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Naked Gunman Still at Large: The Latest on the Nashville Waffle House Mass Shooting

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posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

This does not make the situation any less hypocritical, which it is in the extreme.

What do you imagine the statistics would show should alcohol and tobacco-related deaths be factored in?

Why are those products legal?

Could it be cash monies per chance?




posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

im a mentally ill gun owner i have over 50 fire arms and have shot no one or even injured any one legally we are allowed guns despite your fears on the matter ,i have had a background check for all but one of my firearms ive bought (not counting my black powder pistol and rifle collection) and i keep a copy of a letter i had my doctor write me that says i am of sound mind and competent to own fire arms and am not a danger to my self or other just because of all the sigma and in general irrational fear of people like you have for my kind.

the mentally ill are much more likely to be victims of a crime vs the ones perpetrating the crimes

news.ncsu.edu...

cmhadurham.ca...

In today’s media reports about mental illness, there is a tendency to emphasize a supposed link between violence and mental illness. News stories regularly suggest that there is a strong connection between mental illness and crime. But the majority of people who are violent do not suffer from mental illnesses. In fact, people with a mental illness are more likely to be the victims, rather than the perpetrators of violence. Because the media often quotes dramatic statistics to underscore their case, a look at the broader picture is essential. For example, studies have found that the rate of violence (defined as threatening, hitting, fighting or otherwise hurting another person) for people with mental illness is 3 to 5 times the rate of the general public. On its own, this is a worrying figure. But it is similar to how much more violent men are than women. Recent studies have shown that alcohol and substance abuse far outweigh mental illness in contributing to violence. A 1996 Health Canada review of scientific articles found that the strongest predictor of violence and criminal behaviour is not major mental illness, but past history of violence and criminality. Re-shaping beliefs is not an easy task. But it is important to correct the misleading information about this issue, because it leads to intolerance and negatively impacts the lives of people with mental illness and our society as a whole. Learning the facts about violence and mental illness is an important first step in building realistic attitudes about this complex issue.


www.time-to-change.org.uk...

The Facts The majority of violent crimes and homicides are committed by people who do not have mental health problems. People with mental health problems are more dangerous to themselves than they are to others: 90 per cent of people who die through suicide in the UK are experiencing mental distress. In 2009, the total population in England and Wales was just over 43 million. It is estimated that about one in six of the adult population will have a significant mental health problem at any one time (more than 7 million people). Given this number and the 50–70 cases of homicide a year involving people known to have a mental health problem at the time of the murder, clearly the statistics data do not support the sensationalised media coverage about the danger that people with mental health problems present to the community. According to the British Crime Survey, almost half (47 per cent) of the victims of violent crimes believed that their offender was under the influence of alcohol and about 17 per cent believed that the offender was under the influence of drugs. Another survey suggested that about 30 per cent of victims believed that the offender attacked them because they were under the influence of drugs or alcohol. In contrast, only 1 per cent of victims believed that the violent incident happened because the offender had a mental illness. Contrary to popular belief, the incidence of homicide committed by people diagnosed with mental health problems has stayed at a fairly constant level since the 1990s Substance abuse appears to play a role: The prevalence of violence is higher among people who have symptoms of substance abuse (including discharged psychiatric patients and non-patients).


www.nami.org... this link is from NAMI and covers a few topics as well as a good point you start saying oh just because you have an illness means you loose out on a constitutional right ,ya know what alot of people do in those circumstances? they stop treatment and with HIPAA laws you dont even get to find out who is mentally ill unless they decide to tell you ,and again as a protected class legislating against them would have a very many problems under the current anti discrimination laws we currently have



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

I have a rational fear of guns, i certainly hold no ill will against people with mental illness.

I suffer from extreme anxiety and depression myself and also possibly PTSD.

Suppose it depends on your condition but i still maintain firearms in the hands of persons who are mentally ill or drug addicts is a bad idea which can and does result in innocent persons being killed.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: Cygnis

originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

But here's the thing at gun shows, venues, and the like, under federal law, private sellers are not required to perform background checks on buyers.

They also are not required to record the sale or ask for identification, which is rather a large loophole in the system if you ask me and probably responsible for a whole host of people that should normally not be allowed to even fire a gun to procure them without incident or even record.


That's rather interesting. Every gun show/venue I have been to has required ID to even enter the area but not only show ID, but also provide my info for a background check when I was making a purchase of a firearm.

I'm not sure what kind of gun show you are going to, but any legit/reputable gun show will follow rather strict protocol.

Sure, private sales out of the trunk of a person's car are impossible to regulate as it's impossible to keep tabs on everyone and their minute to minute dealings. I'd rather not have a 1984 type monitoring of everything, but that is the direction we are traveling. So in time, I'm sure we'll even be able to just arrest people pre-crime-style and prevent all of these things as people keep screaming for more laws. Just gotta be patient for the loss of all freedoms, folks.

After all, the government and 16 year old kids know best.



naw in Texas i sold two ar 15's by bushmaster and a 12 gauge great big magnum mother right at the front inside area....at the Allen Event Center...with cops by the dozen all around........bushmasters had lasers and combat straps with 5 30 round mags on em.....

