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C-130 down in Savannah

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posted on May, 5 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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According to Pedro Sanabria, a friend of the co-pilot, 1st Lt David Albandoz, the Lt didn't want to fly the aircraft on the day of the accident. He said they barely made it to Savannah from Nashville on a previous flight, and they should disassemble the aircraft in Savannah and truck it to the Boneyard.

www.prinforma.com...




posted on May, 5 2018 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Pretty damning about thoughts about the aircraft. I know its NG but thats a hell of a lot of SNCOs for a bone yard flight.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: Pyle

They still have 64 and 65 birds in their unit. They are the oldest aircraft still operational.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 08:20 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Pyle

They still have 64 and 65 birds in their unit. They are the oldest aircraft still operational.


I worked on some 57 tankers but they spent so much time on alert so it kept the stress low.

C-130s though have been flown raw since the beginning.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: Pyle

And these are former Weather birds to boot.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Good lord those should have flown straight to the bone yard as soon as they were done being weather chasers. I cant imagine the stresses on the airframe.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 06:56 PM
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The Air Force announced a service wide, 24 hour stand down. Units not in combat zones have until May 21st to complete it. Involved will be a Commander's Call, in which they will discuss ways to make operations safer with enlisted personnel.



posted on May, 8 2018 @ 07:11 PM
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Just heard through the grapevine that this aircraft had at least one deferred PDM due to budget constraints. It might have been two, but if it was, there's no way in hell that plane should have been flying in the first place.



posted on May, 9 2018 @ 04:01 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
The Air Force announced a service wide, 24 hour stand down. Units not in combat zones have until May 21st to complete it. Involved will be a Commander's Call, in which they will discuss ways to make operations safer with enlisted personnel.


I don't know... more bodies, make sure the maintainers get time off on occasion, make certain they have all the parts needed.
Hold people accountable to the standards, when I joined if you had a full single page of deferred maintenance on the buff you had to explain why, my last day on the flight line in 2014 you could have multiple pages and nobody cared as long as the preflight was signed off for that days flier.

Oh and shoot the next general that says we need to do more with less... immediately and without trial, because 20 years of the bean counters saying that while we fought two wars is directly responsible for the aviation problems we have been seeing.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 10:44 AM
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Experienced C-130 pilots have analyzed the crash video and say it appears that they lost at least one engine, if not both of the left wing. If they lost both, they would have lost the hydraulic boost pumps that attach to the flight controls. As one pilot put it, when both engines failed, they lost power steering. When the wing dropped, they were having to try to recover using brute strength.

www.military.com...



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 06:09 PM
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Delivering a plane to the boneyard can't be a priority. Why not wait for maintenance?



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: gariac

They had undergone maintenance at Savannah, either several days, or several weeks depending on the source. Anything that isn't a Safety Of Flight issue isn't going to be fixed on a Boneyard flight. If they were taking off and attempting the flight, the everyone that needed to sign off on the flight was satisfied that it was safe to fly. That indicates that whatever went wrong was sudden.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 09:12 PM
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www.c-130hercules.net...

I can't find the original story. Of course landing means you had some altitude to play with, which isn't the same thing as a take off.



posted on May, 21 2018 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: gariac

The news channel doesn't have it anymore.

airsoc.com...

They had a prop leak in #1 and oil leak in #2. They were already configuring for landing because they had flaps at 50% when they lost the second engine. Otherwise they wouldn't have been able to get them down at all.
edit on 5/21/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2018 @ 01:12 PM
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The report is out. I'm still reading the full report, but there were many screwups by many people that shouldn't have made them.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:36 AM
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On several flights prior to the Mishap Flight, the aircraft experienced a slight rpm drop on the number one engine (approximately 1% lower than the #4 engine). The aircraft was flown to Savannah for scheduled fuel cell maintenance, and was originally scheduled to return to Puerto Rico afterwards. Upon landing in Savannah, the Mishap Crew wrote the aircraft up for #1 engine RPM dropping to 96% upon switching the synchrophaser master switch off. They believed it returned to normal when switching to mechanical governing. After completing repairs a crew arrived to troubleshoot the engine, and make any required repairs.

The maintenance crew arrived without an Accu-Tach, which is required to verify engine RPM issues, so they borrowed one from the local unit. It was a different unit than the one they normally used, and they were unaware that it had an adapter to fit their aircraft, so they failed to use it. During the first engine run, the crew noticed the same problem with the engine, but were unable to get the engine over 96%, regardless of how it was governed. The first step was to verify the gauge was operating correctly. This is usually done by changing the gauge with one known to be working. Instead of shutting down the engines, the crew changed the RPM gauge with the gauge from the #2 engine while the engines were running. The swapped gauge showed 96% still.

After completing the first engine run, the crew made the decision to adjust the engine one valve housing. They made a 12 click adjustment to the housing, which should have increased the RPMs to 99%, which was within range of the T.O. requirements. During the second engine run, the maintenance crew said they observed 99%, but the DFDR showed 96.8% sustained, and fluctuations between 95-98%. The T.O. calls for 99.8-100.2% on the precision tach, or 98-102% on the aircraft gauge. The CVR showed the crew calling for an additional four clicks, but then discussing that doing so would require another engine run, so it was never performed.

During the takeoff roll, engine #1 fluctuated between 94-98% RPM, and never reached the required takeoff RPMs. The Flight Manual calls for the crew to abort the takeoff if any of the engines malfunction before decision speed is reached. The aircraft was at 64 knots when the FE called "Power Set". Eight seconds prior to rotation, #1 dropped to 65%, and 1971 inch pounds of torque (normal for takeoff is over 18,000). Engine thrust had dropped to under 300 HP, down from over 4,000. Just before rotation, the pilot applied 25 degrees of right rudder to keep the aircraft on the centerline. The aircraft almost left the runway right before rotation.

The crew failed to follow the Engine Shutdown procedure, or follow the Takeoff Continued After Engine Failure, or After Takeoff Checklists. The flaps were never retracted, and were left at 50 degrees. They began a left turn into the dead engine, but failed to maintain anything close to required airspeed for flight. Three engine climb speed was calculated at 158 KIAS, and it was estimated that a left bank would require 166 KIAS. The MA never achieved higher than 131 KIAS. The aircraft went into a 19 degree left bank, and the MP input left rudder, contrary to what the Flight Manual indicated, resulting in the aircraft going into a skid, and departing controlled flight. The aircraft reached 52.2 degrees nose low, where it performed a left barrel roll, and impacted the ground in an upright position, with a northerly heading.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 08:57 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

In the died we had a crew lose an engine on takeoff roll really close to rotate, it was heavy weight going to the Stan to do left turns.

They kept it on the deck made it off onto the taxi way and we were rushed out there, we got there as the tires deflated. The crew was non-stop apologizing till we asked what happened, they said the plane tried to jerk to the left.

So we went over and looked, sure enough #1 shelled out, walked back over and shook the Lt's and th Capt's hands saying good call #1 was toast, Brakes and are easy to replace, crews and planes are not.

seems like crew coordination, and a willingness to say no are being trained out of the crews now a days.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Yeah, CRM is dying again. It's going to take something significant to bring it back. All of these guys were highly experienced, with all the maintenance guys being 5 and 7 levels, and the flight crews with quite a few hours. I was surprised at the lack of knowledge that seemed to be displayed here.



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 03:58 PM
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im wondering if there was pressure from higher up the food chain to get the herc to the Scrap Yard no matter what..



posted on Nov, 11 2018 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

From what I've heard, it was more pressure from the pilot to get it there.



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