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Revisiting The Coyne UFO Helicopter Case Of 1973

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posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 02:29 AM
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Some people, including myself, consider this incident as one of best documented military UFO sightings on public record. It occurred near Mansfield, Ohio and was seen not only by the helicopter crew, but also by two Ashland County Sheriff's deputies and ground witnesses, in the vicinity of the sighting.
The Coyne UFO helicopter case, took place in October of 1973, which was apparently a record month for UFO sightings in the United States:


Man says 1973 UFO incident turned life upside down. Calvin Parker, Jr., stands in the area where he and fellow Mississippian Charles Hickson were allegedly abducted by aliens on Oct. 11,1973, on the banks of the Pascagoula River in Pascagoula Miss. The incident made headlines, sparked UFO sightings nationwide and became one of the most widely examined cases on record.

beta.nydailynews.com...


The fall of 1973 brought one of the largest waves of UFO sightings in U.S. history.

www.nashvillescene.com...


31 years ago in October, 1973 there were massive sightings of UFOs from over a large part of the United States. All one has to do is to check any newspaper archives to verify this. Besides the local organization (RUFOS) and two national organizations (Mutual UFO Network) and (Center for UFO Studies), I am a member of a state organization that investigates and researches UFOs. It is the Mutual UFO Network of Ohio. A few years ago a project we did was to collect newspaper articles from around the state of Ohio that were during the UFO wave of October, 1973. I have the 133 pages of Ohio newspaper articles if anyone would want to look them over. Just get in contact with me. The locals will remember this time period (October, 1973), as to where Pat Boone visited the Pumpkin Show. The massive UFO sightings also occurred during the Yom Kippur War in the Middle East when Israel was threatened. There was a possibility of World War III at the time.

roundtownufosociety.com...


But 40 years ago this month, and just days before thousands of kids flooded the streets for Halloween, the truth was way stranger than fiction as a UFO wave swept across the Midwest in October of 1973. Even the Ohio governor at the time, John J. Gilligan, had a close encounter with an “amber-colored vertical craft” for 30 minutes as he was driving with his wife. “I saw one the other night, so help me,” said the shaken Gilligan during a press conference that was cited by Walter Cronkite during the national news. “I'm absolutely serious. I saw this. It was not a plane. It was not a bird. It didn't wear a cape. And I really don't know what it was.”

columbusfreepress.com... -be

The Coyne UFO helicopter case occurred on October 18, 1973 and involved a UH-1H (Super Huey) helicopter of the United States Army Reserve and it's crew of four. In command, was Captain Lawrence Coyne, with 19 years of flying experience. At the controls, was First Lieutenant Arrigo Jezzi, who was a chemical engineer. Behind Coyne and Jezzi sat Sargeant John Healey, a Cleveland police officer and flight medic. Next to Healey sat Sargeant Robert Yanacsek, a computer technician.



The crew were returning from Columbus, Ohio at @11:10 pm, on Oct. 18, when the UFO was first spotted near the Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base, where a squadron of jet fighters are based. A later check confirmed that none of the unit's F-100 Super Saber Jets were in the air at that time.

Healey first spotted a single, non-flashing red light, that seemed brighter than an aircraft port-wing light, flying south, off to the west. Coyne thought it was distant air traffic and told Yanacsek to keep an eye on it. Yanacsek then announced that the light had turned and appeared to be on a collision course with their helicopter, at the same attitude and at an airspeed in excess of 600 knots. The object had accelerated towards them so quickly, there was little time for the crew to respond. Their helicopter was cruising at 2500 feet at 90 knots, when Coyne set the helicopter's controls for a 20 degree dive. At an altitude of 1700 feet, it appeared that a collision between the red light and helicopter was imminent. Much to the surprise of the helicopter crew, the craft suddenly stopped for ten to twelve seconds and hovered above and in front of the helicopter.

The below content is from an article published in the local daily newspaper, The Mansfield News Journal, on November 4, 1973:


"At 1,700 feet I braced myself for the impact with the other craft," he said. "It was coming from our right side. I was scared. There had been so little time to respond. The thing was terrifically fast." There was no crash. "We looked up and saw it stopped right over us," Coyne said. "It had a big, gray metallic-looking hull about 60 feet long. It was shaped like an airfoil or a streamlined fat cigar. There was a red light on the front. The leading edge glowed red a short distance back from the nose. There was a center dome. A green light at the rear reflected on the hull."


