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Dozens of dead geese plunge from the sky into an Idaho parking lot

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posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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Interesting. I wonder if they are spraying weedkiller there around this time? If the geese had landed in a freshly sprayed field, it could cause some problems that might kick in after leaving. The neuroexciting effect of the roundup coupled to the lightning storm might cause this. Roundup blocks acetylcholinesterase and could increase acetylcholine levels too high in the birds then the fear could cause them to die. A pesticide would do the same thing, but they probably wouldn't be spraying pesticides in April.




posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: starviego
Could the flock have flown through a high-energy microwave beam? Microwave communication has to be transmitted line-of-sight from tower to tower.

I knew a guy that worked on high power radar sets that the US used to spy on Soviet missile tests from neighboring countries during the Cold War.
He said that if a flock of birds happened to fly through the beam when they had it fired up, they would die in midair and fall out of the sky.



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Seems odd that lightning would cause something like this. An airborne goose doesn't have an earth ground to complete a circuit, the lightning shouldn't have any effect on them. I could understand it if they were on the ground as I've seen this with cattle when lightning hits a nearby tree, but not geese in the air.


The answer you seek is in this. If it can happen to a plane, why not an animal?

Scientific American
edit on 11-4-2018 by wtfatta because: Dropped phone and hit reply when I picked it up



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 01:42 PM
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A friend of ours used to say when 5G comes on ,birds will drop dead from the sky,i don't suppose its in operation yet though?



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: wtfatta

Yes, I am aware of that. That was actually part of my point initially. Aircraft get struck by lightning all the time and don't fall out of the sky.



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Planes are designed to account for being in between two polarized points.

A goose is not.



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Maybe it was a Airbus



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 05:17 PM
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id be having me fiddy servings of foie gras



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: wtfatta

Yes, I am aware of that. That was actually part of my point initially. Aircraft get struck by lightning all the time and don't fall out of the sky.





Aircraft are engineered with stuff that minimise damage caused by lightning.



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 10:05 PM
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Lightning strikes depend on a number of factors like distance, ionisation paths, dielectric properties of the medium (air), overall potential difference and can be cloud to ground or cloud to cloud. Could the flock have been flying between 2 oppositely charged clouds where their flying formation presented (slightly) reduced resistance corridor for the discharge?



posted on Apr, 11 2018 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: openyourmind1262
Canadian Geese always fly in formation....the flying V.


Stop spreading false information, Canadian Geese never fly. They just amble about, real slow and methodical while crapping everywhere.


While that is true , one must admit that they are very polite and courteous also.

edit on 11-4-2018 by bluemooone2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2018 @ 06:02 AM
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originally posted by: bluemooone2
While that is true , one must admit that they are very polite and courteous also.


We know what that's all aboot.



posted on Apr, 12 2018 @ 06:31 AM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

Good post, and yes indeed this was likely the cause. Just seems odd we don't see more of it, what with all the migratory birds and the total number of thunderstorms during migration season. It would be interesting to understand the certain circumstances which causes events like this (i.e. the specific conditions, beyond just the general theory).

I just thought it was an interesting story to post on ATS.



posted on Apr, 12 2018 @ 11:41 AM
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cloud to cloud lightning could very well take out a flock wile at the same time being rare .
Do you realize some lightning goes UP from clouds also ball and static ground to cloud is the most common is all .



posted on Apr, 16 2018 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: midnightstar

Cloud to cloud lightning strikes are not at all uncommon but a flock of birds being in the 'sweet spot' at the exact right worst time I'd class as being a very rare event. Birds are usually very sensitive to such situations and would tend to steer away to safer areas.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 11:52 PM
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They better a eaten them.




posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 12:00 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
Stop spreading false information, Canadian Geese never fly. They just amble about, real slow and methodical while crapping everywhere.


I dont know what the term is for it, but on the little lake I know theyd do this thing where they flap their wings like crazy although not precisely "flying", and skim across the surface just above the water where their feet smack the surface as they go, and they paddle their feet as if they're actually running across it. I recall them doing it for like quarter mile bursts or so. And they honk loudly the whole the like look at me I'm Bob Dobbs running across the water!



posted on Apr, 20 2018 @ 12:32 PM
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Seems odd that lightning would cause something like this. An airborne goose doesn't have an earth ground to complete a circuit, the lightning shouldn't have any effect on them.


This actually isn't the first time this has happened, though rare.

It isn't the lightning that kills them, it's the fall and impact. The lightning or air pressure around them likely only knocked them out. (which, when flying, is going to be bad).


They better a eaten them.


I read about a 1935 case of the same thing (or around that time), I think it was in a foreign nation, where they absolutely did just that! (I'm kind of like Cliff on Cheers, in this way, for some odd reason)....
edit on 20-4-2018 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 07:48 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
I dont know what the term is for it, but on the little lake I know theyd do this thing where they flap their wings like crazy although not precisely "flying", and skim across the surface just above the water where their feet smack the surface as they go, and they paddle their feet as if they're actually running across it. I recall them doing it for like quarter mile bursts or so. And they honk loudly the whole the like look at me I'm Bob Dobbs running across the water!


That's all about mass, lift, drag, velocity.
They're relatively heavy birds for the wingspan they have so they need to gather enough velocity to take off from a restrictive medium like water. They get up enough speed to be out of the water with their feet just slapping the surface before 'lifting off' and the technique is not exclusive to geese, I think swans do the same.



posted on May, 2 2018 @ 08:41 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: openyourmind1262

Yep...because...

...Aliens!






Probably a Podesta.

Chevron flight, flapping and racing on, before the snow..

They got the urge for going and they got the wings to go.

Had to be a weather anomaly.

Sudden pressure drop?



Wish i had a geese.

lol.

Glad there were no casualties on the ground, tho.








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