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does a window AC unit use more juice than an electric heater unit?

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posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Depending on your budget you might want to look into whats called a mini-split system for your upstairs.




posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: Nyiah

Those tower units do the trick for us as well. Along with keeping the bedrooms dark during the day.

I tinted the windows upstairs and bought thermal blackout curtains over at Meijer. They don't exactly black anything out (I opted for tan ones) but they work damn well at insulating against the heat AND the cold. Excellent investment, they're something else for TST to consider.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:15 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Nyiah

Depending on your budget you might want to look into whats called a mini-split system for your upstairs.

That would be great, except we rent. If there's any kind of installation involved, it's no bueno



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

I work 3rds and bought the insulated black out curtains as well. They are black though and work great.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

For a heater, the heat produced is in ratio to energy of the electricity consumed.

For a heat pump, the heat produced is relative to the ambient temperature and the efficiency of the heat pump. The heat output is not related directly to the energy consumed. It can 'move around' far more, or far less, heat than the energy of the electricity consumed. Generally, heat pumps are designed for efficiency and can extract significant heat even from sub-zero conditions. As such, they usually represent a significantly lower cost to run than an electric heater.

Put simply, an electric heater turns power directly into heat. A heat pump moves around ambient heat. And they can cool by the same process.

Also, the cheapest solution may be insulation. Heavy thermal curtains for windows (and/or double glazing), batts in the ceiling and even panels on cold/hot walls.

edit on 8/5/2018 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

I am using Central Air Conditioning which uses the boiler for heating in winter.
I want electric radiators back. In winter the stupid boiler uses too much gas increasing gas bill overall. Boilers have too much hazards for a small house hold and increases chance of fire. Boilers also increases CO2 level which is even more stupid. I can tell because my house used to have radiators before it burned down and reconstructed into using boilers.

www.hgtv.com...



edit on 8-5-2018 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 08:46 PM
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Heaters suck up energy and literally just waste it into thin air, heating the space around it.
AC's are like refrigerators, they are meant to be run all the time and turn hot air into cool air. At the end of the day I think a fridge is more 'efficient'.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 09:52 PM
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A fridge has about three inches of foam insulation. Not much point in using air conditioning unless your home is well insulated.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 03:00 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Because basically a heater uses a fan to displace the heat,and AC unit uses a pump to pump freon thru the lines to cool off,your talking about 2 different units,running 2 motors on AC only 1 on heat



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 03:02 AM
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From your description it sounds like you have a gas furnace. So a large part of your energy bill would be from natural gas.

Go online to your energy providers website. Create an acct and you should be able to see a breakdown of energy used and costs per day.

A window A/C unit will most likely use more electricity than your furnace but your furnace was burning gas also (I am assuming)

and I found this...although if you have a 5000 watt unit, not 5000 btu, you can skip that first step

Air conditioner capacity is often described in British thermal units instead of amperage or wattage. To determine the cost to run a 5,000-Btu air conditioner, however, you'll have to know the amperage rating. In turn, you can convert that number to wattage. Once you know the wattage, you can find out the cost to run the air conditioner for an hour, a day, a week, a month or a year.

1
Locate the amperage of your 5,000-Btu air conditioner. There will generally be a tag on the bottom or inside the filter panel with the specifications that you need. Most 5,000-Btu air conditioning units are rated at around 5 amperes.

2
Calculate the wattage from the amperes. For example, multiply the 5-amp figure by how many volts there are at the outlet. In most cases this will be 110. Therefore, 5 x 110 = 550 watts. This figure will allow you to calculate your kilowatt-hours.

3
Find out what you are paying for each kilowatt-hour from your local electric company. The national average is approximately 12 cents.