Coyne said the green light swiveled like a spotlight and beamed through the canopy of his craft, bathing the cabin in green light.

ufologie.patrickgross.org...

After hovering in front of the helicopter for approximately 10 seconds, the object headed west and made a 45 degree turn toward Lake Erie. The crew noticed a white tail light from the rear of the object. The object made no noise and the crew didn't notice any turbulence during the encounter. Much to the crew's surprise, the helicopter was now at 3500 feet and in a 1000 foot per minute climb.


"I had made no attempt to pull up," he said. "All controls were set for a 20-degree dive. Yet we had climbed from 1,700 to 3,500 feet with no power in a couple of seconds with no g-forces or other noticeable strains."

www.ufocasebook.com...

Sketch of the UFO the crew saw:



Official report (Disposition Form), concerning the near midair collision with UFO, signed by the crew:





posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

There were many witnesses to the Coyne Helicopter UFO Incident, who lived in the Mansfield, Ohio area. This man and his brother recall seeing the object.


My brother, Bill Carver, first noticed the lights in the distant southwestern sky. It was still daylight and the sun was setting. I remember seeing three lights and one of those lights (left of the other objects) may have been a star. My Dad, brother and myself shared the binoculars as we witnessed the middle object perform incredible movements dancing in the sky at incredible laser precision angles and speed. The middle object wasn’t as bright as the other two objects, but the maneuvers were spectacular. We could see red, green and white lights blinking constantly as we were viewing from a kitchen window.



As the object appeared closer to our neighborhood, we went outside to get a better view as the UFO slowly moved northeast towards Mansfield, Ohio. At this time, several of our neighbors came over to our property and witnessed the event.



During this time, I had driven a few blocks from my parent’s house and was driving north on Paul Boulevard. I stopped the car once I noticed how close the UFO was above the tree line over-looking Sunset Park. The chopper was beneath my view. Here in plain view was the UFO, green light on the front, white light and a red light on the rear on a nearly sixty-foot long dark metallic-grey object that had the appearance of a cigar shaped stogie. I sat in my car marveling at its appearance.



Suddenly the UFO shot off towards the northwest and in literally seconds it was the size of a star in the distance. Even faster, the object disappeared from sight. Soon, a small squadron of military jets appeared in the area and then flew away since the UFO had already departed.

therustbeltchronicles.com...

Then there's this eyewitness account, from a woman and her four children, who were driving home at @ 11 p.m., on October 18, 1973.


Apparent ground witnesses to this event have been found by William E. Jones and Warren Nicholson, independent UFO researchers from Columbus, Ohio.



Mrs. E. C. and four adolescents were driving south from Mansfield to their rural home on October 18, 1973, at approximately 11 P.M., when they were attracted to a single steady bright red light. flying south “at medium altitude.” They watched for perhaps half a minute until it disappeared to the south over the trees.



Two of the children (cousins, both age thirteen) jumped from the car and observed both a helicopter and the object, which they described as “like a blimp,” “as big as a school bus,” “sort of pear shaped.” The object at that point subtended an angle equivalent to “a 100-mm cigarette box held at arm’s length.” The object assumed a hovering position over the helicopter, an estimated 500 feet back from the road and 500 feet above the trees. (The ground elevation at the site is almost exactly 1,000 feet above sea level; thus at the noted 1,700-foot altimeter reading, the helicopter was actually about 650 feet above the trees.) The object’s green light then flared up. “It was like rays coming down,” the witnesses said. The helicopter, the trees, the road, the car – everything turned green.”

www.clevelandufo.com...



Here's some information concerning the two Ashland County Sheriff deputies, who witnessed a UFO in Sullivan, Ohio, on the same night...October 18, 1973. (Sullivan is @30 miles northeast of Mansfield.)


According to Hamilton, the Coyne helicopter incident was one of the last things to happen the night of Oct. 18, 1973, which included an atmospheric explosion over Mansfield that was registered by seismographers in St. Louis and a UFO sighting in Sullivan that made the front page of the Ashland Times-Gazette on Oct. 19.



