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Star in a Jar

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posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 08:41 PM
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I saw a cool documentry on cold/hot fusion tonight and there was a some thing called 'star in a jar' it was created using a soundwave and neutrons to create a small air bubble inside a jar of water, something happens inside this bubble that makes an intense flash of light for 1nano second, scientists say that the heat of the flash could be nearly a million degrees.
did anyone see the program? does anyone know how hot the star in the jar is??




posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 08:44 PM
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sounds intresting.... hmmm energy if ity came out oil companys would assassinate the scientist who made it b4 it came out no doubt its all about the big $ sign



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 08:50 PM
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Aparently the US is investing millions into cold/lukewarm/hot fusion every year so there must be something going right, but if they did figure out nuclear fusion they probably wouldnt use it untill they had made maximum profit from fossil fuels imo.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:10 PM
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Do you know the title of the documentary? Or at least what time and station it was on? That could help us who have no idea what you're talking about get some more info on it.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:35 PM
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You are talking about sonoluminescence...

www-phys.llnl.gov...

en.wikipedia.org...

Peace...

Osiris



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 01:18 AM
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sonoluminescence could explain how cold fusion works! in their electrolyte experiment it would all make sense if they somehow produced this standing bubble by accident and this bubble was the culprit for their measurable rise in output energy. if you could coax the bubble to contain a few rogue hydrogen atoms combined with the present deuterium in the heavy water, the atoms would fuse into helium. then, as the available free hydrogen ran out the jars fizzled and died, and were turned off. we only have to figure out HOW this occured. im racking my mind because as i was reading through the second link otlg27 provided it all made sense in a single instant of clarity, and now i cannot for the life of me remember.



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 03:42 AM
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The program was Horizon on BBC2 in the UK, it was shown last night.
The Star in a Jar was created by Sonoluminescence, the theory being that the 1ns pulse created by the collapsing bubble may have enough heat to initiate a Fusion reaction. The program tried to repeat an apparently successful experiment but found no fusion had occurred (which was then shrugged off by the original experimenter who claimed they hadn't followed his paper exactly but also refused to help set them right....hmmmm)

Program info here: www.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 18-2-2005 by special_move]



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 03:51 AM
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There is a species of crab that uses this principle to catch prey. It closes its claw rapidly, and displaces a tiny bubble of air that travels several feet before collapsing under the weight of the ocean and imploding with the force of a tiny nuke. The force wave moving outwards, a very short distance, is enough to stun and kill small fish. The crab has evolved this specially shaped claw over thousands or millions of years, and now has nuclear weapons!


The pressure is a key factor, maybe the scientists should try larger vessels?



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 04:16 AM
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This sounds good. If you can post more information on this subject, I would like to read over it. I know it was not long ago that a couple of scientists were working on something like this but I forget where I read the article.



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 04:27 AM
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Amazing!

Well, maybe they should indeed try their sonolumine experiments in deep water pressured environment to add some extra pressure to the bubblecollapse ?

I also read that ships propellors can suffer from cavitation erosion, maybe if they made tiny propellors using MEMS and nanotechnology, they could get tiny bubbles of the right size.



posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 04:40 AM
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Extra pressure may not be the way forward. The sienctist who claimed to have a positive fusion result actually reduced pressure inside the bubble as he believed water vapour molecules were cushioning the impact of the collapse and hence keeping the temperature lower than optimum. Sounds counter-intuitive to me surely higher pressure->higher temperature?


pao

posted on Feb, 18 2005 @ 09:36 PM
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man i hate all of you UKers, you get all the good shows and im stuck with friends re runs


id like to have watched that show. sounds interesting



posted on Feb, 19 2005 @ 08:04 AM
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Luckly i saw the whole program on my break, my fellow workers kept giving me funny looks because i was watching a show on nuclear fusion, i do actualy think they wanted to switch over to watch friends or simpsons, muhahaha



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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there was a nice little thread about it around here.

can't seem to find it.



posted on Aug, 19 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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Originally posted by Lamagraa
sounds intresting.... hmmm energy if ity came out oil companys would assassinate the scientist who made it b4 it came out no doubt its all about the big $ sign


Wouldn't low cost energy = big $ signs for the energy companies? They could maintain high rates and increase their profit margin....



There are plenty of expensive things that would be cheaper if you made them yourself, but regulations keep you from making them, not assassins....



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