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Motion Sickness Sucks

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posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 07:44 AM
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I was using public transport today and like 99% of the other people on board, I decided to browse the net on my phone. Reading news seemed to be ok, but when I chose to have a game of checkers, about 3 mins in I felt extremely warm, mild dizziness and bad nausea - and I was sweating. I put my phone on key lock and put it back in my pocket and I struggled to regain my composure. Only when I exited the transport vehicle did I feel a bit of relief.

Motion sickness can be really debilitating. Does anybody else suffer from this condition from time-to-time like I do? If so, do you have any suggestions to help manage the symptoms?


edit on 5-4-2018 by Incandescent because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent

Ever try mitigating with ginger? Get a strong ginger Candy, or maybe ginger rea in a thermos? Wonderful for some folk.

peppermint has a similar effect, however both are diaphoretic, so you may feel your pores open on your gnoggin
edit on 5-4-2018 by BlueJacket because: eta



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 07:56 AM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: Incandescent

Ever try mitigating with ginger? Get a strong ginger Candy, or maybe ginger rea in a thermos? Wonderful for some folk.

peppermint has a similar effect, however both are diaphoretic, so you may feel your pores open on your gnoggin


Hadn't heard of that, thanks for the suggestion.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent

I've never had motion sickness but I understand how you must feel. I've been to 27 countries on mission and never once experienced MS but I sympathize with anyone who has, including my buddies en route.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent

I hear you-I get wobbly knees in an elevator, it's not a great feeling. Sometimes it feels like someone is sitting on your chest even when you are just sitting in a car that goes around a corner too fast. And don't get me started on heights, the mixture of vertigo and a terrible fear of heights...If you ever saw me at the space needle you'd find me in the fetal position.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 08:40 AM
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I don't think my sons father has had to sit in the backseat of a vehicle etc... in 10 years so we didn't know he had motion sickness issues until I rented a boat for 8 hours while on Vacation last week. As soon as we got into the Gulf of Mexico he was chumming up the waters for fishing. Felt so bad for him, he couldn't even enjoy it.

Second day we went out he took some Dramamine at the suggestion of the dock hands- that really helped him immensely. He still didn't feel perfect but he didn't lose his lunch the second day.

Maybe that would help with your transportation troubles. No one likes to be sick, especially not on public transport!

Best wishes!

-Alee



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 08:45 AM
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My wife has a hard time sitting in the back seat of a car. She cant read or be on her phone in the back but has no issue in the front seat.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:13 AM
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originally posted by: Incandescent
I was using public transport today and like 99% of the other people on board, I decided to browse the net on my phone. Reading news seemed to be ok, but when I chose to have a game of checkers, about 3 mins in I felt extremely warm, mild dizziness and bad nausea - and I was sweating. I put my phone on key lock and put it back in my pocket and I struggled to regain my composure. Only when I exited the transport vehicle did I feel a bit of relief.

Motion sickness can be really debilitating. Does anybody else suffer from this condition from time-to-time like I do? If so, do you have any suggestions to help manage the symptoms?



Yep, this is me - happened this morning on the bus. Took a quick look at my phone and spent the rest of the journey a bit green around the gills to say the least, very happy when I could get off the bus.

I also don't do roller-coasters at all or boats very easily - managed the hydrofoil to Capri in the Bay of Naples until it hit a spot where the current flows around the island and it started bouncing around, felt a bit ill at that point.

I suffer a lot with sinus problems so that doesn't help either.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent
racing the boat i,am fine in bad chop but sitting on the startline gets me qeasey, on the buses it seems to be where your seated, type of bus and whos driving can make a difference .
i also find wearing earbuds with low volume helps to mellow things out a bit, maybe their damping out higher energy vibrations from the engine on the eardrum.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:28 AM
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I worked as a deck hand on a charter boat for a couple of months.
I had to quit after puking myself inside out a few times from sea sickness.
Not pleasant.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:28 AM
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I worked as a deck hand on a charter boat for a couple of months.
I had to quit after puking myself inside out a few times from sea sickness.
Not pleasant.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:41 AM
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Definitely use ginger. After thirty years of using Dramamine I finally found that using ginger is much better and doesn’t make me sleepy.