That night, former T-G photographer Chic Knight met two Ashland County Sheriff deputies who described seeing a disc-like object on Township Road 391 about a mile north of County Road 500 while responding to the Sullivan call. The officers stopped and exited their cruiser when they noticed the craft hovering above the trees but said they heard no motor noise coming from it. Then, as they shined a spotlight in its direction, the craft dove toward the deputies before veering off toward Nankin.

www.times-gazette.com...



Before retiring, Captain Coyne was later promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. He also took part, in a special presentation about unidentified flying objects, at the United Nations on Nov. 27, 1978.


]“As far as the vehicle itself, there’s no doubt in our minds what it looked like. A craft that can move at terrific speeds in excess of 1,000 knots, and then stop on a dime, maintains altitude, can change altitude, climb, descend. To encounter a UFO when it approaches your aircraft, you have no idea what it is. I think if it wanted to collide with us, it could have. You can’t get away from it — you don’t have that much time to respond!”



Lending credibility to this case were eyewitnesses on the ground who observed the UFO-helicopter encounter. The Army didn’t prevent Coyne and his crew from speaking out about their experience. In fact, Coyne was allowed to recount the UFO incident to the United Nations in 1978, as seen below, under the sponsorship of Grenada.

www.huffingtonpost.com...


edit on 4/25/2018 by shawmanfromny because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

Fantastic thread, S and F, very well put together.

Very worth the read with details, multiple accounts and witnesses to boot.





edit on 4252018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 05:11 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

Red, green and white is a curious color choice, one that is used for navigation lights.



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 05:40 AM
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Sounds more like an airship like a Zeppelin.
en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...#/media/File:L-Luftschiff1.png



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: shawmanfromny

Red, green and white is a curious color choice, one that is used for navigation lights.


That's because they were just that. Although that white might have been a refueling pod light, instead of the tail navigation light.

Explanation of that incident is already here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

That refers to this blog post with full explanation:
The 1973 Coyne/Mansfield helicopter UFO incident finally explained
edit on 25-4-2018 by Nickless because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 10:58 AM
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Great thread! Glad to see a shout out to Round Town UFO Society. I used to live in Circleville, OH and I would occasionally attend their meetings just out of curiosity. Great deal of info on their site.

Circleville has a pretty cool sighting of it's own from 1947. It was pretty similar to the Roswell crash around the same time in that it was explained to be weather balloon wreckage.

America's First Classic UFO Sighting?



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: Nickless

With a disposition form filled out, that concerns a near midair collision involving an unknown object, I would think authorities would of ruled out known aircraft in the area. It was already mentioned that Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base had none of their aircraft in the air at the time of the sighting. The Commander, that received the crew's disposition report, would've most certainly had radar logs from Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base and other military air bases in the area checked. The sceptic, who wrote the blog post, even admits there's no concrete evidence that a refueling aircraft was even in the area at the time of this incident. To make up for this LACK of evidence, the writer, adds as much information and details, to support his speculations.



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

It seems the incident wasn't really officially investigated:


The day following the incident, Captain Coyne went to P. J. Vollmer, Federal Aviation Authority chief of operations at Hopkins Field, to find how and where to report the occurrence. ... Vollmer could not suggest an official agency to which to report, so the matter rested until Coyne related the event to his cousin, a reporter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Even after the newspaper account, there was no official interest expressed in the matter, so Coyne filled out reports a month later in order that the incident be officially on record.


And Coyne apparently just checked that all F-100 fighters were down in Mansfield:
www.debunker.com...

It wasn't a fighter, it was a tanker, and he probably didn't even ask the right questions, and it may have originated elsewhere, such as from the 160th Air Refueling Group that was located near Columbus.

Also remember how the O'Hare UFO incident was investigated. Several people reported something in restricted airspace, and yet apparently there was no official investigation whatsoever.

I am the author of that blog post and I maintain that even though after 44+ years there might not be records left to prove such plane was there, it explains the entire event in the sort of detail that there's little doubt left it was a tanker. And as far as I know, there's no credible competing explanation.