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posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

Depends on the illness I guess, paranoid schizophrenia would seem to me to be an example of a condition where gun ownership would be inappropriate in my opinion.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

I am willing to strain my neck to see all
the angles. Even leaders in gov. feeding
off us by selling us the means to destroy
ourselves slowly at the same time.
While driving us all nuts with all the fear
mongering and collusion and wacky
hollywood sex crap to idolizing
Barbara Bush and other worthless
rich blood suckers and on and
on if you catch my drift? I mean what
the hell are we even doing here, wasting
time discussing this topic as if we
might make a difference. What a joke?
I've just accepted that this world is
f%=÷*£ up. Always has been always
will be. And it isn't because of guns or
gun rights or drugs or conspiracy theories.
It's because of us. So guns. It isn"t any
more wacky than everything else.
edit on Rpm42318v55201800000051 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

We certainly don't seem to help matters, ile give you that.

Humanity suffers from a form of collective madness truth be told, but we still need to try and not be to crazy to one another, as down that road lies oblivion for our race really.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

What else could our fate even be anyway?
Okay time to reel it back in.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

"What else could our fate even be anyway?"

i have no idea buddy, apparently, we are special. LoL



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Touche'



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 03:09 PM
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americanmilitarynews.com... m_medium=facebook guess he had also stolen a BMW but its good they captured him

Travis Reinking, 29, had been at large for more than 24 hours after allegedly shooting and killing four people early Sunday morning at a Waffle House in Nashville. It was learned earlier Monday that Reinking was also involved in an unrelated police chase after stealing a BMW last week. Reinking stole a BMW from a dealership in Brentwood, Tennessee, last Tuesday, according to Don Aaron, public affairs manager of the Metro Nashville Police. Aaron was speaking at a press conference on Monday. The suspect went into the dealership last week and asked about buying a BMW, but he refused to provide identification when asked for it, and Reinking then stole a car off the lot. Brentwood Police engaged Reinking in a chase during rush hour, but police didn’t continue with the pursuit due to heavy traffic. The car was later found at the suspect’s apartment building. It wasn’t known who stole the car at the time because Reinking had refused to provide identification, Aaron pointed out.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

i have bipolar (low on the spectrum) and mild anxiety around phones of all things , drug users ie addicts are already prohibited persons but like most things that is not often easy to prove unless they have a series of arrests in their records

mental illness mixed with drug addiction and or addiction to alcohol can exacerbate and make violence more likely but just being mentally ill should not disqualify you from gun ownership

if people keep pushing for a ban for the mentally ill gun ownership with all the stigma that is already out there they will just do what a lot of them already do don't seek treatment , the mentally ill are far from the boogeymen that the media portrays them to be . we have a system in place to regulate those who have lost their firearms rights and that's the prohibited persons list which has been the same for more then a few decades now



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

You raise some interesting points and issues RalagaNarHallas.


"mental illness mixed with drug addiction and or addiction to alcohol can exacerbate and make violence more likely"

These are the type of personalities that should avoid and be prohibited from owning firearms through.

I get where you are coming from, cant tar everyone mentally ill with the same brush, but nor can you allow retarded racist with severe personality disorders to go around killing people that are eating their dinner.

There has to be a happy medium, cant say what that would be all the same, over here we simply dont have guns on our streets in the same manner as the US, never have really even when they were legal or over looked.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

My last entry to this topic. Hold your applause.
I do feel some compassion for these people
gone mad w/e. Truly they are just as dead
as their victims suicide or not. Whatever it
is causing them to carry out these acts of
horror?
I want no part of the judging or finger pointing.
As if what they"ve done makes me better than
them. I think if we move passed all that and
realise that what one human can be driven
to do however or by whatever means. We
are all human and therefore could end up
just as unlucky. And I don't mean this to
excuse their acts. Just empathy for the loss
of their life as well as their victims. Maybe
that"s where as human beings we should
be? All the cursing we see over and over again
and again sure as hell isn't working. Maybe
It's just a lack of love or maybe we have an
opportunity to change ourselves for the
better? Seeing that love just might shatter
the violence. Just a thought.



posted on Apr, 23 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

We are all products of society whether or not we care to realise the fact or otherwise.

That does not justify the actions of these deranged murders though.

It just hints at the reason for them committing the atrocities that they do.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 01:27 AM
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We've had more than our share of mass shootings here in Nashville the last year or so...

Though I'm currently here nothing has been out of the ordinary from my point of view.

That went down on the other side of town from where I'm at. I'm by Vanderbilt. Security around here has been less than usual actually.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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"mentally ill" is a pretty broad term, which is why no legislation should ever use it....EVER.

Instead, legislation targeting those deemed harmful to themselves and others (by a medical expert in that field), and with a clear path and plan with milestones, to restoring those rights if the condition is no longer present, and I'll be fully onboard with such legislation.

Anything short of that, nope, sorry, no vote for you.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
"mentally ill" is a pretty broad term, which is why no legislation should ever use it....EVER.

Instead, legislation targeting those deemed harmful to themselves and others (by a medical expert in that field), and with a clear path and plan with milestones, to restoring those rights if the condition is no longer present, and I'll be fully onboard with such legislation.

Anything short of that, nope, sorry, no vote for you.


But anyone can deem anyone harmful to others, the criteria have become so vague that it could easily be abused.

And then "no longer present", well if you lock someone up, drug and torture them, it would be easy to put them in a situation where they will never be deemed good again.

Legislation will solve nothing - we have more laws than any nation in history yet we never solved our crime problem, it only gets worse.

All these calls for new laws only amount to putting even more people in chains, look at the facts we imprison more people by capita than any nation in history.

The real problem here is that society itself has been corrupted and has become cruel, heartless, and hateful. The only way to solve that is to change our society into something better. No laws are gonna help with that.




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