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Luke F-16 destroyed in emergency landing

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posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: madmac5150

Hell, I have ones that have stuck with me from longer than that ago. They really do get into your brain and stick there though.


I cut my teeth on the F-4G... they were like old school muscle cars; each tail number had it's own personality. The last time I saw those aircraft, they were lined up on the Kolb Rd. fence line at AMARG. A few of those ended up in museums... the rest died as QF-4 target drones.




posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

One of the C-135s that I grew up around is in Tinker, but they took the HF antenna off the tail, so it looks weird as hell. The other one got chopped up. I occasionally see the B-1 that I got to sit in the right seat during an engine run on, when I stop near Dyess, and it's a busy day. I think most of the other birds I dealt with are still flying.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 11:00 PM
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Like it was yesterday for some reason....MO 396 on a FB111-F....twas in 72 oh dang
edit on 24-4-2018 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
Like it was yesterday for some reason....MO 396 on a FB111-F....twas in 72 oh dang


We had an F-4G from George AFB that was co-deployed with us (Spangdahlem AB) in Saudi Arabia back in 1991. 69-260 was her tail number. We had one helluva time getting her AIM-7 missile launchers working properly. (AERO-7s). We finally got it fixed... she got buried in the sand at a very high rate of speed a few days later.

The pilots survived; 69-260 did not.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

I don't remember the full tail number, but the 6594th Test Group had an HH-53, tail number 355. I went into the hangar and saw it during phase, and crawled through it.

A week or so later, it was smoking wreckage on the deck of a ship carrying rocket fuel. No survivors.



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 01:15 AM
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The pilot had 11 hours in the F-16, and was undergoing the Initial Qualification Course at Luke. They were performing a BFM sortie, when the pilot of the Mishap Aircraft began to misinterperate his engine instruments, and wrongly identified an engine failure, resulting in him shutting the engine down. He performed the Airstart Critical Action Procedures checklist, and restarted the engine, but continued to identify an engine problem, despite the engine instruments being in the normal range. The MP attempted to make an emergency landing at Lake Havasu Airport, and landed long and fast, resulting in an overrun, and him ejecting from the aircraft.

The MP intercom was switched to cold mike during the taxi phase of the flight, resulting in the data recorder only recording the actual radio calls, and not any internal sounds. It was supposed to be in hot mic for the flight. At 101746, the MP pushed the throttle to military power while at 17,200 feet, and 200 knots, while 18 degrees nose high. At 101752, the MP pulled the throttle to idle, and thought the engine had shutdown. He performed the restart procedure, and requested to land at the nearest airport. The MIP (Mishap Instructor Pilot) directed the two aircraft to proceed to Lake Havasu Airport.

The MP didn't know where the airport was in either direction or distance. As they approached the airport, the MIP called that the MA was on a "one to one", meaning for every mile forward the aircraft descended 1,000 feet. The MA didn't actually start to descend for another thirty seconds. The MA was high on energy for the entire descent (17 miles from the airport he was still at 28,000 feet). The MA crossed the approach end at 242 knots, 30 knots higher than the recommended speed and touched down approximately 4400 feet down the 8,000 foot runway. The pilot pulled back to attempt to raise the nose higher to increase aerobraking and the aircraft bounced into the air, touching down a second time at 5300 feet. The aircraft left the end of the runway at 93 knots. The aircraft traveled approximately 1,000 feet, before going up an incline, where it became airborne for approximately 300 feet before impacting a fence, tearing the nose, nose landing gear, and right main off. The intake pulled in dirt and rock, causing the engine to FOD out, shutting it down.

media.defense.gov...



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 01:21 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
I'm hearing he may have lost an engine and was trying to get on the ground, and put it down long, and just ran out of room.


Said no F-15 pilot, ever.

*lawn darts teehee
edit on 5-5-2019 by Tempter because: (no reason given)




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