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Wet Rocks on Mars or Not

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posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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Here's an interesting image that just came in from Mars Sol 2036. We've had these kinds of images before where it looks like there's water or something on the surface, but it was probably just different colored sand mixing together. This image shows that same kind of darker sand, but it also seems to be darkening up the actual rocks. What do you suppose is up with that?

mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 2-5-2018 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:10 PM
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Havent there been few discoverys of water on mars lately?

Under the soil?

Im on my phone link later.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:13 PM
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I am not seeing anything in this image that looks like wetness...

However I do see some areas that look like fossilization.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

The sand does look wet at first glance. That being said, I think it is just the sand color that gives the effect.

Note the rock in the top right that has a small amount of sand on top of it, as well as sunlight shining upon it. It is the same color as the rest of the sand in image. If there was significant moisture in this area, I think we would see a different shade in the sands per evaporation and such.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:37 PM
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I didn't check which area the pic was taken from but summer temps near the equator have been recorded above 70 Fahrenheit numerous times.

However liquid water on Mars behaves much like dry ice on Earth due to the thin atmosphere.

Under the right conditions it could possibly last a bit longer on the modern surface, but I have not heard of any such find.

What I really want to know is where that Mars methane is coming from. Is Mars geologically active, or is something else going on under the surface? The methane spikes durring the summer season when more of the ice melts...



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:38 PM
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That white mineral vein is pretty neat though.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: abeverage
I am not seeing anything in this image that looks like wetness...

I'm looking mostly at these spots. Darkening without the dark sand. Just wondering.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Isn't that just the way the light is being reflected because that's another face on the rock?

The sand looks pretty smooth though, would be nice if their was some water... And some deckchairs, maybe a cocktail bar too.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
The sand looks pretty smooth though, would be nice if their was some water... And some deckchairs, maybe a cocktail bar too.

If it was a little more dull gray, it would be like California sand.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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Could be an magnetic effect. With an atmospheric pressure of 0.6% of Earth's and low temperatures, water can't exist on Mars. If there was water it would sublimate from ice to vapor.

NASA scientist state, water vapor has been detected in the atmosphere but it is small compared Earth. Earth has thousands of times more water vapor in the atmosphere than Mars.
edit on 2-5-2018 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:29 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
Isn't that just the way the light is being reflected because that's another face on the rock?

That's what it looks like to me too.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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According to Rummel, the humidity of Mars is tied to temperature fluctuations. At night, relative humidity levels can rise to 80 to 100 percent, with the air sometimes reaching atmospheric saturation. The daytime air is far drier, due to warmer temperatures


From what I am reading on a few scientific type sites, the images from Mars could easily reveal dampness from water in places.
Is Mars wet



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: RAY1990
Isn't that just the way the light is being reflected because that's another face on the rock?

That's what it looks like to me too.

I guess I'm just not seeing it, because to me the rocks look relatively smooth in those areas, and not like they are facets with greater shadows. That's why I posted it. Not saying you're not right, but I'm having a hard time seeing that.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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huh weird, looks like an shadow



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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It's also possible that it's a two tone rock, like this one, from the same sol.




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:57 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: abeverage
I am not seeing anything in this image that looks like wetness...

I'm looking mostly at these spots. Darkening without the dark sand. Just wondering.


The darker area that your arrows are pointing to appears to be a shadow from another rock just out of frame. It doesn't appear to indicate an area of moisture. It's hard tp say from a picture though. It would be much easer to tell with a sample of the material or at the very least, knowledge of what type of rock it is and what minerals are present within it because it could be something as simple as part of the material is exposed due to erosion and we're simply seeing and area uncovered by recent erosion where it appears darker whereas the lighter areas have been exposed to the elements and have eroded to a higher degree. Again, it's really difficult to make a good judgement on it based soley on a photo with no context regarding what the geology of that particular area consists of.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

You know,
I just like to look at Mars rocks, so star and flag for that.


it doesn't really look dark enough to be a shadow if comparing to other shadows in the picture, but that could just be the way the sun is there.
It does kind of look wet, but then again, it could be shadows.
Cool no matter what it is though,
Thanks for sharing!



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

That is a cool rock formation.
If only we could hold a piece of it!

Sorry, the rock geek in me had to say something.


It could very well be two toned rock.
The image seems to light for shadow.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: Darkblade71
it doesn't really look dark enough to be a shadow if comparing to other shadows in the picture, but that could just be the way the sun is there.

I don't think it's really a shadow, only a slight difference in angle for that part that makes it get slightly less light, appearing darker.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: Darkblade71

Yes, I would love to get one of those too.


It reminds me of clay.



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