Canada has a medication made with added ginger that we can not get in the states that is definitely the best. I think it is called Gravol, if you can get that it is a wonder drug.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: Incandescent
I was using public transport today and like 99% of the other people on board, I decided to browse the net on my phone. Reading news seemed to be ok, but when I chose to have a game of checkers, about 3 mins in I felt extremely warm, mild dizziness and bad nausea - and I was sweating. I put my phone on key lock and put it back in my pocket and I struggled to regain my composure. Only when I exited the transport vehicle did I feel a bit of relief.

Motion sickness can be really debilitating. Does anybody else suffer from this condition from time-to-time like I do? If so, do you have any suggestions to help manage the symptoms?



*raises hand*

There is no reading or looking at my phone while in motion. I can't even play first person shooters at all, or eve figgin' mine craft on a screen larger than my phone. I will get sick. Boats? Hahahahaha... No.

I also wonder if it doesn't contribute to my intolerance for opiates. I get very dizzy whenever I've had them, and then I get sick.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent

Sea sickness sometimes. Usually on smaller boats. When I was a kid I got car sick often.
I didn't throw up just horrible nausea and misery.
I don't get airsick but I know people do. My sister did when we were kids. Her first flight on a prop to florida was spent mostly in the restroom or with a bag in her hands. She was fine going home. We were on a jet for that part.
IF I'm forced to sit backward on a train it can make me uncomfortable but not usually nauseous though I will change seats as soon as I'm able to.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I worked as a deck hand on a charter boat for a couple of months.
I had to quit after puking myself inside out a few times from sea sickness.
Not pleasant.


This.. Sea sickness is worse than car sickness. You just can't make the horizon behave the way you need it to. And closing your eyes only makes it worse... like bed spins when you've had too much to drink.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie

Aw I really feel sorry for you. I'm not afraid of heights at all. There's this ride that shoots you straight up in the air over a hump and face down back to the ground at a very high speed. Then you level out and get slingshot back to the terminal. What a rush. I love roller coasters even at 60. I live near Busch gardens in Virginia so I can get my adrenaline rush.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:28 AM
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I also wonder if it doesn't contribute to my intolerance for opiates. I get very dizzy whenever I've had them, and then I get sick.


Oddly enough so do I, always wondered if it was connected.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:28 AM
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a reply to: Incandescent

I can't read anything in a moving car for more than a minute or so without getting motion sickness (phone, book, whatever) unless there's like zero jostling.

That really doesn't impact me too much. What's impacted me far more is simulator sickness. If you're unfamiliar, it's basically getting motion sickness from simulated 3D environments like those in simulators or a lot of video games. It was first described and named after pilots and instructors began reporting sickness in a helicopter simulator in the 50's. From what I remember a majority of those using the simulator experienced symptoms so it seems that most people are susceptible to some degree.

What really gets me is first person shooters, going all the way back to Wolfenstein. Any of the Call of Duty games will have me wanting to puke my guts out within about a minute. Strangely some games either never triggered it or only did for a very short period when I first encountered them and then I was able to play without discomfort. Like the N64 cult classic, Golden Eye and any of the Halo series. I dunno, something with the physics of the engines used I'd guess.

It gets much worse and affects even more people with virtual reality which is probably the biggest thing holding VR back.

Also, I can't watch found footage movies at all which is no big loss because it's a stupid gimmick for lazy filmmakers.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

I don't get airsick (not so far, anyway. Nor, oddly, does flying trigger my fear of heights) but I can't sit backwards on a bus or a train as that makes me ill.



posted on Apr, 5 2018 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

I'd never heard of that. I know from reading up on simulator sickness that gradual exposure over time can train the brain and decrease or eliminate symptoms.

Interestingly, the prevailing theory seems to be that the disconnect between what the eyes are seeing and what the inner ears are registering triggers what might be an evolved response to poisoning.



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