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inconvienent facts

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posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: bulwarkz

It used to be common to see temps in summer in the high 120* and now it almost never gets above 120*
Are you sure about that?
www.usnews.com...




At midday the sun will cast a shadow to the south. That is crazy imo.

No it won't.
You say that to someone that worked on hot slabs of concrete in vegas for a few decades. Vegas is a tourist location. They take that temp in a specific location in the shade. In other words they lie. We simply read the thermometer to know. It has become much more manageable the last 10 years. And the sun was that far north 2,, maybe it was 3 years ago. Not as far north last year but straightup and i mean straightup midday. It is different than before for sure. And the cool weather and hot weather growing seasons are whacked where people are having difficulty with vegetable crops that used to be no trouble.

Come on phage. Is there no place in that great scientific great brain of yours for a binary star system? It is not just our planet seeing strange effects.




posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: bulwarkz




They take that temp in a specific location in the shade.

Yes. Yes they do. There's a reason for that.


In other words they lie.
No. They are trying to get consistent temperature data.


And the sun was that far north 2,, maybe it was 3 years ago. Not as far north last year but straightup and i mean straightup midday.
No. It wasn't. Tell me, has Polaris moved too? Because for the Sun to be "straight up" in Las Vegas, the Earth's tilt would have to change by about 10º. There would be a hell of lot of other stuff going on if that happened. But binary twin couldn't cause that to happen in the space of a few years.

edit on 4/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: bulwarkz




They take that temp in a specific location in the shade.

Yes. Yes they do. There's a reason for that.


In other words they lie.
No. They are trying to get consistent temperature data.


And the sun was that far north 2,, maybe it was 3 years ago. Not as far north last year but straightup and i mean straightup midday.
No. It wasn't. Tell me, has Polaris moved too?

I honestly have no idea what the posted temps were as reported. I do know how we took the temp. 20 years ago temps above 120 was common. 127 was the hottest I remember.

It is milder now for both extremes, summer and winter. It used to be so hot you felt like it was breathing from a blowdryer.
And I have watched polaris move, yes



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: bulwarkz




And I have watched polaris move, yes

Odd.

The front room windows of my house face north. There is a point of land across the bay that is directly north of my house. Polaris has sat directly over that point of land for the 22 years I've been living in my house. I see it just about every night if it isn't cloudy. Are you sure you know where Polaris is?

edit on 4/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 06:04 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: bulwarkz




And I have watched polaris move, yes

Odd.

The front room windows of my house face north. There is a point of land across the bay that is directly north of my house. Polaris has sat directly over that point of land for the 22 years I've been living in my house. I see it just about every night if it isn't cloudy. Are you sure you know where Polaris is?
it is dead north atm. I was wondering about where it was located a few years ago thinking my direction for North was off. It moved. I am outside city lights and do not watch tv. I have a big sky. The inuit elders are talking of a different sky the last few years as well. Not that I am equating me with them. I have just been observant is all. It seems to me alot happened a few years ago that was more visible in the sky. Now it is just overall wierdness with insects and animals and even my own feelings. Things are just different. Even the Schumann Resonance has changed. Significantly so if I am not mistaken



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: bulwarkz




It moved.

No. It didn't.


Now it is just overall wierdness with insects and animals and even my own feelings.
Yes. Climates do seem to be changing. Insects and animals are reacting.


Even the Schumann Resonance has changed. Significantly so if I am not mistaken
Which one? There are several. But unless the distance between the ionosphere and Earth's surface has changed significantly, the Schumann resonances have not. And neither have done so. Just the same old variations. Wiggly lines.
geocenter.info...



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: bulwarkz




It moved.

No. It didn't.


Now it is just overall wierdness with insects and animals and even my own feelings.
Yes. Climates do seem to be changing. Insects and animals are reacting.


Even the Schumann Resonance has changed. Significantly so if I am not mistaken
Which one? There are several. But unless the distance between the ionosphere and Earth's surface has changed significantly, the Schumann resonances have not. And neither have done so. Just the same old variations. Wiggly lines.
geocenter.info...




Certainly the Hertz/amplitude oriented graph show some interesting differences in a few peaks from my review.

The variations of each of the standard graphs reminds me of strip charts I now collect electronically for various compounds. For certain, we do consider peaks to have meaning relative to the compound or item we are evaluating. I can't glean location meta data information from this however making it a bit meaningless and just a 'chart'. Are cloud cover issues why the peaks at midday are less from 4/18 compared to 4/20 on figure 2?



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman

Could be. Amplitude can be affected by various things. Lightning activity is a big one I hear.



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman

Could be. Amplitude can be affected by various things. Lightning activity is a big one I hear.


Touche'

It is also a wavelength near the operation of our own brain waves and Jiggles in the field might affect the 'lunatics'.


edit on 20-4-2018 by Justoneman because: jiggles i meant and giggles I typed, hope it is not a Freudian slip.



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman

Which wavelength? The "resonances" refer to a set of harmonics within a band of frequencies.

But our "brain waves" are oscillations in electrical activity within our brains. They also cover a fairly wide range of frequencies. They are also not electromagnetic in nature. So, probably not.

