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Is there a 3-dimensional pattern to Pi?

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posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: Deluxe
I thought DB is trying to build a mini-collider in his basement... maybe a time machine or a hovercraft that runs on Bud Lite?




posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: Deluxe
a reply to: TycoonBarnaby

I think he is asking if it's possible to create a geometric representation based on pi in two or more dimensions similar to the way the Fibonacci sequence gives rise to the Golden Ratio and then the Golden Spiral.








Yes.

That.

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

I did not say that adding those would give you a value of pi. Where did you get that idea from in my post?



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

This is electronics.

Kirchoff's Law states that all voltages measured across components must be equal to the voltage source. Vx = (Rx/Rt)*Vs

What goes in must go out.

Same goes for current. Ix=(Rt/Rx)*It

Same for power. P=It^2*Rt (P=I^2*Rt)

P=Power in watts
I=Current
R=Resistance

s=source as in Voltage Source(Vs) t=total x=value of an individual component or measured area of a circuit part.

Where pi comes in on this I don't know.

If you're asking about how Pi applies in all directions, you just do those equations backward.
edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

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posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: Deluxe
a reply to: projectvxn

I did not say that adding those would give you a value of pi. Where did you get that idea from in my post?

Your syntax


But I misread your post.

My apologies.


edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy


Well, speaking of synesthasia, how about instead of a 3 dimensional visual pattern, a 4 dimensional auditory pattern played on a Pi-ano?




Here's fibonacci, and coincidentally, there are exactly 888 comments on the video and the youtube link text has the word "ear"in it lol.



edit on 3312018 by CreationBro because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy
Visualizing the Infinite Beauty Of Pi And Other Numbers

Cristian Ilies Vasile

The Beautiful Flow of Pi



edit on 09 11 2015 by MaxTamesSiva because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Careful asking this question friend... This way madness, and Marko Rodin, lies...

I'm for the most part joking here, but in a kinda serious way, because when you asked this question my immediate thought was that this could be quite plausible!

Then I got excited, really excited!.

Until I remembered that I'm nowhere near qualified in mathematics to do anything other than hundredth monkey poo flinging at the wall / numerology / pattern recognition.

I still think it's a really good question though, and I hope someone who does understand high level math can help you get to the bottom of it!

Thanks a bunch for bringing it up though, it's a fun thing to ponder for sure.



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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What if we twisted Pi


This is actually a very interesting artifact of math.

There are "magic" angles at which certain characteristics are observed

For a twist you can do this (pi^2/pi)(L^2/r^2)


Where L is the length of what you're twisting and r is radius squared


EDIT:

If you CUBE the lenth you get a 3D twist rate using Pi. (pi^2/pi)(L^3/r^2)

edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 05:44 PM
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What about converting odd numbers in PI to zero and even ones to odd and seeing if it could be binary? I actually tried to do this before with mixed results, but it could be that there is data hidden in PI.



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: JackKcaj


Or every third prime change it. . . something like that.

Or take a L- twist at the odd and a R-twist at an even. . . .


a reply to: projectvxn

Those images are what I was imagining!



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy




Those images are what I was imagining!


I had to take some time to imagine what would happen if you twisted a circle and then a sphere, and that is what I came up with.

To get different twist directions all you have to do is change the values from positive numbers to negative numbers and it goes the other way.
edit on 31 3 18 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:06 PM
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originally posted by: JackKcaj
What about converting odd numbers in PI to zero and even ones to odd and seeing if it could be binary? I actually tried to do this before with mixed results, but it could be that there is data hidden in PI.


There is not.

In math all numbers are arbitrary until they are used to describe something.



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:12 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn

originally posted by: JackKcaj
What about converting odd numbers in PI to zero and even ones to odd and seeing if it could be binary? I actually tried to do this before with mixed results, but it could be that there is data hidden in PI.


There is not.

In math all numbers are arbitrary until they are used to describe something.


That's why I was curious what would happen if you changed it from a 10-base to something else.

ie; Hexidecimal. . .



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: projectvxn

originally posted by: JackKcaj
What about converting odd numbers in PI to zero and even ones to odd and seeing if it could be binary? I actually tried to do this before with mixed results, but it could be that there is data hidden in PI.


There is not.

In math all numbers are arbitrary until they are used to describe something.


That's why I was curious what would happen if you changed it from a 10-base to something else.

ie; Hexidecimal. . .


When I demonstrated the change from base 10 to base 60 it went from 3.14 to 3.125.

I then demonstrated that both base 60 and base 10 pi. calculations will yield the same results even with rates of change and time variables added.

Pi is really no mystery at all and it can be reliably used as a constant for all of the functions demonstrated this far and then some.



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Here's a really cool article where artists tried assigned colors, directions, etc to the digits of pi.

www.washingtonpost.com...



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

So in a base-60 universe, Pi is 3.125.


This is what is interesting and driving me a bit loopy.




posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

It looks different in other bases but is still the same value of pi.

turner.faculty.swau.edu...



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:47 PM
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originally posted by: Deluxe
a reply to: DBCowboy

Here's a really cool article where artists tried assigned colors, directions, etc to the digits of pi.

www.washingtonpost.com...




AAAIIIIIGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!

YES!



posted on Mar, 31 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: TycoonBarnaby
Pi is an irrational number. Irrational numbers by definition have an infinite decimal expansion that does not repeat (no pattern.)

Also, a number has no dimension so your question is basically nonsense to a mathematician.


Think outside the box. Have you ever seen "Contact"?




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