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The CPU market sucks in my POV

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posted on Apr, 30 2018 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: tribal


So here's my question. If back in 1999 i was using already OLD equipment to do pretty much EVERYTHING im doing now whats the deal with computers now that can barely run the SAME programs that i ran easily back then and didnt constantly ask for or require updates every damn time i turned the thing on?


But you could not pretty much everything you can do now.

Remember video editing back then? No, you don't, because you did not do video editing back then.

Photoshop or paintshop pro? Nah, I bet you did not use it, because then you would remember the hours of rendering, that today takes seconds.

Remember the games? No, not just the resolution - that usually vas limited to at most SVGA, less than a fourth of the resolution of 1080p - but the pixel count, frame rate, the lack of physics, the limitations, the limited AI, and, by god, the loading time!

Remember the power consumption? If you did any real work it was insane! You might think back at the mighty pentium 4 and think that it had a TDP of just around 80 watt (though the EE went up to 110 Watt!). It does not sound that bad - but then you factor in for how long the CPU was maxed out and you almost start to cry!

Remember how a 0.03 TB drive would set you back at least $200 and could only hold 3 to 7 DVDs, and you had to settle for the painfully slow 5400 RPM drives?

Do you remember the network transfor times and how, if you were lucky enough to be on anything more than a 10 Mbps network, they were essentially CPU (or bus) limited, and how you could not really use the computer while the transfer was in progress?


I think you have simply forgotten both how horrible the overall experience on those machines was compared to today's machines and how expensive and inefficient they were.

edit on 30-4-2018 by DupontDeux because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 30 2018 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: DupontDeux

originally posted by: tribal


So here's my question. If back in 1999 i was using already OLD equipment to do pretty much EVERYTHING im doing now whats the deal with computers now that can barely run the SAME programs that i ran easily back then and didnt constantly ask for or require updates every damn time i turned the thing on?
/quote]

But you could not pretty much everything you can do now.

Remember video editing back then? No, you don't, because you did not do video editing back then.

Photoshop or paintshop pro? Nah, I bet you did not use it, because then you would remember the hours of rendering, that today takes seconds.

Remember the games? No, not just the resolution - that usually vas limited to at most SVGA, less than a fourth of the resolution of 1080p - but the pixel count, frame rate, the lack of physics, the limitations, the limited AI, and, by god, the loading time!

Remember the power consumption? If you did any real work it was insane! You might think back at the mighty pentium 4 and think that it had a TDP of just around 80 watt (though the EE went up to 110 Watt!). It does not sound that bad - but then you factor in for how long the CPU was maxed out and you almost start to cry!

Remember how a 0.03 TB drive would set you back at least $200 and could only hold 3 to 7 DVDs, and you had to settle for the painfully slow 5400 RPM drives?

Do you remember the network transfor times and how, if you were lucky enough to be on anything more than a 10 Mbps network, they were essentially CPU (or bus) limited, and how you could not really use the computer while the transfer was in progress?


I think you have simply forgotten both how horrible the overall experience on those machines was compared to today's machines and how expensive and inefficient they were.


I remember those days. A 500MHz Dell PC could run Quake III. There wasn't any video editing. Internet access was just moving from 56K dial-up to A(DSL). The coolest DVD I had was Chronos which came as a freebie with the PC. Had a graphics tablet which was RS232. Hard disk drives were around 512 Gigabytes. Screen resolution was 1280x1024. No 3D monitors or TV. There were only a few dozen processes to handle Internet and other services.

Today, PC's are 64-bit (with the corresponding increase in program size), are multicore, GHz speeds, run processes to handle Internet. Using "cports.exe" I can see that there are direct https to Facebook Gaming services, 1e100.net which seems to be Google, and a dozen other telemetry and streaming services which I have no clue what they are doing (ZoneAlarm, etc..)



posted on Apr, 30 2018 @ 09:13 PM
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originally posted by: LightAssassin
a reply to: Antipathy17

Meh, intel fanboy.

AMD are supporting this current socket for a while yet, whereas Intel change it almost every bloody time. And the performance of AMD is now on par if not sometimes better than Intel.

Do yourself a favor....stop being an Intel fanboy.


LOL, I couldn't agree more.

To the OP if you're looking for performance and feel CPU advancement has stagnated why not get a 16 core Ryzen Threadripper and don't look back.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: nightbringr

Yeah waiting to see what is next. Haven't seen any updates about graphene latelty.




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