It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Parents may face charges, hogtie 'predator' who wanted sex with 13-year-old daughter

page: 7
21
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 04:02 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

As I said...


The 'sting' in the OP would have been carried out massively different if it had been in my social circles.





posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 05:33 PM
link   
a reply to: ArMaP

I would agree they went about it wrong from a legalities standpoint.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 07:21 PM
link   
a reply to: vonclod

A legalities standpoint is the only point when we are talking about law. If they thought about going to the police they should have kept on the right side of the law and not make their own, "reality TV" included.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 08:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy

originally posted by: Teikiatsu
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Sure but if the parents were acting oblivious to the situation, they'd need the cops to search his phone for texts to confirm his intent.

In the UK the 'daughters' phone record is good enough for prosecution. The paedo hunters here do it regularly, post a fake profile on social media and wait for the paedos to flood in requesting sex. They screenshot the messages, agree to meet up after being asked then detain them as regular citizens can.


I'm amazed that people do this. If I ever became a vigilantee I know who I would go after, sounds like it would be pretty easy to find targets. Hunt the hunters.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 08:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy

originally posted by: Teikiatsu
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Sure but if the parents were acting oblivious to the situation, they'd need the cops to search his phone for texts to confirm his intent.

In the UK the 'daughters' phone record is good enough for prosecution. The paedo hunters here do it regularly, post a fake profile on social media and wait for the paedos to flood in requesting sex. They screenshot the messages, agree to meet up after being asked then detain them as regular citizens can.


I'm amazed that people do this. If I ever became a vigilantee I know who I would go after, sounds like it would be pretty easy to find targets. Hunt the hunters.


The people who hunt kids?



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 10:11 PM
link   
This is like calling up a drug dealer, having come to your home deliver the drugs, jump him, film the attack, then claim you were the victim.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 10:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: DanDanDat
The people who hunt kids?


The people who hunt pedo's. It is absolutely disgusting. Every single one of them should be in jail.

Hunting down, luring, and beating up (or worse) anyone because you think you've tricked them into committing a crime is not healthy behavior, and should not be tolerated in society.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 10:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

Details like:



Desperate for a solution, she said she posed as her daughter and messaged the man to invite him to her home.

...

She said she confronted the man as he made his way to her daughter's room, punching him before the girl's stepfather and another man restrained him.


So she did not invite the man as the mother, then she confronted him as he went to her daughter's room. Not as he came to the door, as he went to the room. Nowhere does it say they just opened the door and let him into the house, or they would have confronted him at the door or outside.

Yes, pointing out your lack of detail is seriously fun.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 10:52 PM
link   
As a parent with two daughters, I can appreciate their state of mind and agree with it. But Canada aside, I don't think their argument would fly anywhere.

Once they had knowledge that the guy was coming, and what for, then all of their actions become premeditated. And that's where they're going to sink.

You can't know someone is coming to your home, not resist their entrance, and then assault them based on trespass and claim self defense

This reminds me of a case that I believe happened in a state I used to live in (or maybe where I live now) - guys get into an argument online. One guy tells the other guy to come over so he can get shot. "Just walk on in, I'll be waiting". Guy took him up on his offer. Got shot. Self defense was not a viable defense, and the shooter was convicted. Because he knew beforehand.

Also as a parent, though, I find it pretty abhorrent that they used their 13 year old as predator bait. I like to think I would have gone to him instead.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 11:15 PM
link   
That would have just happened to be the week I decided to waterproof my foundation. I wouldn't have an ounce of guilt



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 01:45 AM
link   
a reply to: SlapMonkey

Read about this a couple of days ago. They ought to get a medal!! As for the police, they now have all the evidence they need that this dude is a scumbag. Yet they are complaining? If they had planned the exact same sting, all would be well, but because they couldn't bother, the parents face charges?

Canada has some serious issues.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 01:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 01:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


You do know.. that undercover police/ agents also do that right? Some pretend to be prostitutes online and organize a meeting with the solicitor and when the guy shows up he is arrested on the spot.

If the police aren't doing their jobs then people have the right to take matters into their own hands.


originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


Exactly

edit on th2018000000Wednesdayth000000Wed, 18 Apr 2018 01:59:21 -0500fAmerica/ChicagoWed, 18 Apr 2018 01:59:21 -0500 by SoulSurfer because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 02:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: SoulSurfer

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


You do know.. that undercover police/ agents also do that right? Some pretend to be prostitutes online and organize a meeting with the solicitor and when the guy shows up he is arrested on the spot.

