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Multiple fatalities after van runs over people in Toronto

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posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

I'd say it's a Canada thing, the UK is the same, police release very few details until it gets to court.
Unless of course releasing details is helpful to the investigation.




posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
I find it interesting that when something like this happens in the US, whether the authorities sit on information or not, within an hour the news magically has snussed out the perp's name, social media pages, affiliations, etc. Yet here we are, hours later, and literally nothing pointing towards a positive ID of the driver has come out.

I don't know if there's a conspiracy there or not, I reckon it could be perceived as some indication of the American media being tipped off to events from inside sources while the same tends to not happen in Canada, but regardless of the *why,* I find the difference very interesting.


I'm guessing that they have his name and info but maybe are withholding it to capture any accomplices.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

While it's subconsciously frustrating to me as an American who has become used to knowing that information almost instantly after any attack, I have to say I wish the US media would practice the same degree of restraint.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Honestly I think it's cause they have to get out ahead of it. Usually it's only a matter of time before pol has a name. Whether that name is right or not is often questionable, which is generally worse than just providing the information.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

I think we just have much stricter privacy laws. Much of the info that gets released about people in the states - it's just mind boggling, the lack of privacy.....



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: burdman30ott6

I think we just have much stricter privacy laws. Much of the info that gets released about people in the states - it's just mind boggling, the lack of privacy.....


Americans have no privacy whatsoever and, to be unfortunately blunt, anyone who is connected to the internet likely is in the same boat along with us... at least on a practical level. Between turning the Patriot Act inward, the NSA, Google, Apple, Facebook, drones, banks tracking purchases, even the questions asked of you on everything from census forms to employment forms to trying to pay a bill over the phone... privacy has become the greatest lie and illusion mankind has today.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

It can be equally frustrating for us in the UK as well, but I do support it because it prevents jury members being influenced by leaked information.
Remember the old guy who stabbed a burglar recently, every UK member in that thread agreed that he wasn't going to get charged. There was silence from the police while they detained him for the initial 24 hours the cops have before getting a court to extend it. All the while everyone not from the UK was convinced he was being treated badly or whatever, but it turned out he was released with no further action.
As a result though, nobody will ever know exactly what happened that day because it didn't get to court. Court is the only public 'forum' in UK justice, and I assume as a former colony it is similar in Canada.


(post by odzeandennz removed for political trolling and baiting)
XL5

posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:03 PM
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In a video the suspect keeps reaching for a gun even though it seems he already has one pointed at the officer that is confronting him. I think the suspect wanted death by cop.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: XL5

It sure seems like he was trying to get himself shot.
He was faking having a gun.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: bender151

originally posted by: Thecakeisalie
a reply to: Black_Fox

Like sands through the hourglass...

How do we stop this?


Line the sidewalks with barriers or posts


I'm afraid you are right especially in areas with high volume of pedestrians, going to need to be some heavy duty posts, that allow pedestrian freedom of movement but large enough and strong enough to stop a delivery truck. Even then they would just hit softer targets, cant do nothing about crosswalks for example. But yea cities need to at least try.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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double post
edit on 23-4-2018 by putnam6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:20 PM
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An odd statement from the mayor:


www.irishtimes.com...
... the mayor of Toronto John Tory... said there will likely be days of disruption in the city following the event. “It is a time to be as calm as we can be,” he said...


"Days of disruption" -- What is that supposed to mean?



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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They've provided a name... Alek Minassian
heavy.com...

Armenian name, meaning this was likely not an Islamofascist terrorism related incident.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

Where do you stop though?
In my corner of the UK we are effectively rural and have millions of tourists each year, minimal CCTV, hardly any police because the constabulary is funded based on winter population.
You could drive a Land Rover or similar on a packed beach and kill many people, then easily escape to a rural road to switch vehicles and escape.
If cities suddenly become fortresses then the crime will just switch to the easier targets.
To be honest I'm surprised we haven't had an attack in these parts yet, London is like the most policed and protected area in Britain.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

They're called "Bollards" and they're becoming more common in the US in high pedestrian areas with malls or multiuse paths wide enough for motor vehicles to drive on. A concrete embedded steel bollard is designed to stop an 18 wheeler. The reason they're not used even more often is because they pose a major roadside hazard to vehicles that aren't trying to cause chaos, but just happen to be involved in a legitimate car accident. Other roadside barriers flex or deflect to absorb some collision impact, bollards do not.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:30 PM
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Big discrepancy in where the perp was caught:



www.bbc.com...
The driver fled the scene of the incident, at a busy junction in the north of the Canadian city, but was arrested several streets away.



www.theglobeandmail.com...
..by the time they arrived at the intersection of Yonge and Poyntz, they saw the van parked on the sidewalk. A man was laying on the sidewalk directly outside of the van, pinned down by police officers.



So which is it?



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: starviego

Big discrepancy in where the perp was caught:



www.bbc.com...
The driver fled the scene of the incident, at a busy junction in the north of the Canadian city, but was arrested several streets away.



www.theglobeandmail.com...
..by the time they arrived at the intersection of Yonge and Poyntz, they saw the van parked on the sidewalk. A man was laying on the sidewalk directly outside of the van, pinned down by police officers.



So which is it?


The van was several streets away from the people he had run down. The video footage of the arrest shows the van.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: starviego

An odd statement from the mayor:


www.irishtimes.com...
... the mayor of Toronto John Tory... said there will likely be days of disruption in the city following the event. “It is a time to be as calm as we can be,” he said...


"Days of disruption" -- What is that supposed to mean?


Events like this don't happen in Canada very often. He likely is referring to the time that part of the street will be shut down (it's incredibly busy); the grief and disbelief that will be experienced by family and loved ones; the fear that residents will feel; the discussions that will need to be had by council, etc.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: burdman30ott6

I think we just have much stricter privacy laws. Much of the info that gets released about people in the states - it's just mind boggling, the lack of privacy.....


Canadians have faux privacy laws. Just read bill C-36 (formerly bill C-6) and look at what they define as "government." It's all a big front, a game that pretends we're all efing stupid and don't know what is really going on. Canada (CSIS) is watching the states, England and China, England is watching Canada, the US and France, the US is watching Canada, England, Germany, Australia and everybody else, Australia is watching all the Asian countries and India, etc. Our laws do not not prevent espionage on other countries and colonies or trading information with other countries or colonies. Privacy is dead, pretty much everywhere. You have to understand that controversies and issues between intelligence agencies are just put on for "air-time" benefit, to make it look like nobody gets along. The fact is, they are all part of the same club. There may be small differences between factions, but at the end of the day, just like wrestling, they all get paid by the same boss.

Cheers - Dave



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