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Hoof Trimming.

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posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 07:39 PM
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Now, many people think about 'hoof trimming' as what a Farrier does to a horse to shoe them. However hoof trimming on a cow is a very different endeavor.

To shoe a horse a Farrier has the horse at a stand and pulls her/his foot backwards, and then trims the hoof and fits the shoe, often custom fitting a steel shoe with a forge.

Trimming a cow hoof is far (far) different. ...

The trimmer shows up at 0630am, and he has a chute (a very strange chute). We run the cows (just one today) through the crowding tub and alley and into our squeeze chute. We've fixed panels to the exit of our chute into the trimmer's chute (at the end of ours). The cow goes in, and gets caught in a head-gate. Chains and straps are on the ground, she's already walked over them. The trimmer pulls up the chains and the belly straps under her, and the whole hydraulic assembly picks the whole cow up off the ground.

She's scared. Then we flip her over on her side and chain each of her legs in different spots. Our trimmer, trims 300 dairy cattle a month, but ours aren't dairy cattle. #48 (that's her name) struggles, she struggles the whole time (which amazes this guy how angry she is). She's growling and struggling, but we're trying to help her. Her toe was so badly overgrown her leg was almost bowing. This was important...for her (survival).

#48 has had a bad week, we took her calf from her on Thursday because her teets are hardened to the point where her little bull calf is getting no milk (and what he was getting was diseased). She was what we call "waspy" this morning, meaning she pretty much wanted to kill anything or anyone near her, but we had to get her into the crowding tub, and then into the alley to be trimmed. She charged, she ran, she jumped...and she charged again. The trimmer wasn't helping us, he was just setting up his thing; our job was to get #48 into the tub.

I didn't think she'd go, having been in the chute just two days ago and wrecking (falling down) inside the chute. She knew. They remember. She wasn't going, and she wanted to fight going in. After about 30 minutes of some pretty intense actions, we got her in the tub...and headed down the alley. She went right into the trimming cage and we got the straps under her belly. Up she went, off the ground.

#48 has never been off the ground before and she didn't like it. She struggled for the entire 90 minutes on her side that the trimmer needed to fix her bum toe. It was pretty bad. The best thing I heard this morning at 730am was "I've seen a lot worse!".

Tonight she's walking ably on all fours and not limping. On the table he hit some pretty tender spots on her toes (think: like your toe nails). We found an old abcess which probably caused the toe issue, but he dug it out. It was traumatic.

We put her back down on the ground, and I figured she'd go crazy, but she didn't. She just walked up to the other pasture where we had some of the other cows and went through the gate. Tonight she seems a little tender, but she seems almost incredulous that her toe no longer bothers her.

What a long, long, week!!

Best.




posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I've worked horse's hooves, and I've worked cattle in a shoot; but I've never worked a cow's hooves in a shoot (or otherwise), and I can't imagine any situation that'd make me want to. Working a cow's hoof just sounds scary.

Hope you gave a good pat on the back to whoever it is that dedicated their life to caring for cow's hooves. It's a rough job and somebody's got to do it. Glad it ain't me!



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

Roger that!!

It's a VERY spooky experience!!!! You're dealing with a 1,800lb animal who want's nothing more than to kill anything who's in the way of her being free to run.

When the straps come up under her belly, they freak; it's like they're running in air. When they get on their side they get mad, and they start growling. But they're chained down and can't move. Then the trimming starts.

I give these guys a lot of credit. One time my wife said "We need to trim her toes"[/i], so mater of factly. I said it's a little bit harder than that. Today she saw. There was a pile of nail clippings on the ground....bad "ju-ju" for the other animals...they came up smelling it all. (Note: it was funny...and then they all ran away.)



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

In the old days, they lifted oxen vertically with straps connected to a frame with a windlass in order to shoe the ones that were used as draft animals.
There are still people that shoe oxen, but they lay the animal over on its side like the trimmer did for yours. I saw a rig on line that mounted on the front of a tractor like a front end loader that lays the animal over on its side after it is fastened in vertically.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:14 PM
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You can shoe oxen, and you can shoe horses, but you really can't shoe cattle.

Iv'e seen guys put wood blocks on their feet, but never a shoe.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:20 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

My heart goes out to # 48 😕... can’t be easy having your calf taken away from you, then going through chutes and getting scared. Next shel’ll go through the trauma of a slaughter house.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:25 PM
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And this is in the "Pets" forum.
I've trimmed my cats nails....somehow I doubt it is the same.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: Sheye

There's no trauma there...none at all. It's all very peaceful.