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: Nickless

I agree, it's a well done credible explanation and I sincerely applaud you for your efforts. My father served in the USAF from 1940-1965 and retired a Lieutenant. I can tell you for a fact, that a report involving a potential midair collision is thoroughly investigated...especially one involving an unidentified craft. The Disposition Form starts this investigative process. The copy of the form may be available for the "public record," but the actual investigative reports may not...they may be classified, especially one involving a potential UFO sighting. Your "detailed" account proves nothing, if there is evidence that no military aircraft was in the air at the time of the incident. You, as well as MANY sceptics, continually belittle eyewitness testimonies from military personnel. There was a seasoned Captain, a chemical engineer, a cop and a computer technician, who stated that the craft "stopped on a dime" right in front of them, before accelerating away. They also stated that the craft made no noise. Your post is a detailed "explanation" and what "little doubt left" may be only in your own mind, not shared by the helicopter crew and other ground witnesses.
edit on 4/25/2018 by shawmanfromny because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: shawmanfromny
I can tell you for a fact, that a report involving a potential midair collision is thoroughly investigated...


So where's the evidence it was investigated? You dismiss a detailed explanation because of the lack of evidence of a military plane being in an area pretty much filled with military bases, at the time of a major military airlift operation, and just assume there was an investigation that would have checked the right things, without any such evidence, and with actual evidence for the lack of official interest.


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
especially one involving an unidentified craft.


Again, like O'Hare? Or the Nimitz incident? Or any of those numerous incidents that seemed to involve an unidentified aircraft and officials didn't care?


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
The Disposition Form starts this investigative process. The copy of the form may be available for the "public record," but the actual investigative reports may not...they may be classified, especially one involving a potential UFO sighting.


Just like the whereabouts of that plane could have been classified?


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
You, as well as MANY sceptics, continually belittle eyewitness testimonies from military personnel.


On the contrary, I actually took all the details of those accounts into consideration and explained why the events looked to them as they reported.


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
There was a seasoned Captain, a chemical engineer, a cop and a computer technician, who stated that the craft "stopped on a dime" right in front of them, before accelerating away.


And as I explained in that blog post, their accounts are proven inaccurate by the witnesses on the ground, who didn't report the same things. Plus nothing "stops on a dime" over something that is constantly flying with a speed of 100 knots. It just temporarily matched that speed, like tankers do.


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
They also stated that the craft made no noise.


Also explained in my blog. Crew in a noisy helicopter didn't hear a plane flying with minimum power over their noisy helicopter, whereas witnesses on the ground reported a lot of noise.


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
Your post is a detailed "explanation" and what "little doubt left" may be only in your own mind, not shared by the helicopter crew and other ground witnesses.


The details are very much shared between all those witnesses, they just interpreted what they saw differently. And I have actually shown some of their interpretations were not accurate, which is proven for example how the witnesses on the ground didn't report the same things as those in the helicopter. And Coyne for example contradicted his own accounts on some occasions.
edit on 25-4-2018 by Nickless because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2018 @ 03:51 PM
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Curious, isn't there a scene in Close Encounters of the Third Kind that goes just like this? I've seen a movie or documentary or something that is just like this.



posted on Apr, 26 2018 @ 09:22 AM
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Let's say that there was actually a prosaic explanation for this incident. Ok!
Good!

But 1973 was one of the hottest UFO waves ever, and not just in the USA,
but globally.

www.nicap.org...

I always want to know the reason for waves.

Now one might think that if there was some big UFO tv show on
the air during 1973, or movies about UFO's that might have some
impact on mistaken identification.

There was one UFO show on from 1970 to 1973:

www.imdb.com...

and movies:

en.wikipedia.org...

But there doesn't seem to be any correlation.

1973 was a super hot year globally, for no apparent reason
in terms of priming from tv shows.

Kev



posted on Apr, 26 2018 @ 10:27 AM
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as far as a reason for waves, my thought would be as I believe we are being observed, ufo's have always been attracted to nuclear events of any kind, whether it be tests, war, or anything in between. Many are seen when or just before seismic events. Many have been seen around active volcanoes. They are a curious bunch.



posted on Apr, 26 2018 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: data5091

I concur with the seismic observation.. that's all but proven... as seismic activity
causes a piezo effect.. which in conjunction with released gas, generally spawns
BOL (balls of light) / "earthlights' which are either related to 'real-ish" UFOs
or are mistaken for them.

the nuclear thing, it appears is disinfo spread by "occult scientists" to get
military funding for their occult research.

Now... earthquakes might explain a wave in the USA, but it couldn't explain
a global wave in 73.. unless there were vast earthquakes globally..
which i don't think was the case.

But looking for realistic explanations === good.. keep looking!

