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Alaska's Missing

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posted on May, 5 2018 @ 09:07 AM
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Oh it's a well known fact that loads of Organs for transplants come from Alaska, ask anyone.




posted on May, 5 2018 @ 11:37 AM
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Or maybe it's just a harsh and desolate environment without a lot if humans around to save your sorry butt when you do something stupid. No paranormal, UFOs, or monsters required.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: blend57

What some people don't know is that Nome sits on the edge of the Alaskan triangle. Not only is it within the zone, it is the place where most of the missing person cases have been reported or so it's said.


Cool stories, and I'm going to appreciate them for the folklore they are, but I think you got your Nome info wrong (unless there's a second, lesser known Nome out-of-staters don't know about) Nome is definitely NOT where you appear to think it is, it's on the Bering Sea coast. If you know where St Lawrence Island is, look NE a bit on the coast. Or in miles terms, it's about 550 miles NW of Anchorage.
Your Triangle on the map is way, way east of there, it's nowhere near it, and certainly not on the edge.
Also, there's less than 4,000 people, not 9,300. I think it's census area (which is called Nome Census Area) has a population of 9,000, but certainly not Nome itself.

I'm sure our Alaska residents could clear that up a bit better if they spot it, but it seemed like a glaring oversight for a town hundreds of miles from the Triangle area proposed.
edit on 5/5/2018 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: blend57

Whew!!

I thought Alaska was missing!

That would suck.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

Cool stories, and I'm going to appreciate them for the folklore they are, but I think you got your Nome info wrong (unless there's a second, lesser known Nome out-of-staters don't know about) Nome is definitely NOT where you appear to think it is, it's on the Bering Sea coast. If you know where St Lawrence Island is, look NE a bit on the coast. Or in miles terms, it's about 550 miles NW of Anchorage.
Your Triangle on the map is way, way east of there, it's nowhere near it, and certainly not on the edge.
Also, there's less than 4,000 people, not 9,300. I think it's census area (which is called Nome Census Area) has a population of 9,000, but certainly not Nome itself.

I'm sure our Alaska residents could clear that up a bit better if they spot it, but it seemed like a glaring oversight for a town hundreds of miles from the Triangle area proposed.


Yep.. you are right! I did get it messed up and thanks a ton for pointing it out! Very hard to do the research and keep things on track from your cell phone.

Thanks again for correcting that for me! I appreciate the help.

blend



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: blend57

Catch me holding court at the Glacier Brewhouse as I am often there making bad puns!

After settling in, be safe but go see the country. The simple to reach are first. But then do a bit of roaming. It will do your soul some good!

And yet another ATS member in AK... *Charlie Brown eyes*

Happy Cinco de Mayo! And don’t freak out that we also love the Kentucky Derby!! It is how we roll! lol.



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 02:39 AM
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Considering how many experienced hikers and outdoorsman go missing in relatively safe climates, I have no doubt that many of these deaths are due to hubris, alcohol and human error (and of course weather/the occasional animal attack). You get lost where I live search teams aren't going to have as much trouble finding you, even if you've perished, and the climate is pretty decent for survival. Alaska not so much. The body would likely be gone in incredibly short order considering the locale and wildlife, not to mention weather conditions. I think one of the problems with people who know what they're doing is that they get a little cavalier and overconfident in their abilities, and will take greater risk.

Isn't there also a fairly disturbing amount of alcohol abuse? Get drunk, go for a hike/snowmobile ride and you're in for a world of hurt.

I can see Alaska being very tempting for the blossoming serial killer. Help can be so far away it's almost unimaginable to me living in the PNW, and we have some pretty vast areas of wilderness. It would be incredibly easy to hide a body out there, and the fact that it's such a dangerous area would go far to allay suspicion of foul play.


Proportional to its population, Alaska is, without a doubt, the most popular state among serial killers, with 15.65 serial killings per one million inhabitants. A total of 51 serial murders took place in Alaska between 1900 and 2014, with more than half of those occurring between 1980 and 1990. The activities of serial killers spiked in the 1980s, and Alaska led the nation in serial killer murders during this decade. Experts have suggested a number of theories to account for why Alaska produces and houses so many serial killers.


[url=https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Navigation/Community/Arcadia-and-THP-Blog/August-2017/Which-State-Has-Produced-the-Most-Serial-Killers]Link[/ur l]

I have no doubt that the number of known serial killings is FAR eclipsed by the actual number. No body (which seems pretty easy to accomplish there) means no known cause of could look for death, and certainly no way to establish a signature. I suppose they could compile a list of commonalities between missing persons, but those missing persons would probably all have a risky lifestyle. Prostitutes, vagrants, drug users and the like are common victims, and sadly not much is always done when they go missing because it's assumed the lifestyle contributed to their missing status.

I don't think their is some giant otter running around snatching people up. I would also like to see what all the missing people had in common, I would think many could be lumped into two distinct groups. People living off the land/trapping/hunting etc and those that were involved in other risky behavior like drug use, prostitution. Of course there will be outliers.