But who knows? Sure doesn't have much to do with weather. Or climate.

edit on 4/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: bulwarkz




It moved.

No. It didn't.


Now it is just overall wierdness with insects and animals and even my own feelings.
Yes. Climates do seem to be changing. Insects and animals are reacting.


Even the Schumann Resonance has changed. Significantly so if I am not mistaken
Which one? There are several. But unless the distance between the ionosphere and Earth's surface has changed significantly, the Schumann resonances have not. And neither have done so. Just the same old variations. Wiggly lines.
geocenter.info...



it did. Polaris has not always been the North Star. It has happened before.



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: bulwarkz




Polaris has not always been the North Star.

That's true. But it has been the North Star for very many generations and it will be so for very many more. Its movement is far to slow for a single human to observe and is not random.

starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov...
edit on 4/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman

Which wavelength? The "resonances" refer to a set of harmonics within a band of frequencies.

But our "brain waves" are oscillations in electrical activity within our brains. They also cover a fairly wide range of frequencies. They are also not electromagnetic in nature. So, probably not.

But who knows? Sure doesn't have much to do with weather. Or climate.

The exact wavelength of each of us I would guess is going to be a bit different but close to the same. The fact that the wavelength is similar may only mean we align with that frequency and wave length.



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: Justoneman


The exact wavelength of each of us I would guess is going to be a bit different but close to the same. The fact that the wavelength is similar may only mean we align with that frequency and wave length.


The primary of the Schuman resonances is 7.83 Hz, right? Since this is electromagnetic radiation it means that the wavelength is 38,000 kilometers, right? So no, we don't align with it.

Interestingly, that 38,000 km is the circumference of the Earth/ionosphere waveguide. Which is why that is the primary frequency of the resonances. If the Earth were smaller the frequency would be higher.
edit on 4/21/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman


The exact wavelength of each of us I would guess is going to be a bit different but close to the same. The fact that the wavelength is similar may only mean we align with that frequency and wave length.


The primary of the Schuman resonances is 7.83 Hz, right? Since this is electromagnetic radiation it means that the wavelength is 38,000 kilometers, right? So no, we don't align with it.

Interestingly, that 38,000 km is the circumference of the Earth/ionosphere waveguide. Which is why that is the primary frequency of the resonances. If the Earth were smaller the frequency would be higher.



Ok I am Environmental Chemist and not claiming to be an expert Physicist. I am dealing with the Hertz part when I was discussing this, cycles per second. A wave pattern similar to Brain wave patterns I was thinking I meant.



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman



Ok I am Environmental Chemist and not claiming to be an expert Physicist

Ok.
Then I won't ask you how electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength of 38,000 km can affect something the size of a human brain.
edit on 4/21/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 12:18 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Yeah , it is absolutely not normal to have 30 and 40 degree temps in Georgia in mid-April . It should be hanging at least in the upper 70s .
But , but , but...it is warmer in Africa . Or somewhere according to the "numbers".


geez....you don't have a clue about how climate works....you must be a trump voter



posted on Apr, 22 2018 @ 07:26 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman



Ok I am Environmental Chemist and not claiming to be an expert Physicist

Ok.
Then I won't ask you how electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength of 38,000 km can affect something the size of a human brain.



Hz in "cycles per second" are similar to the brain Hz play games with words all you wish. Biology reacts to subtle changes and even you have to admit that. You often poo poo hard data and lavish in fake data that is only deflecting. They have a running side poll going on the top 10 worst for the category of deflecting. You would get some votes but would not be the Grand Idiot of deflection. I wouldn't feel surprised.

HERE are the brain wave ranges smarty pants.
Theta 3-8 Hz
Alpha 8-12 Hz

www.brainworksneurotherapy.com...

Conclusion and to simplify, the earths cycles per second energy is similar to two types of waves our brain uses . Would it be logical to conclude that wiggles in the Earth's energy field possible have affect on biological life? Answer according to Biologist is, yes. How much affect is what research is about and it is being done. Pretend ignorance Phage. Deflect away.



posted on Apr, 22 2018 @ 10:22 AM
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epublications.uef.fi...

quote]originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Justoneman

Which wavelength? The "resonances" refer to a set of harmonics within a band of frequencies.

But our "brain waves" are oscillations in electrical activity within our brains. They also cover a fairly wide range of frequencies. They are also not electromagnetic in nature. So, probably not.

But who knows? Sure doesn't have much to do with weather. Or climate.

Are you that certain you know how the endocannabinoid system works?
if electromagnetics isnt what it is? What is it?

I think it is all about electromagnetic influences on the ECS and quite frankly what we do not know about the ECS is the most important fact at play here.
The entire system is about EM and frequency and resonance.

The question becomes, "why is so little known about the ECS?

when it comes to health and wellness this topic is completely absent, why?

It is because of ECS that "grounding and sungazing" is so beneficial.
Sungazing is one of the most pleasant experiences in my life. I feel so energized and refreshed from it.



posted on Apr, 22 2018 @ 10:30 AM
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Resonance?
The ECS? HONESTLY, Science has just gotten started on this system.
Because of cannabis this system is not taught and secret for the most part. Most people have no clue we even have an ECS. That probably includes you phage.a reply to: Phage



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