Kev



posted on Apr, 26 2018 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: KellyPrettyBear
I always want to know the reason for waves.
Some of Klass's UFO explanations I wouldn't try to defend, but I do think his comments about waves or "flaps" probably have at least some validity:

Philip Klass, who wrote in his 1986 book UFOs: The Public Deceived

Once news coverage leads the public to believe that UFOs may be in the vicinity, there are numerous natural and man-made objects which, especially when seen at night, can take on unusual characteristics in the minds of hopeful viewers. Their UFO reports in turn add to the mass excitement, which encourages still more observers to watch for UFOs. This situation feeds upon itself until such time as the media lose interest in the subjects, and then the flap quickly runs out of steam.


It doesn't have to be local. The JAL1628 pilot flying over Alaska was reading about UFO cases in the US which apparently got him a little excited about the subject.


originally posted by: shawmanfromny
You, as well as MANY sceptics, continually belittle eyewitness testimonies from military personnel.
It's not belittling so much as recognizing human perceptions have been demonstrated many times to be flawed. If you aren't aware of such cases as the Yukon UFO case which demonstrate this clearly, then you need to do some research. Nobody is calling these witnesses liars, but things are not always what they seem and no human is exempt from misperception, especially if they can't identify what they are looking at. Pilots have the highest misperception rate of any category of witnesses according to the most prolific UFO researcher, J Allen Hynek.



posted on Apr, 26 2018 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

You will notice that I'm big on taking a close look at human psychology
and media priming.

But there are waves in places like Brazil, where at least at the time,
they didn't have electricity or any form of media except word of mouth.

The avalanche of wishful thinking explanation seems somewhat reasonable
for the USA,

but there are other years,with lots of UFO tv/movie/books out there, and
it's dead silent.

There's more to waves than just the psychological theory.

Kev



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur




Pilots have the highest misperception rate of any category of witnesses according to the most prolific UFO researcher, J Allen Hynek.


So one source has it with complete confidence that pilots have the highest incidence of misidentification, huh? The same man who later revisited his previous 'conclusions' and did an about-face? One source: check. A source who later amended his views: check. I'd expect this assertion from O'berg, as every 'fireball' is a misidentified rocket launch...but you're hanging your hat on ONE SOURCE to assert a declarative? Bang-up research, er, regurgitation.

Let's try this: commonsense and simple deductive reasoning would suggest pilots are qualified observers, at the very least; disinformation and obfustication would suggest pilots are the worst (e.g. highest perception/identification rate) observers. Let's try this, too: pilots have the advantage of knowing the difference in what turbulence feels like (in an aero vehicle [for lack of a better term because I don't know the aero lexicon covering all air-bourn vehicles) in comparison to rotor wash; standard navigation lights, etc.; what a sonic boom sounds like and what a pilot would expect in terms of sound, when encountering all number of man-made aero vehicles; the smell of jet fuel and any number of other sensory stimulations that ordinary observers would be, at best, making estimates of with little ability to delineate between vehicles.

But somehow, these highly-trained individuals are terribly unreliable when interpreting/indentifying 'things in the sky'; so much so that ONE SOURCE said that they're the WORST.

I'd ask for some commonsense to be employed, but I'm not sure you actually believe that yourself...so before I continue on: do you believe that ONE SOURCE asserting pilots have the highest misintepretation/indentification is a limb you feel comfortable climbing out on?

I don't visit ATS daily, but I should be able to reply within a few days, if you so choose to clarify that pilot misintepretation assertion (the whole: Hynek said it, how can you argue with a man who later admitted that...well, you should know.)



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
Some of Klass's UFO explanations I wouldn't try to defend, but I do think his comments about waves or "flaps" probably have at least some validity


The Coyne incident with the surrounding events is a pretty good example of various factors behind flaps. First there are factors like the Cold War, Vietnam War and Yom Kippur War, that affect people's hopes and fears. Then there are the concrete global and also local effects of those, such as increased military activity near bases like Wright-Patterson. It's hardly just a coincidence that:


“Ground Zero” of UFO flap 1973 is easily just thirty to forty miles east of Wright-Patt, which is located in southwest Ohio. Eighty to a hundred calls a night about strange lights were being logged from there. The Coyne incident happened 150 miles to the northeast. Thus most of the “flap” occurred relatively in the same direction that an armada of US Air Force aircraft was heading, day-after-day, beginning October 14th, 1973. Could it be that all those witnesses were looking at ships and crafts from this world?

www.ufocasebook.com...

