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Smoked Baby Back Ribs...To Wrap or Not To Wrap, that is the question...

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posted on May, 28 2018 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Loool yes.

I also microwave eggs and even occasionally meatloaf. I’m so going to hell.




posted on May, 28 2018 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
LOL the only way I learned how to cook ribs is to boil and then broil or grill them.

I don’t care if it’s a sin because these sins turn out juicy on the inside and crunchy on the outside and therefore delicious and worth going to hell over. Also they cook pretty fast and it’s fairly easy and simple that way and I’m lazy and probably the devil herself. I’m glad to hear these smoked ribs turned out good though. After hours and hours and hours of all that work I should hope they are amazing. I will have to try it at least once to taste that difference.


I ain't ashamed to admit that ill pressure cook beef ribs (not short ribs, but actual beef ribs, with almost no meat and all gristle) for 45 mins before smoking. Just smoking alone...it gets too dry before the meats tender.

I've also used the pressure cooker as a shortcut when i didn't have time to smoke a half shoulder roast after work once. Smoked it for 2 hours and it came out perfectly fine, after starting it with an hour pressure cooking.

Yes...its blaspheme. But a mans gotta eat.



posted on May, 28 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


Can we talk about how delicious short ribs are though?
No one buys them at my market and I always get them 50% off.



posted on May, 28 2018 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Man, i wish.

They are snatched up quick here. I can spend less and get ribeyes.

Pork ribs...we get those, and all other pork, on sale quite a bit. Beef...mostly the expensive steaks no one can afford...we snatch them up on markdown and pop 'em in the freezer. Filets, ribeyes, etc.



posted on May, 28 2018 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

That does sound delicious, yummmm.

I just use a big ol giant witches pot for the short ribs. Never did me wrong in the past. A witch has to eat as well!



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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Did these yesterday on a Weber kettle, which for my money is the most versatile item you can have for cooking outdoors. And by 'my money' I mean $100 ish. And they're customizable with add-ons and gear to accommodate about anything short of a whole hog.

My go-to site for all things cooked on a grill or smoker is Amazing Ribs. It's worth joining, but the content is free whether you pay to join or not.

Last Meal Ribs

Follow this guy's instructions to the letter at least the first time, then futz around to tweak it if you want.

The site has recipes, techniques, and reviews for about everything related to cooking outdoors. It's all been tested by guys who know what they're doing, and they haven't failed me yet.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

It's interesting you should bring up beef ribs. I've not cooked them in several years, but just the other day was looking at recipes thinking of smoking some to see how'd they'd turn out. I only use my pressure cooker for canning, though.

Granted, it's hard to find meaty beef ribs.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: yeahright


for my money is the most versatile item you can have for cooking outdoors


Why so versatile? Simply because of the add-ons, or is there some else about them that makes them so?

I'll definitely check out that website. Being new to smoking, I'm always learning, and absorbing others' techniques. I did smoke some brats yesterday, which is easy, doesn't take too long, and they turn out great.

This is pretty much from where I took my first-time smoking technique.



posted on May, 29 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
a reply to: Liquesence

Loool yes.

I also microwave eggs and even occasionally meatloaf. I’m so going to hell.


Damn right you are, if you microwave eggs and boil meat. lol
edit on 29-5-2018 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2018 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: Liquesence

Why so versatile? Simply because of the add-ons, or is there some else about them that makes them so?



The add ons can help, but for me, and ~for the money~, the Weber kettle can cook low and slow or fast and hot and do both equally well. Burgers, brats, pork shoulder, baby backs, turkey breast, chuck roast (rather than brisket), seafood, you name it. About the only think limiting you is the size. You're not going to do a whole hog on it but other than that I don't know what it can't do.

The first thing you absolutely must have is a good digital thermometer you can use to monitor the temp over the cooking area for low and slow. Second is an instant read, or second probe, to insert into the meat to check progress. Not extremely helpful for baby backs, but for things like pork shoulder, chicken or turkey, it's close to mandatory if you want optimal results.

