learn your local body of water and what's in it and how to tease it out.


As far as fishing gear (rod/reel), my dad has an old blue fishing pole with an old Mitchell spin-cast reel that I use for everything. I've caught catfish of several varieties from bullhead to channel to flathead, bluegill, crappie, bass, and northern pike on it. It's performed admirably for all.
edit on 8-5-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

I like to troll. Just put the boat in slow put your rod in a holder with a rapala lure and drive around drinking and smoking and wait for the rod to bend.

Of course you will need a boat.. But you will not regret getting one ..

Something about cruising your boat around the lake makes you feel like more of a man..



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 10:28 PM
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Back a few years I had a guide and outfitting service; Flyfishing the rivers and streams in the Rockies for Rainbows and Browns. Winter time in the Keys stalking bonefish, specs and Reds on the flats.

Flyfishing does take some specialized equipment and some practice casting but well worth the effort.

Even warm water species will hit a well placed fly or streamer.
edit on 8-5-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

Bobber with hook and a small minnow works good . Heck even a worm will work . Fly fishing is probably the best way to go though . Its fun and if you got the right fly on at the right time its lethal .



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

My advice is to first pick what type of fish you are going to target. If your aim is to catch and release, then I would recommend going for the bass. If your aim is to eat the fish, then go for trout. If your aim is to catch as many fish as possible, go for the blue gill.

Rod size will only make a difference in getting fish to bite as it relates to casting distance. In terms of setting the hook and landing the fish, rod length, speed, and strength can make a difference. They can also make a difference on bait presentation.

Live bait works better than lures. Find out what food is available for the local fish and use that. For bass small bait fish work best. Trout fishing is very variable depending upon the body of water and the time of year. In lakes trout will stay deep during the summer months. For blue gill I would gather some muscles from the body of water your fishing in and use them as bait with a small bobber. Make sure to hook them through the cartilage that connects them to the shell (having removed them from the shell.)

However, when using live bait it's really not fishing but waiting. Using lures is much funner for me. I mostly go for bass. The darker the day or the water then you should use bigger lures with brighter colors. I prefer soft plastic swim baits or worms but will use anything on a given day.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 11:03 PM
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use whatever catch small fish put hook in small fish and let it swim than u get medium fish repeat as needed tell you have all the fish u want

oh this is not legal in some places so make shure your alowed to otherwise really effective

easyest fish to catch is catfish u buy a bloodbait and let it rot in your trunk for a month or 2 and they will hit it every time



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: Whoisjohngalt
Hope this is the right place for this topic. I didnt see a recreational category.
In an effort to broaden my survival skills and for therapeutic reasons, i started fishing. Mostly in small ponds that are stocked by the county with blue gill, bass, and trout. In aggregate, ive probably spend 6 hours doing this, usually spending an hour to an hour and half in the afternoon. So far i have caught a small bass using a spinner bait. I have a few questions.

1. Does rod size matter? I starting using an old two piece ugly stick with a spincast reel that i bought a year ago, but just bought a telescoping rod with a spincast reel that fits inside a backpack when collapsed but extends to about 3 feet. I havent really noticed a difference. What effect does size have?

2. Do you catch more fish by casting and reeling lures that move around alot or by casting and letting the bobber and bait do its thing?

3. Does it help to put a small piece of scented bait on spinner bait to attract fish, or is it just the movement that works?

4. In really murky water, what should i be using for bait and lures?

Thanks!

1) Not unless you are going after trophies

2) Depends on the type of fish you are after and river or lake . Bamboo cane and line via the casting and waiting method is my way. Very old fashioned , yet effective.

3) Use live , no scent . Or for general fishing , dough balls or popcorn . Here in Georgia I use spring lizards for catfish and (hahaha) live wild geese(a story for another day)

4) Very dependent on a lot of factors. Most water where fish are found is at least a bit murky

Word of caution - when going after cats , watch out. They can mess a person up really bad , really quick.

Good topic.




Fish got powers.
Certain catfish can deliver electric shocks from their whiskers. Others can barb or horn you. Painful.
Between that and catching a rather large gar at an early age ruined fishing for me.
I rarely tread into natural bodies of water I can't see the ground through.


edit on 8-5-2018 by the owlbear because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-5-2018 by the owlbear because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: the owlbear

The worst ?
The old saying is "a boot on the neck"
Thats how to handle a cat
And a boot , not a sandal or a sneaker
Otherwise , that fin can cut through like a knife through hot butter



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 01:20 AM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

First and foremost congratulations on starting such an awesome hobby! Fishing has always been my go to when trying to escape from reality. It's a good time to think and reflect, or simply unwind from a long week. Here's a few things I've learned while fishing:

1. Size of rod can effect the speed of your hookset, the way you retrieve your bait and the way said bait is presented, and it can also dictate the distance and placement in which you're able to cast.