If the police aren't doing their jobs then people have the right to take matters into their own hands.


originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


Exactly


Yes, because if the cops can do it legally, then so can a citizen. He didn't come over for milk and cookies; he came to assault a child.

I guess Canadian parents can learn from this, though. No calls needed, no video.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 02:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


People should not take the law into there own hands. One they lack the training and these parents put there daughter into danger. What would happen if he brought a friend and they both were armed? The parents playing vigilante put themselves and yes there daughter in danger. He could have shot both them and killed her. But worse case now they made it easy for the pedophile to get his case thrown out. Now when he gets his case dropped then rapes a child it's on them.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 02:22 AM
link   

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: SoulSurfer

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


You do know.. that undercover police/ agents also do that right? Some pretend to be prostitutes online and organize a meeting with the solicitor and when the guy shows up he is arrested on the spot.

If the police aren't doing their jobs then people have the right to take matters into their own hands.


originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


Exactly


Yes, because if the cops can do it legally, then so can a citizen. He didn't come over for milk and cookies; he came to assault a child.

I guess Canadian parents can learn from this, though. No calls needed, no video.


I'm sure his lawyer will have a good excuse and thanks to them he won't go to jail. Police have to set up a case and are very careful not to entrap them and have rules that they have to follow. All they did was get any case the police had destroyed.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 02:40 AM
link   

originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


People should not take the law into there own hands. One they lack the training and these parents put there daughter into danger. What would happen if he brought a friend and they both were armed? The parents playing vigilante put themselves and yes there daughter in danger. He could have shot both them and killed her. But worse case now they made it easy for the pedophile to get his case thrown out. Now when he gets his case dropped then rapes a child it's on them.


This guy could as easily have lured the girl elsewhere, and her fate would have been sealed. I have zero issues with hunting, trapping, and dealing with a predator, especially one that threatens a child. The police refused to help, knowing the guy was on his way. What if they'd intercepted the message, and a meet arranged by the child? As it is, they at least has some measure of control, and the creep likely assumed the girl would be alone. That said, they should have been armed, but it's Canada.

No, if and when he rapes a child that is on HIM, and on the police who released him. No blame lies on parents who did all they could to protect their child.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 02:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes

originally posted by: SoulSurfer

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: dug88

That's strange, since their website says you have be at least 19 at the time you start with them and have a high school diploma or equivalent.

@ - OP: gotta agree with Infolurker. Yea, a guy has a right to defend his family in his own home....but that right gets a little fuzzy when you invite somebody over with the intent of putting hands on them.


You do know.. that undercover police/ agents also do that right? Some pretend to be prostitutes online and organize a meeting with the solicitor and when the guy shows up he is arrested on the spot.

If the police aren't doing their jobs then people have the right to take matters into their own hands.


originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes


If the police had set up the sting, and lured him to their house, and had to wrestle him into submission, would anyone say they were in the wrong? Whatever happened to a citizen arrest?


Exactly


Yes, because if the cops can do it legally, then so can a citizen. He didn't come over for milk and cookies; he came to assault a child.

I guess Canadian parents can learn from this, though. No calls needed, no video.


I'm sure his lawyer will have a good excuse and thanks to them he won't go to jail. Police have to set up a case and are very careful not to entrap them and have rules that they have to follow. All they did was get any case the police had destroyed.


People who are not cops set up such meets all the time, and so do police, and it's all legal. Canada seems to have a real problem with self defense. I recall another case, some years back, where a fellow shot at people who were throwing molotov cocktails at his house, and HE was arrested, and they were not.

Totally backward system they have up there.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 03:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: Teikiatsu
So she did not invite the man as the mother, then she confronted him as he went to her daughter's room. Not as he came to the door, as he went to the room. Nowhere does it say they just opened the door and let him into the house, or they would have confronted him at the door or outside.

That's what I said, there's some crucial information missing. Did they leave the door open? Did someone opened the door to let him in? Did someone told him where the girl's room was? Without knowing the answers to these questions we cannot know how things really happened, we can only create our own versions of the events, and reaching conclusions not based on facts is the best way of being wrong.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 03:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: dragonridr
The parents playing vigilante put themselves and yes there daughter in danger. He could have shot both them and killed her.

They may have done many things wrong, but they did one thing right: the girl wasn't at home during the event.




top topics



 
21
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join