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'Is curing patients a sustainable business model?'

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posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 04:12 AM
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Yep, thats the title. And you will never guess (/s) who asked it..

Goldman Sachs asks in biotech research report: 'Is curing patients a sustainable business model?'

They are asking the really important questions:


"Is curing patients a sustainable business model?" analysts ask in an April 10 report entitled "The Genome Revolution."

"The potential to deliver 'one shot cures' is one of the most attractive aspects of gene therapy, genetically-engineered cell therapy and gene editing. However, such treatments offer a very different outlook with regard to recurring revenue versus chronic therapies, (...)


Money (!!) quote:

"While this proposition carries tremendous value for patients and society, it could represent a challenge for genome medicine developers looking for sustained cash flow."


Where does the money come from for example?

The company's U.S. sales for these hepatitis C treatments peaked at $12.5 billion in 2015, but have been falling ever since. Goldman estimates the U.S. sales for these treatments will be less than $4 billion this year, according to a table in the report.


THIS is big pharma, people! Not something like vaccines / homeopathica (although those are suspicious, too! Making a lot of money and rising!).
These people fear for their profits as soon as you can cure or better: remove a disease from your genome for ever. Because there is no "SUSTAINED CASH FLOW".




posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 04:14 AM
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nope theyd lose tons of money if they actually cured patients .



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 05:35 AM
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For hospitals yes



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 09:41 AM
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originally posted by: VengefulGhost
nope theyd lose tons of money if they actually cured patients .


I have had the misfortune of dealing with the medical community for the last twenty six years. I have found that they only want to treat not cure anything. The money making only comes with stringing you along. Surgery that I needed 3 years ago is no longer recommended...? Months of expensive testing results in nothing but bills.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 12:10 PM
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This explains a LOT. My and some others' medical experiences now make So. MUCH SENSE.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 12:24 PM
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Well if they actually had a concience or soul i bet these questions from them would be more palatable.



posted on Apr, 13 2018 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: buddah6

originally posted by: VengefulGhost
nope theyd lose tons of money if they actually cured patients .


I have had the misfortune of dealing with the medical community for the last twenty six years.


I guess I just made it in under the wire. My cancer was cured 31 years ago.

edit on 4/13/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 03:25 AM
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Cockroaches. Mind you, it would surprise me if big pharma has not already put this into practice.
edit on 21-4-2018 by p75213 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 03:30 AM
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Just curious how much have you paid back into the system in those 31 years?

Is it possible the numbers allow for individuals To be saved based on their performance?



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 04:19 AM
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originally posted by: VengefulGhost
nope theyd lose tons of money if they actually cured patients .


Unfortunately you are right. Everything is about money. If there were one shot cures for everything, you would have huge losses of jobs, money & research.
I don't doubt for a second that there are such things as one shot cures for certain ailments, but not all.

These types of cures won't see the light of day, unless you are very high up in the chain.



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 04:28 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

No curing patients is not a sustainable business model, like any other business it relies on repeat business for it to be successful. The sheer amount of research and development required to find a cure should be enough for anyone out there to do the math and come to that conclusion .



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 10:28 AM
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I wonder if these company's are really as short sited as these post ?
Cures are worth billions and for every cure you find there are 1000s more needed .
It is the one business model that can not fail to make money .

if these company's only care abut the money they make today then hey will go out of business .

On the other hand maybe they are this short sited .
A car could be designed and built to never need fuel in its lifetime never need new tires never need a oil change .
Now this may look like a good way to go out of business to people who are short sited but to me it looks like a way to sell a billion cars and even with such a car people will always buy news ones and once old enough ( say 20 years they will be scraped like any other car .

Fact is quilty is the best business model of all when selling high cost items like cars frigs medical stuff you get more repeat business then you can handle .



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 02:05 PM
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The bedrock of Big Pharma's business depends on people being ill and feeling lousy. Do you really think they are in business to make us well?

Unless they come up with something that requires re-dosing at a stiff price, there will be no cures in our life time. You can take it to the bank, that if there is a cure, it will never see the light of day, if it is in Big Pharma's hands. If it is a natural or in the hands of the average person, it will become a felony to possess, and said person will cease to exist. Just like in the movies.

Cost of the Common Cold: $40 Billion



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed




Just curious how much have you paid back into the system in those 31 years?

Not a whole lot, actually. Semi-annual visits to my oncologist for five years. Then annual. Until he retired five years ago. Note to self: I have to do something about that.
edit on 4/21/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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