2. If I'm using a bobber my goal is typically to catch pan fish, which are your blue gill, sun fish, perch, and crappie. I'll do this typically around sunrise, mid afternoon, and sunset. My target areas to fish would be around any type of visible in or out of water structure. If I'm using an artificial lure my goal is to catch bass, walleye, pike, or some type of lake trout. I'll target these kind of fish before and after sunrise, late afternoon and all the way to midnight. These fish are typically more active during the cooler parts of the day, and can be found off shore close to drop offs, sunken trees, or heavily vegatated areas.

3. I've never really noticed the benefits of using scented bait. To me it's all about presentation and being able to place your bait at the right place and at the right time. Try adjusting your retrieval speeds every 3-5 casts, throw a pause in there, real in for a few seconds and give the lure a few life like jerks, and continue to real in afterwards. Your goal is to provoke the fish into either feeding or giving you a reaction strike. There's no right or wrong way to fish, it's an art, and you must find what works best for you.

4. I'll break this one down for you the best that I can. Fishing in clear water and murky water are to completely different entities. In clear water fish tend to be smarter, choosing to feed on more life like and relatable objects. Check your surroundings to find out what seems likely to be a viable food source. Do you see crayfish? Frogs? Minnows? Bait fish? If it had recently rained worms would be in abundance and something fish would likely be feeding on. Also the color of your bait should be more life like and less artificial in a clear water atmosphere. In dark or murky waters my goal is typically to get a reactionary strike. I'll use things like brighter colors, lures that give off certain vibrations, sounds, or that reflect light. In murky waters presentation isn't everything, it's about getting the attention of the fish and provoking it into biting.

I hope this helps! Best of luck to you and your future fishing endeavors! Remember, even if you're not catching fish you can always enjoy your time spent by the water with nature!

Cheers!
-StS



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 01:38 AM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

First you need an IQ higher than the fish, I still don't and always feed them, it's all part of the cycle though I'm just giving back...



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

with practice, you can outfish anyone using only a branch off a tree and twine, with a shiny hook, no bait needed,

all the rest is just to make it idiot proof.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 05:53 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I feed them too. Usually crusts of sandwich and other doughy left overs. My Dad and my Grandad were both fisherman but they both left my life many years ago.

I might try fishing again sometime.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: Gothmog

My dad taught me.

You grab it around the head behind the forward fins and in front of the dorsal spine and you control the back end with the other hand. If you don't control the other end, it can flip out and catch your palm with the dorsal spine. Being finned hurts!

With the bigger ones, you're looking at getting creative, but for pan-size cats, that method of handling usually works just fine.

And with bullhead ... well, unless you're really good at judging them, little buggers have usually swallowed your hook right down and are dying by the time you've gotten back anyhow.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: Whoisjohngalt

Just fish around cover, and you'll be fine. As far as weight, around my neck of the woods we try to use the lightest tackle possible. More finesse and feel that way. Also, if your in a pond, use something bright and noisy or something stinky. Happy fishing



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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Ok,it can be complicated or simple.Having fished for 50+ years My advice to you is find someone nearby to help you learn.Most avid fisherman will show you the basics and help you out.For all around fishing I`d recommend a 6'6'' spinning rod outfit,Bass Pro has decent combos at reasonable prices.Baits will depend on what you are after,if you want to dunk bait night crawlers and crickets will catch most species.Doughbait is good for catfish and carp.Warning-if you get addicted you may end up spending a lot on a fast bass boat and thousands of dollars on tackle,ask me how I know,lol.Watch the tv fishing shows,Infisherman and Bill Dance often have helpful info.
edit on 9-5-2018 by ridgerunner because: addition



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:25 PM
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Thanks for all the advice! Didnt catch anything today, but neither did anyone else I saw. The lake i fish is man made and there is no obvious signs above the water where the fishing are at and visibility stops after about 8 inches. I think the lake at its deepest is a little over a meter as i can see the top of a 55 gallon barrel on its side in it. Tomorrow im going to try a different lake that has reeds growing out of it and you can tell where something might live. Was switching between a hook with a neon grub and something like this...
www.walmart.com...



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 11:31 PM
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originally posted by: Whoisjohngalt
Thanks for all the advice! Didnt catch anything today, but neither did anyone else I saw. The lake i fish is man made and there is no obvious signs above the water where the fishing are at and visibility stops after about 8 inches. I think the lake at its deepest is a little over a meter as i can see the top of a 55 gallon barrel on its side in it. Tomorrow im going to try a different lake that has reeds growing out of it and you can tell where something might live. Was switching between a hook with a neon grub and something like this...
www.walmart.com...


You still had a good time tho, am i right
?

With waters that are man made and rather shallow, I highly recommend a top water frog, crank bait, or jerk bait. For tomorrow, you say there's plenty of visible vegetation like reeds? Get a top water frog! They're usually weedless, meaning the hooks are set a certain way as not to get caught up on brush, lily pads, or reeds! It is also the most fun bait to fish with, the strikes are so exhilarating!

Let us know how it goes tomorrow, patience is the key to fishing my brother!

Cheers,
-StS




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