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Something I read and thought my Brother Masons would enjoy.

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posted on May, 2 2018 @ 03:51 AM
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Still collecting notes here and there.
It gets better with time.
Piecing it together one note at time.
Let's build on it....

edit on 2-5-2018 by Pinocchio because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
a reply to: network dude

Ah, but you see God didn't wrap cows in a pig.
Therefore filet mignon is not kosher.


I wrap hamburgers in bacon. I don't think I'd make it in the Jewish Religion. And I feel quite certain, that if God had a do over, he would wrap the cows with bacon naturally. It goes together like peas and carrots Jenny.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: network dude

Well Said, Laddy... Well Said.
God Meant Well When He Named Cow "Ham-Burger."
He Was On To Something. Only Masons We're Wise Enough To See It And Know It....

Cheers To Bacon....



posted on May, 7 2018 @ 01:49 AM
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Weight of a Masonic Ring
By
WB Adam Thayer

Our rings come with an opportunity cost. Of course, it’s easy to give a dollar amount to my ring (it wasn’t very expensive, but in case my wife is reading I’m not going to admit exactly how much), but it has cost me much more than just the money I spent on the afternoon I bought it.

Over the years, my ring has cost me quite a lot in dues payments to different lodges and other bodies. My ring has obviously cost me many evenings away from my family. It has cost me thousands of hours spent studying ritual work when I would have much rather been rotting my brain with television. It’s cost me biting my tongue when some idiot at the grocery store is annoying me, because if I said what I wanted to everybody would know that it was a Freemason who said it. It has forced me to re-examine who I am, and to make changes for who I hope to be one day. Without exaggerating, it literally cost my old identity, who had to die to make room for who I am becoming.

When I first bought this ring, if I had known the cost that came with it, would I have still purchased it? Since the ring is just a symbol, a reminder to me of my obligation, I suppose the question would be better worded thusly: when I first signed my petition, if I had known the cost that came with it, would I still have petitioned? I believe I would have, because the opportunity cost is far outweighed by the benefits that came from it, however I must admit that if the fraternity had been pitched to me in that way I would have definitely paused a bit longer before signing my name.

Even more noteworthy than the cost of my ring is its weight. My Masonic ring weighs 8 grams, according to my kitchen scale, but of course this tidbit of information is only interesting to the most obsessive jewelers among you, and “weight” in this instance is yet another symbol, because the true weight of my ring is unbearably heavy for a man to maintain by himself.

My ring comes with the weight of all of the brothers who came before me; I owe it to them to represent them well to the current generation, and to ensure that the solid foundations that they built are maintained for future generations to enjoy. It is weighed down with an obligation which demands I constantly seek improvement, leaves no room for excuses, and provides for the stiffest of penalties (symbolic though they may be).

I find that often, while I’m writing, I turn to the wisdom of The Beatles, and this instance is no exception; the second side of Abbey Road contains one of my favorite pieces of music, which is nearly sixteen minutes long (even if it’s listed as separate tracks, it’s really one large one), and contains some of the deepest lyrics that they ever wrote. In the middle of this fantastic medley are a few words that come back to haunt me in my darkest hours: boy, you’ve got to carry that weight a long time.



posted on Sep, 30 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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Here is a good one. I haven't been on in a while due to dealing with a bunch of stuff. I saw this and thought my brother masons would enjoy.

A LIVING MASON


His name is John. He has wild hair, wears a T-shirt with holes in it, jeans and no shoes. This was literally his wardrobe for his entire four years of college. He was the top of his class. Kind of esoteric and very, very bright. He became a Mason recently while attending college. After moving to his new town, he finds that down the street from his new apartment is a well-dressed, very conservative Lodge. One day John decides to go there after work. He walks in with shoes, jeans, his work shirt, and long hair. The Lodge has already started and so John starts looking for a seat.

The Lodge is completely packed and he can't find a seat. By now the Brethren are really looking a bit uncomfortable, but no one says anything. John gets closer and closer to the East and, when he realizes there are no seats, he squats down right on the carpet. (Although perfectly acceptable behavior at a college fellowship, trust me, this had never happened in this Lodge before!) By now the Brethren are really uptight, and the tension in the air is thick. About this time, the Secretary realizes that from way at the back of the Lodge, a Past Master is slowly making his way toward John.

Now the Past Master is in his eighties, has silver-gray hair, and a three-piece suit. A good man, very elegant, very dignified, and very courtly. He walks with a cane and, as he starts walking toward this boy, everyone is saying to themselves that you can't blame him for what he's going to do. How can you expect a man of his age and of his background to understand some college kid in the Lodge? It takes a long time for the man to reach the boy.

The Lodge is utterly silent except for the clicking of the man's cane. All eyes are focused on him. You can't even hear anyone breathing. The Secretary can't even continue with the "Minutes" until the Past Master does what he has to do. And now the Lodge watches as this elderly man drops his cane on the floor. With great difficulty, he lowers himself and sits down next to John and welcomes him so he won't be alone.

When the Secretary gains control, he says, "What I'm about to say, you will never remember. What you have just seen, you will never forget."

"Be careful how you live. You may be the only Mason some people will ever meet."



posted on Sep, 30 2018 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

I think you are too jaded to get the point. I think masons will help anyone they think could truly benefit from their help.
But to be a mason requires a little something extra. A little more awareness. A little more belief in something else. You can’t blame them for helping their own before helping the others when the majority of others are only living for themselves ,for today with no concept of God or brotherhood. To be a mason takes an extra step.. an acknowledgement of the truth you hope to find that most will not stop to even think about.
You can’t save everyone and everyone is not worth saving and that isn’t the masons fault.



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: Guiltyguitarist

So you agree, you are in it for yourselves.
That was my point

I am not a mason, I am not jaded, just dont see the altruism the OP was aiming for
Serving others so you get served back, real sacrifice...



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

I’m not a mason either. I know a few though , my dad is one and I’ve talked philosophy with them. It’s not about helping only those that can help back. It’s more like teaching a man to fish instead of giving a man a fish and most people don’t want to be taught. The masons do many things for the community and don’t talk about it.



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 07:53 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
a reply to: Guiltyguitarist

So you agree, you are in it for yourselves.
That was my point

I am not a mason, I am not jaded, just dont see the altruism the OP was aiming for
Serving others so you get served back, real sacrifice...

We are not in it for ourselves, and us helping people has no strings attached. We are quick to help each other first because we are brothers. If you met someone that needed help and a family member needed help of course you'll take care pf family first. Once again we help anyone with no strings attached. Plus it appears that no matter what we do, you'll find something to say about hiiden agendas or that we are somehow in it for ourselves.
edit on 1-10-2018 by Aljoharris because: Needed to add to comment



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: Guiltyguitarist

they should when they are asked



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Aljoharris

I just thought the post was trying to tell people how great Mason's are but it was self service, sort of silly

I don't think for one second that the Mason's are a sincere civil group of people with altruistic motives
I do think it is made up of many men who probably are

I can differentiate the organisation from the members



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

You ever thought about joining?



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: Guiltyguitarist
a reply to: Raggedyman

You ever thought about joining?


No, I have a very busy life that I am very comfortable with
Don't have the time for a men's club, though I can see the attraction



posted on Oct, 2 2018 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

it is self service. human selfishness doesnt allow alturism be anything but pretendence.



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