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C-130 down in Savannah

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posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:37 AM
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The FAA has confirmed that a C-130 has crashed in Savannah, Georgia. The aircraft impacted near Highway 21 in Savannah. It belongs to the Air National Guard, but no word on casualties or anything else yet.

www.google.com...

They had just taken off heading to Davis Monthan in Arizona. There were five people on board.

Reports are that it belonged to the 165th Airlift Wing based at the Savannah airport.

Haven't seen anything official but word on the grapevine is at least two fatalities.

edit on 5/2/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/2/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/2/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I understand our aircraft are aging and what not but this is getting a little worrisome as we seem to have a bird or two a week lately falling out of the sky.

Is something else going on that the public isn't aware of?



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Found this on YT



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:43 AM
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Higher operational tempo means higher accident tempo.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:44 AM
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That's sad and I hope there was a chance for the crew to survive this. It makes me wonder if it's a mechanical issue or human error. The weather in GA is fine so that couldn't have been a factor.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: Cygnis

The 158th Airlift Squadron, which is the unit the aircraft belonged to, flies the C-130H. They got them new from Lockheed in 1981 and 82. They're well maintained, but old and tired.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

It was just after takeoff, so there's a chance, but the pictures being released don't look good.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:55 AM
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They just confirmed two fatalities. No word on the other three people.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaphod, odd question, but how much would an electrical field such as what is produced from our planet effect an aircraft?

Fluctuations and what not in said field have any effect?



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: Cygnis
a reply to: Zaphod58

I understand our aircraft are aging and what not but this is getting a little worrisome as we seem to have a bird or two a week lately falling out of the sky.

Is something else going on that the public isn't aware of?


That was my first thought, too. Maybe we're just a couple of conspiracy theorist nut-jobs, but at some point coincidence begins to run real damn thin.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: Cygnis

Little to none. Military aircraft are designed to operate in some pretty extreme EM environments.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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originally posted by: RadioRobert
Higher operational tempo means higher accident tempo.


I can't see where higher operational tempo compensates for the number of incidents of late. If the "operational tempo" for airline flights had this kind of ration of "accident tempo," nobody would dare travel by air.

Something is amiss somewhere.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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originally posted by: RadioRobert
Higher operational tempo means higher accident tempo.


I can't see where higher operational tempo compensates for the number of incidents of late. If the "operational tempo" for airline flights had this kind of ration of "accident tempo," nobody would dare travel by air.

Something is amiss somewhere.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I was a little hopeful for the crew until I saw the video with the twitter pic Keeping my fingers crossed that someone got out before it went up in flames. It makes me sad every time I see a C-130 go down and I almost feel guilty for being thankful it wasn’t anyone local to me on this bird. I spent a lot of time getting ferried around in thesein the Army and a good friend and childhood mentor was a crew chief on one that flew out of Stratton ANG. HE TRIED LINE HELL TO TALK ME OUT OF ENLISTING IN THE army and going with the air force. In hindsight, I would have had a longer career and wouldn’t have severe arthritis in my hips and spine. But that’s neither here nor there... my thoughts go out to the families of the crew on yet another sad day.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

The average age of the entire Air Force inventory is something like 26-28. We have aircraft flying that are in their 60s, and have been asking them to fly every day, in an insane operations tempo, that has resulted in maintenance being deferred, aircraft pushed beyond their designed life cycle, etc. And now we're seeing the results of that.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

Airlines are flying from point A to point B in a straight line. These are military aircraft that fly low level, pull high Gs that put a lot of strain on the airframe (not this one but others). Airlines have extra aircraft available, so when maintenence comes due, they can do it. We have so many commitments right now that we need as many aircraft flying as we can keep flying. So things get pushed back.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

AS I would hope they would be.

Just frustrating to see so many birds coming down in various places across the country.

Kind'a got me thinking of the movie "The Core".



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

A Southwest flight had an emergency landing today as well for a window that cracked.

The second one within a month time frame. The last one involved a person being partially sucked out and resulted in a fatality.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: Cygnis

In 2016, the Air Force wide mission capable rate, meaning aircraft that were ready to fly at any given time, had dropped to 72.1%. In 2017 it was down to 71.3%. The only reason it was that high is because of the MQ-1 (now withdrawn from service) and MQ-9 averaging in the low 90% range.




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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I'm hearing that an engine went out, they tried to RTB but didn't make it




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