No trauma there...none.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

I'm sorry honestly, but where else should I post it?

They are my love, and I treat them as such. There's a certain understanding about who they are and why they are, but does it upset you I've posted this here?

Honest question.

edit on 4/28/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:33 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Sheye

There's no trauma there...none at all. It's all very peaceful.

No trauma there...none.





That’s good to hear 😊



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: schuyler

I'm sorry honestly, but where else should I post it?

They are my love, and I treat them as such. There's a certain understanding about who they are and why they are, but does it upset you I've posted this here?

Honest question.


Well, until ATS' moderators decide to set up a "Cowboyin'" forum ...



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: incoserv

I doubt that will ever happen.

However, I can just stop posting anything of the sort if that would make people feel better.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:39 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: incoserv

I doubt that will ever happen.

However, I can just stop posting anything of the sort if that would make people feel better.





Your posts are interesting, informative as well as entertaining. Do not quit posting about your real life experiences. Please !



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:39 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: incoserv
I doubt that will ever happen.
However, I can just stop posting anything of the sort if that would make people feel better.


I enjoy these kinds of posts by you.

You ever hear about the old man and the boy who were taking their donkey to market?



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
You can shoe oxen, and you can shoe horses, but you really can't shoe cattle.

Iv'e seen guys put wood blocks on their feet, but never a shoe.

I was addressing means of securing and lifting bovines which can be used for either trimming or shoeing.
Oxen are fitted with shoes when they are used as draft animals. Beef and dairy cattle are not shoed because there is no reason to do it. But you can shoe them.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 08:41 PM
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Dogs and cats are fun, and we have many of both.

They all have a job though, all of them. Everybody has a job. "Pets" are fun, but they're a lot more fun when they have a job.

The cattle have a job too. It's just a little harder.

But....they're one hell of a lot bigger!



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 09:55 PM
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There are different degrees and types of pets.

Cattle aren't pets in the companion animal sense, but no one should want them to be kept and raised by someone who doesn't care for them as individual creatures worthy of a measure of care and dignity. When that doesn't happen is when you get those horrific scare videos PETA so loves to show off.

My aquarium fish aren't "pets" in the companion animal sense either. In fact, an aquarium is classified as decor in some apartment leases rendering the fish as less than living creatures, simple ornaments.But nevertheless, I find the little critters fascinating to watch and take pride in bringing out the full measure of their natural behavior.



posted on Apr, 29 2018 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Theres that gold


Well deserved...

Glad you trim those hooves... I've seen a few cattle farmers that let them grow...

Usually milk cows, but man... Its just disgusting when they get too long

It can't be good for them... Not to mention uncomfortable




posted on Apr, 29 2018 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: Akragon

I didn't even know what these were until you mentioned it in the other thread. I had to look closely to even see what you were referring to.

Thanks for the nice words, and thank you to the staff for, well, everything they do.

Regarding the 'toes', yeah it's pretty uncomfortable to them. So much so they begin to walk differently. Normally they will break off with no action required, but when they have a foot anomaly, like a rock or something jammed up in their hoof, they will start to favor that toe and not walk as heavily on it which causes the 'nail' to grow unabated. This is what happened with #48

We actually now think this may have been the root cause of her to fail this year as a momma. Because she was so slow she probably didn't get the nourishment she needed and became ill which, in turn, caused her udders to have problems once she calved. We'll give her another chance at it next year, she's been a good momma overall. A lot of guys would cull an animal like this at the first sign of problems calving, but she did have a healthy calf. It was just that she couldn't feed it properly, not out of neglect, but her body just wouldn't support it.

Anyway, the adventure continues.

Thanks.

ETA...We knew we were going to have to get her trimmed, but we couldn't really do it while she was still a 'whale', pregnant with her calf. So we had to wait.

edit on 4/29/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2018 @ 06:50 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
The cow goes in, and gets caught in a head-gate. Chains and straps are on the ground, she's already walked over them. The trimmer pulls up the chains and the belly straps under her, and the whole hydraulic assembly picks the whole cow up off the ground.


I know this procedure from my youth but without hydraulics, just the cage and then the head get´s fixed. The gate that is behind them has two moveable metal bars that are lined with leather. You put the hoofe (it´s named "klaue" here, translates to english "claw") you need to rasp on top of those bars and then fix it so the cow can´t kick.

Same for the front but there the metal bar is on a hinge. What´s the reason that the cow is lifted up / layed to the side nowadays?




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