It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Does anyone else thinks English language is getting more difficult?

page: 2
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 2 2018 @ 05:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: makemap
The population is in faqt, becoming stupiderer.


Well said.




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:09 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

Ellipses rule... No need to be a ball breaker and make me feel like an complete idiot, for constantly using it in the wrong context.

... lol.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 06:11 PM
link   
I haven't seem much change with the English language, if anything I'd have to say it's becoming easier to learn as less people write formally.

Pick up a book from 100 years ago and compare it to modern day literature, you'll find that the use of language is becoming simplified and less common words are being used even less.

Personally I was always pretty useless grammatically, though I've always been decent in terms of spelling. Like others I do notice how poor people are in terms of variaty and quality when it comes to spelling and the use of words.

Practice makes perfect though so stick at it.

Somebody said I'd make a good writer the other day, I didn't half laugh... Yeah, for remarks like that I have to say the quality of language being used is surely going down hill.

Btw, 19th century immigrants probably seldom ever wrote. So they're not exactly the best group for comparison.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:09 PM
link   
It's obviously hard for the OP.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
Most people like to throw them around for stylistic reasons (I do it too to be honest). The ellipses' intended purposes is not to signal a dramatic pause unless you are a novelist writing dialogue or a first person point of view. In formal writing, it is used to signal that you have cut out part of quoted text.


I probably use them more than anyone else on ATS, at least if we're only counting the usage of them within paragraphs rather than at the end of lists of one line comments. Not real sure why I do it or when I started doing it. I often write technical engineering reports and never even have the thought or urge to use them. If I had to guess, I'd say I subconsciously associate them with a more conversational tone of writing.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:26 PM
link   
they say english is the hardest to learn becouse it changes every day



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:26 PM
link   
Are you saying that this is your second time learning English and it was easier the first time?



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:28 PM
link   
if you talk to teenagers today even i cant understand their words



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: schuyler
It's obviously hard for the OP.


I don't understand what OP means. Educate me bro.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:14 PM
link   
Based on your post English and Life seem generally difficult for you. Knowledge is Power. Increase your vocabulary and learn words such as verisimilitude or superfluous, which describe your predicament.
a reply to: makemap




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bone75
No, the populous is just getting dumber.


*populace




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:29 PM
link   
I agree with the Op if he/she is saying we should care more about what is said and less about how it is said.

I have seen great thoughts picked apart by people who just need the perfect grammar. Why? If you understand what is being said and it is written or spoken in nonoffensive language, why not just try and understand.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:34 PM
link   
I attribute part of it to the "whole language" approach to teaching language arts/English. It was big when I was in the classroom. The idea was that kids were supposed to receive mini-lessons in grammar, but not any real in-depth instruction into things like punctuation, grammar, and spelling or vocabulary. These were things they were supposed to learn through a mysterious osmosis that would occur if you got them to read enough good examples of writing.

And while I will admit that to a certain extent I have picked up quite a bit from what I have read, I am also a voracious reader and always have been reading well above my grade level and for much longer than I was required to by my school requirements. I *gasp* read for pleasure so much that I simply read automatically without thinking about it just about anything I see, even ingredients on a shampoo bottle, and I've been that way from a young age.

Most children aren't going to be that way.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:40 PM
link   
English ain't my native language and I'm doin': just fine.
English is not my native tongue. I am doing alright, all right.

Universities and grammar police are ruining communication for those who don't go to and can't afford to go to universities.
The standards have been slowly changing with their in the box and never out of the box policies. Everything must be done the same.
Keep the sheep in line, no one is unique except the few that know how to exploit the policies of standards.

In the past, those who wrote books usually got excellent grammar education but wrote within their own free style. Hence, making them unique.
In the present everything is written in a line dancing watch out not to fall type of style.
Blame the educational system, blame the mainstream "cool" science guys/gals, blame the news and blame the wealthiest who guide it all. Or better yet, blame it on money and the evil that controls the evil that mankind does.
edit on 2/5/18 by Sump3 because: Ah, I had guilt for my tongue in cheek response (first paragraph)



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 09:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Sump3

No.

English has the same 8 parts of speech: noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, pronoun, conjunction, interjection.

Every word in the language fits at least one of those 8 parts; some can satisfy the requirements of being more than one part depending on how they are used.

Grammar has the same structure: subject - predicate, or a noun or pronoun carrying out an action (verb). All the other parts work around those base blocks to create the astounding variety of forms that can create a sentence.

Those basic truths were the same in the days you pine for as they are today. What is lacking today is the creativity and vocabulary needed to independently produce all those forms and the level of general literacy in the population required to understand them once produced.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 09:38 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

That's also what I was trying to articulate. But failed.

It has become clear to me I am not as skillful in my second tongue as I have supposed up until now.
Just kidding.

It clearly eluded me to make that point clear.
Thank you.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 03:57 AM
link   
a reply to: SATURN66

Sorry to say that isn't true.

The hardest second languages to learn in the world in order of difficulty are;

1. Cantonese (8 tones, evolves more quickly than English due to tight geographic confines, southern China)
2. Mandarin (4 tones, various dialects, illogical dropping of key contextual words)
(Both have the bonus of having romanization systems that are nearly a language in and of themselves)
3. Arabic (4 written forms of letters, vowels not in written form, very difficult to translate as well)
4. Japanese (3 different writing systems, multiple forms of each verb which include tense and context)
5. Russian (alphabet, can't remember other reasons at the moment)
6. Korean (sentence form - subject object action, I water drink, very unique language in many ways)
7. Finnish (terribly complex grammar rules)
8. Navajo (descriptions delivered via verb forms)
9. English (we r ez 2 lern)

Ever wonder why "ma" is the first thing most babies around the world say (and it's also almost universally accepted as mother/mom)? It's the easiest syllable for our vocal cords to produce at that age.

I wer a English teechr b4.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 08:00 AM
link   
a reply to: makemap



It is no wonder 19th century immigrants find it a lot easier to learn English than today


I would guess 19th century immigrants find it harder to learn English today is because its really hard to learn anything when you are dead.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 08:05 AM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko



What is lacking today is the creativity and vocabulary needed to independently produce all those forms and the level of general literacy in the population required to understand them once produced.


Whats lacking today is Primary school teachers that can actually teach English. By the time my Grandmother graduated High School in 1926, she had an education equivalent to today's graduation from a Community College. In those days, they put much emphasis on Grammer and the proper use of English.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 08:16 AM
link   
a reply to: SATURN66
Haha (or "lol"), that´s not what "they say".. English is relative easy. Try French, German or Mandarin.. you have to learn one definitve article and it´s "the".

Try 3 for German, 5 for french and then learn what article to use for the word you pick.... English is not hard, it´s very easy in the sense of what you have to learn.

If you however learned two other languages before english, it´s kind of complicated again... That being said, I doubt any pure english speaker (as in, only knows one language) has a clue how primitive english really is.

And that again, is the reason why I use english for comments when I write code as a German. It´s short and descriptive.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join