I think this thread is very intriguing, but I'm fairly skeptical anything else is really going on. Reminds me of the Highway of Tears. The most logical explanation is that the poor women's lifestyles put them in danger. I don't think there's one serial killer out there that's to blame (though it wouldn't surprise me if some were victims) and I don't think it's bigfoot. Either way, it's incredibly sad and I wish we had some more advocates for people in their situations.

I'm hoping with time and technology we'll be able to narrow in on who is at risk, and put things in place to mitigate that risk somewhat. At the same time, I think a lot of people move to, or live in Alaska BECAUSE of the risk. I'm obviously not talking about the people in cities, but I'm also not just talking about the homesteader types.

Great thread OP!



posted on May, 6 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Domo1
Considering how many experienced hikers and outdoorsman go missing in relatively safe climates, I have no doubt that many of these deaths are due to hubris, alcohol and human error (and of course weather/the occasional animal attack). You get lost where I live search teams aren't going to have as much trouble finding you, even if you've perished, and the climate is pretty decent for survival. Alaska not so much. The body would likely be gone in incredibly short order considering the locale and wildlife, not to mention weather conditions. I think one of the problems with people who know what they're doing is that they get a little cavalier and overconfident in their abilities, and will take greater risk.

Isn't there also a fairly disturbing amount of alcohol abuse? Get drunk, go for a hike/snowmobile ride and you're in for a world of hurt.

I can see Alaska being very tempting for the blossoming serial killer. Help can be so far away it's almost unimaginable to me living in the PNW, and we have some pretty vast areas of wilderness. It would be incredibly easy to hide a body out there, and the fact that it's such a dangerous area would go far to allay suspicion of foul play.


Proportional to its population, Alaska is, without a doubt, the most popular state among serial killers, with 15.65 serial killings per one million inhabitants. A total of 51 serial murders took place in Alaska between 1900 and 2014, with more than half of those occurring between 1980 and 1990. The activities of serial killers spiked in the 1980s, and Alaska led the nation in serial killer murders during this decade. Experts have suggested a number of theories to account for why Alaska produces and houses so many serial killers.


[url=https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Navigation/Community/Arcadia-and-THP-Blog/August-2017/Which-State-Has-Produced-the-Most-Serial-Killers]Link[/ur l]

I have no doubt that the number of known serial killings is FAR eclipsed by the actual number. No body (which seems pretty easy to accomplish there) means no known cause of could look for death, and certainly no way to establish a signature. I suppose they could compile a list of commonalities between missing persons, but those missing persons would probably all have a risky lifestyle. Prostitutes, vagrants, drug users and the like are common victims, and sadly not much is always done when they go missing because it's assumed the lifestyle contributed to their missing status.

I don't think their is some giant otter running around snatching people up. I would also like to see what all the missing people had in common, I would think many could be lumped into two distinct groups. People living off the land/trapping/hunting etc and those that were involved in other risky behavior like drug use, prostitution. Of course there will be outliers.

I think this thread is very intriguing, but I'm fairly skeptical anything else is really going on. Reminds me of the Highway of Tears. The most logical explanation is that the poor women's lifestyles put them in danger. I don't think there's one serial killer out there that's to blame (though it wouldn't surprise me if some were victims) and I don't think it's bigfoot. Either way, it's incredibly sad and I wish we had some more advocates for people in their situations.

I'm hoping with time and technology we'll be able to narrow in on who is at risk, and put things in place to mitigate that risk somewhat. At the same time, I think a lot of people move to, or live in Alaska BECAUSE of the risk. I'm obviously not talking about the people in cities, but I'm also not just talking about the homesteader types.

Great thread OP!

Yea I' m more inclined to believe it is serial killers in almost all large number of missing people in all the states. A lot of times law enforcement doesn't want to investigate that angle because to do that means putting a lot of man hours and money into an investigation that usually ends up fruitless. It is a sad state of affairs because families deserve to know the truth. I use to love camping but it has become increasingly dangerous nowadays. Never know what you might run into.



posted on May, 7 2018 @ 06:50 AM
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GREAT THREAD. Shold have put this in Paranormal or UFO forums it would have got a lot more attention



posted on May, 7 2018 @ 07:05 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I would imagine some percentage could be explained by bears.
Get drunk and wander off the beaten path, get stomped by a moose, a bear eats you.


Grizzly bears definitely account for some of the missing



posted on May, 7 2018 @ 09:29 AM
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It's pretty simple. Even experienced folks can easily get lost when all you see is white. In addition, experience isn't going to do jack against Hypothermia. I lived in Alaska as a kid, for a few years, and man....there are a TON of times we could have very easily died (looking back, it's much easier to see it).... From falling down a cliff, or into a half frozen lake, or just not finding our way home, clawed to death by Kodiaks, etc. (we lived in a military compound, but would always sneak out of it onto the neighboring mountain). I mean, we were Boy Scouts, and knew how to survive and all, but yeah, I can see why so many go missing.



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