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Pilot Error caused loss of two A-10Cs near Nellis

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posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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The two A-10Cs that crashed near Nellis collided due to pilot error. One of the pilots was an instructor for the Weapons School, while the other was upgrading to an instructor. The pilot that was upgrading failed to notice that he was climbing, and he eventually climbed up to the same altitude as the instructor, where the two aircraft collided. The aircraft were on a night Close Air Support mission for the weapons school, when they went into orbits over the target area. The student was to orbit below 10,000 feet while the instructor would block 11-12,000 feet. While performing orbits, the student became task saturated and failed to perform instrument sweeps, relying on audible warnings that he was climbing above his assigned altitude.

Between 7:28 and 7:43pm, the student climbed to 11,400 feet, where the instructor was orbiting. While preparing for his attack run, the two aircraft collided and became uncontrollable and both pilots ejected, before the aircraft impacted the ground.

www.airforcetimes.com...




posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ouch...

So question. When this sort of thing happens. What do they do with the person that caused the accident?

Do they bench him for a while?



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: grey580

Depends. In this case, he'll probably get some remedial training, and it goes onto his record, but he's probably flying again before long, as long as he's been cleared by the flight surgeon. Sometimes they get reassigned as Maintenance Officers, or to a non-flying position, but that's usually if they did something really stupid, and no one would be willing to fly with them again.
edit on 4/13/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 02:48 PM
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First, I'm glad both pilots are safe.

Second, losing A-10's (in particular) is a sad thing.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 03:56 PM
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Considering they aren't going to be replaced...it brings a tear to my eye. Hope he gets hazed by his mates for a long while over this...should be criminal to lose one of those birds to negligence...



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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Hope both are safe. Zaphod, have you ever heard that someones callsign/nick was changed because of some mistake? I know they don´t choose the nicks themselfes, the team does. But have you ever heard of something like that?

IDK, something like someone kills a lot of tires and get´s renamed to "TireKill" or so. I don´t know if it´s possible to constantly make mistakes like destroying a tire and not crash the thing, it just serves as an example.



a reply to: RickyD

I won´t call this negligence when the report says oversaturated. Can´t imagine the blame he put´s on himself now if I were him, not because of the damn plane (yes, they are beautiful) but because of the trainers life he put to risk. Hazing from his comrades is the last thing you need in a situation like that. There´s a time for that in the distant future, sure...

If he did nonesense and caused an accident, well, other story of course.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:10 PM
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Ejections are nasty.Think they do some damage to backs etc.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: Blackfinger
Ejections are nasty.Think they do some damage to backs etc.


Ejections are a "life saving" measure. No one said it was not going to injure the crewmember who had to use it.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

Callsigns are complicated. You might get one during training, and another once you're at your unit, but a lot of the time once you're in your unit, and are given that callsign, you're stuck with it. I suggest watching the show Carrier that was on PBS. I think it was episode 2, they talked about the various nicknames the pilots on the ship had. Everything from the guy that could get everything you ever wanted or needed, to the guy that dumped fuel on the deck getting ready to take off. It was pretty funny.

Speaking of callsigns, I'd love to know how the new 9th RW Commander got his. It's "Spoo".
edit on 4/13/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

One of the crew members that ejected from the B-2 that crashed on Guam was transported to Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii and was in the hospital for something like two months, as a result of his ejection related injuries.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:22 PM
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First I had heard of this and it's sad. Ejection usually does cause some sort of permanent back problems due to the G forces involved. I have my own related to flying in Nam and I never had to eject and am glad of it. Pilot task saturation is a major problem and needs more work. Flag for the thread. My best,



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I doubt he'll ever forget to check his instruments again.




posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: airforce47

They want to work with SNC and develop a tablet system for the A-10 that would include checklists and tasks. Because they're not already busy enough in that cockpit.



posted on Apr, 14 2018 @ 04:49 AM
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a reply to: airforce47

I can imagine that it´s not a funny ride must be like all hell breaks loose in that intense moment.

Once had a hard opening of the chute getting off the plane around 4.7km alt. After the fast and hard opening, the cheststrap was at my chin, cracked parts of the outer plate between T3+T4 and broke the left knob on the bone (sorry, don´t know the english terms, can provide MRT, it looks scary. Blacked out for a moment (not long I guess), could barely breath. And if that wasn´t enough to worry, in mid air, I discovered that the chute had ripped on a lenght of about 1.5m following the stitchings in a 90° angle. That made it a bit hard to steer...

Let´s say it was a very painfull, half-controlled landing on a duststrip with gravel on it between a row of trees.

Can´t imagine how it feels to be catapulted upwards by a rocket!



posted on Apr, 14 2018 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




Speaking of callsigns, I'd love to know how the new 9th RW Commander got his. It's "Spoo".


Maybe he likes to eat worms. Quick google search indicates a possible relationship to the series "Babylon 5".



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