Hinged grates are nice, a Slow N Sear is helpful but certainly not mandatory. If you really want t ramp up, a sous vide cooker is nice, provides great results, takes out a lot of guesswork, and shortens the grilling time.

Sous vide some steaks to a perfect medium rare, finish them off on the grill over super hot fire and you may never go to a steak house again. Perfect edge to edge medium rare which you just cannot get using a grill alone. Also excellent for chicken or turkey breast.

Personally, rather than shelling out big bucks for a Kamado which doesn't do everything as well, I'd rather have a Weber, spend some of the difference on a Slow N Sear and a sous vide cooker, and do everything I could want to do as well as or better than anything else I could se.



posted on Jun, 1 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: yeahright

See, I really don't know what makes the Weber different from anything else, including a Kamado (because I am not familiar with either). I guess that's part of it. I have always used charcoal, and the current grill, for several years now, is a charcoal barrel grill, which has a built in thermometer, and which has suited me fine so far (just need to get a side box).

Is the Weber charcoal?

As far as a digital meat thermometer, I usually only use one when cooking chicken thighs, or thick chucks of meat (like prime rib) in the oven, or a rack of lamb in the oven.

Of course, I usually only cook for one or two, so no need to go all out with lots of food.



posted on Jun, 2 2018 @ 05:28 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Weber is a good grill with lots of ad ons. You can go a bit cheaper with char griller.

Kamados are ancient mode of cooking. Basically a clay egg. I use a kamado (acorn)



posted on Jun, 3 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Gotcha. I was actually considering a new Char Griller barrel with side box, which is almost identical to what I have. I have the Char Broil.

Pretty heavy duty steel with cast iron cooking grates. So far it's worked very well and lasted at least 5 years, even though the ash pan and fire grate were very thin metal, eventually rusted through, and had to be replaced.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

I have on old gas/charcoal chargriller that i want to convert to a smoker.

They have replacements for just about everything. I like their products.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 02:27 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence

See, I really don't know what makes the Weber different from anything else, including a Kamado (because I am not familiar with either).



Both are charcoal. A Kamado will set you back something between a house payment and a car payment (Big Green Egg is in the house payment vicinity) and a Weber is about the cost of a nice steak dinner for two.

The advantage of a kamado is once you get it to the temp you want, it retains heat very well for a looooonng time and you don't have to fool with it much. So if you do a lot of long, low & slow it's a good choice when $ isn't a primary consideration.

What they don't do very well is hot and fast sear. The Weber charcoal grill will let you do it all, and do it well without costing you nearly as much. Or give you a hernia trying to move it around.

A grill is a tool, or instrument if you will. It's as good as the person playing it. Some are so junky that they're not worth the effort, but Webers have withstood the test of time. There's nothing anyone can cook on a 22" grill that costs $1000+ that I can't do on a Weber for a tenth of that.



posted on Jun, 4 2018 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: yeahright

Gotcha, cool, that all makes sense now. I guess if the Kamado is clay, that explains the better heat retention, and if heat retention is one of the primary qualities of both it and the egg, I can see the appeal.

I have generally always cooked hot, fast, and direct (burgers, steaks, fish), except for chicken.

So, long, slow, and indirect (smoking) is relatively new to me.

I get it now, thanks.



posted on Jun, 6 2018 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Liquesence

I have on old gas/charcoal chargriller that i want to convert to a smoker.

They have replacements for just about everything. I like their products.


So, what're your ideas? How do you propose to convert it to a smoker?



posted on Jun, 6 2018 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Aluminum foil leaches toxins into the food. Don't use it.



posted on Jun, 7 2018 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Cut a hole in each and weld a piece in to carry the smoke from the charcoal side to the gas side.

Ive seen it and it works well.



posted on Jun, 8 2018 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: Liquesence

Aluminum foil leaches toxins into the food. Don't use it.


Well, the act of smoking/charcoal grilling itself also leaches impurities into the food and in the smoke, so I think a one time use will not be that harmful, comparatively.




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