4
Determine how much the air conditioner would cost to run over a 24-hour period. Use the basic formula of watts x hours of use ÷ 1,000 x cost per kilowatt-hour = cost of operation. (Dividing by 1,000 changes watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.) For example, in this case the mathematical formula looks like this: 550 x 24 ÷ 1,000 x $0.12. The cost to run a 5-amp, 5,000-Btu air conditioner over a 24-hour period is about $1.60.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 07:20 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
i know # about this stuff and dont really know who to ask.

my electric bill through the winter has been about $300. i have an all electric place and we had a bad winter so the heat was on all day/night for months. think central air but heat. i have a thermostat on the wall and vents in every room and the heat pumps through it all. o about 300 bones with all the other # running.

i was on the fence about running a window AC unit this summer because i wanted to try and reduce my electric bill but my house is already stupid hot. so i just put a 5000 BTU AC window unit in and have it on now. i know that wont work for the entire house(about 1k sq ft) but i have another 5,000 BTU one coming my way in a few weeks.

these are not new units so i dont think they are the up to date energy efficient #.

i have absolutely o idea how to figure out how much this is going to cost vs the heat.

can anyone that knows about this kind of # give me an opinion and maybe a general idea?

does 1 of these units running the same amount of time as the heater use the same amount of juice/cost as much?
what if i have 2 running the same amount of time?

i would like to not have $300 bills all summer but we need to have air man.

last year my landlord said he was selling the house we were renting after 4 years so we had to put together a move in 2 months time cause my daughter was about to start kindergarten and we needed to settle.

so i got the brilliant idea of hey, lets move into this #ing trailer for a year because we will be able to save a little cash.
well this dumb ass trailer is costing me more money because the crazy electric bill.
i screwed myself. i just need to get to next March then we are out.

so i guess bottom line question to all of you with more experience than me is will 1/2 of these units cost the same amount, more or less per month than the heater.

for the record i had the Ohio energy commission investigate my electric bill and usage because i just did not think it was correct but they said it was.

thanks



I use a med. sz rm air cond. placed straight down the hall to front door from back bedroom.

FYI: place 1-even 2 box fans in your house in-line w conditioner to help pull cool air... then the air can run on and off while the fans circ. the cool air. *

*We have 3 bedroom
edit on 9-5-2018 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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1 BTU/hr = 0.29307107 Watts
5000 BTU + 1465.35535 Watts
a reply to: TinySickTears


edit on 9-5-2018 by gimcrackery because: add information

edit on 9-5-2018 by gimcrackery because: add information



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 09:16 AM
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In general, a central AC unit is going to run with a thermostat to tell it when to kick on the compressor, etc. So, this, vs. a constantly running window unit, is generally going to be cheaper to run.

As others said, there are variables. Cooling the whole place for example, with central, vs. cooling one closed room with a wall unit, for example. In this case, keeping the one room cool would likely be cheaper, but again, all the variables.

Most folks just love the convenience though, of setting a temp and forgetting about it.



posted on May, 10 2018 @ 08:50 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
In general, a central AC unit is going to run with a thermostat to tell it when to kick on the compressor, etc. So, this, vs. a constantly running window unit, is generally going to be cheaper to run.

As others said, there are variables. Cooling the whole place for example, with central, vs. cooling one closed room with a wall unit, for example. In this case, keeping the one room cool would likely be cheaper, but again, all the variables.

Most folks just love the convenience though, of setting a temp and forgetting about it.


He also has to take in how much air leakage the building has when it comes to the building envelope. Windows AC requires open window. Majority Windows AC I see are constantly running compare to Central AC. When it comes to being extremely hot and wanting to cool the whole house, Central is better and cheaper to be honest. I wouldn't recommend using Central for heating because it uses too much gas, go for alternative is a lot cheaper. It is easier to survive the cold than the heat because nothing can protect against heat unless its cold water.

I would rather have high electric bills than gas bill. Gas requires pipelines and has more danger to it. Gas bills tend to be a lot higher than electric bills where I am living at.
edit on 10-5-2018 by makemap because: (no reason given)




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