Then there's obviously the media attention that keeps the flap going, such as that high visibility news report by Walter Cronkite, that happened on the day before the Coyne Incident, after which you have plenty of people staring at the skies, predisposed to see alien activity. In the Coyne case, both the helicopter crew and the ground witnesses had just spoken about that news report and UFOs before that incident happened.

I wonder if they would have been able to figure out what happened if they didn't have such remote possibilities on their minds. They had the correct initial thoughts of a plane and navigation lights and members of the crew recognized the possibilities of their own "greenhouse" causing the green color, possible reasons for the climb and so on. They also had each others somewhat differing accounts to compare, and later those of the ground witnesses as well, which should have been enough to recognize some of their interpretations can't be right. Such as their thoughts of the object coming fast from the east, when the ground witnesses clearly stated and saw from a better viewpoint how it came from the south, similarly to the helicopter. It just seems that pretty much everybody had already decided it has to be something mysterious, and chose to believe and remember the more Hollywood-style versions, and disregard accounts to the contrary. Coyne in particular seemed to make such choices between his own self-contradicting accounts, such as believing the object pulled them up "in seconds", while at the same time describing in detail how they were in fact climbing a minute or two after when he eventually looked at the altimeter.

Now that I have presented the case of it being a tanker in a couple of places and seen the response, it has been interesting to see how the same factors seem to be at play. It has been mostly objected because of some details that are contrary to those Hollywood-versions, and after I have pointed out how those have already been shown to be false by other actual eyewitness accounts, even those by the same person, it's just silence. Most just seem to think along the lines that if it has been a mystery for so long, it still has to be that. Many probably just don't want to lose a good story, especially one that was supposedly among the best evidence for aliens. And so the flap lives on.


originally posted by: Arbitrageur
Nobody is calling these witnesses liars, but things are not always what they seem and no human is exempt from misperception, especially if they can't identify what they are looking at. Pilots have the highest misperception rate of any category of witnesses according to the most prolific UFO researcher, J Allen Hynek.


I can think of at least a couple of good reasons why it may be so. First being that pilots may be more confident of their perceptions because they think they are trained observers. Secondly they are equally prone to fall victims of the parallax effect, that is particularly significant for them, as they tend to move faster through the air than the rest of us.

That effect played a significant part in the Coyne Incident and seems to have done so in quite a lot of others as well. I don't know how their training takes that into account, but it's one of those misperceptions that is pretty hard to avoid, trained or not. The TTSA "Go Fast" video is a good example of that, which I have analyzed in more detail here:

Analysis of TTSA 2015 Go Fast UFO video

Simply put, a relatively slow object high up (which it was) looks more or less identical to a fast object flying low (misperception by at least the TTSA, possibly by the pilots and AATIP too). It still does, even if you are a pilot. It requires additional information to recognize what actually is the case, such as the rangefinder info and calculations in that case, but in many cases that just isn't available. Coyne for example just saw a light against a dark background while both that and he himself were moving both horizontally and vertically. Most of us just don't encounter so challenging situations for making such perceptions.



posted on Apr, 28 2018 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: Nickless




That effect played a significant part in the Coyne Incident and seems to have done so in quite a lot of others as well. I don't know how their training takes that into account, but it's one of those misperceptions that is pretty hard to avoid, trained or not. The TTSA "Go Fast" video is a good example of that, which I have analyzed in more detail here: Analysis of TTSA 2015 Go Fast UFO video


So, you've completely debunked the incident and have a blog and an ATS thread to show for it, why wouldn't you put your name to your blog?

I mean, you have concluded with near certainty (if you read 'your' blog -- not buying its your's -- one would come away with a presence of certainty regarding the case...if you're that gullible, or worse, a poor investigator) what happened, but afraid to put your name to it? I'm just a discerning anonymous internet poster, you're conflating yourself with being an expert because you *may have* (again, its the internet and taking anyone word's like your's is a kin to pissing in the wind -- #'s gonna blow back on ya) once flown in a helicopter? And who's to say you didn't appropriate (today's zeitgeist; in my day it's called stealing) someone else's ideas, work, and even graphics/charts? No one...but you...and you don't even have the cajones to put your name to it.

Go bark up some other tree...or admit it's not your work.



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