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SCI/TECH: Mysterious Lobster Shell Disease Spreading

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posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 05:06 AM
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A mysterious bacteria feeding on the shells of Lobsters, causing their shells to pop off killing them. Rapid progression of the disease in the past few years has sent costs rocketing some 50% recently. Experts believe the source of the problem range from Industrial chemicals, warmer ocean waters, to a Larvacide used to kill Mosquitoes that carry West Nile virus.

 



news.yahoo.com
NARRAGANSETT, R.I. - A disease that rots lobsters' shells and can kill the crustaceans now affects 30 percent of lobsters along the New England coast, decimating the industry in many areas, scientists said Wednesday.

The disease's cause and how it spreads remain a mystery, though theories are emerging and the scientists said they will seek state and federal money for further studies.

The disease does not taint the lobsters' meat, but makes the shells too unsightly to serve whole. It can weaken lobsters so much that some die prematurely.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




But panelists agreed that shell disease and possibly other factors, including intensive lobster fishing and predation, have decimated the industry in southern New England and Long Island Sound.

More lobsters are contracting shell disease, and the problem has spread from southern New England waters all the way to Maine, scientists said Wednesday at a symposium analyzing a phenomenon that has mysteriously afflicted the industry in recent years.

Bob Glenn, a fishery biologist with the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, said samples taken in 1999 showed lobsters with shell disease were confined mostly to Buzzards Bay. Over the next four years, afflicted lobsters were found for the first time in Cape Cod Bay, Boston Harbor, Outer Cape Cod and as far north as Cape Ann in Maine.

"There's been a general northward migration of the disease," Glenn said.



Related News Links:
pei.cbc.ca
www.scienceblog.com
www.cbsnews.com


[edit on 17-2-2005 by Banshee]




posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 06:05 AM
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This sounds like a "huge" problem to me. If the lobsters fail many people will be out of work. Even more important would be one of natures wonderful creations gone. Thank you for bringing it to my attention.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 06:20 AM
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I am afraid it may be too late for the industry. This has been going on for several years, and jobs have already been lost. I only heard about this story a few times the past several years, and if you don't live New England, Great Lakes, and other fishing areas, chances are you will not hear about this until its too late.

I'm going to miss the tasty little Lobsters. But now i would be worried about a species jump to Alaskan King Crab, Shrimp, etc. Who knows how far it many go.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 06:53 AM
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Another scientist, Roxanna Smolowitz of the marine biological laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., said bacteria attach themselves to the lobster's shell and begin to penetrate inward.


I find it hard to believe that the bacteria would not 'taint' the meat. The shell is subject to absorption of any bacteria or other contaminant. Just like our own skin.

Mercury Levels in Commercial Fish and Shellfish



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 08:17 AM
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hmm. Wonder if all that pollution has finally created something?



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by Bourgeoisie
A mysterious bacteria feeding on the shells of Lobsters, causing their shells to pop off....

The chefs around the world just crossed their fingers and breathed a sigh of relief - lol - Ever have to trim your way through hundreds of lobster shells?

This is quite incredible though


now affects 30 percent of lobsters along the New England coast

Wow...I wonder if this will continue to spread throughout the rest of the oceans....I know there's a completely different and rare species of lobster in the Caribbean that are friggin enormous compared to the ones we know and love....although I think only certain sizes are edible…

But if this did continue to spread and worsen, is it possible there could be some cure for this that could be distributed in the oceans that would not have an adverse affect to other creatures?

As a side dish....I was unaware of this until not to long ago, but did you know that lobsters can live to be over 100?! And if you order Jumbo lobster (8 lb+) in a restaurant, that they're anywhere between 20-50 years old?!



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:13 AM
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Thank you for posting this.


Most species in this world have strange new diseases - only one of the reasons many scientists say we are in the middle of a 6th mass extinction.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:20 AM
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Yes nature it can not do anything against us the ones that are killing them, and what some does not want to understand is that they same way all these pollution is affecting our environment is also harming every one of us.

But is OK, like the president said, he can not harm the economy and agree with harder laws against polluters because he has to protect jobs, well very soon when our skin starts to rot like the lobster shell its not going to be any people to fill those jobs.

The only ones to be losing here is nature and us the people. Corporations and big polluters are making a "Killing" alright.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:22 AM
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Originally posted by EnronOutrunHomerun
Wow...I wonder if this will continue to spread throughout the rest of the oceans....I know there's a completely different and rare species of lobster in the Caribbean that are friggin enormous compared to the ones we know and love....although I think only certain sizes are edible…


Caribbean lobsters are known as the clawless spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, of more southerly waters, is a distant relation of the American lobster.

Where did you hear that some sizes were not edible, that surprises me since I have eaten several large ones? The tails alone were 3 pounds and I found nohting wrong with them. Not as good as Cold Water Australian tails but still edible.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:24 AM
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good post.


This type of news scares me... a new bacterial disease among one population, will usually indicate that more are at hand... these type of "manmade plagues" will NOT just have one result, but many... (fresh water frogs show similiar decimations)

I have often wondered how long we can dump raw sewage (very infectious), nuclear waste, herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, all manner of other poisons... and the simple matter of common wastes that can accumulate to toxic levels, into our worlds bloodstream without making it or it's inhabitants sick...

well, the lobsters and frogs.. they are a changin...

shellless lobsters, and 5 legged frogs.. a gourmands dream, and humanitys nightmare...

anyone ever heard the term "canary in the mineshaft"... well ours just died...

[edit on 17-2-2005 by LazarusTheLong]



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 09:38 AM
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Antibiotic Resistant "Superbug" on the Rise
1. A particular variety of common bacterium is becoming ever more resistant to antibiotics, causing potentially serious problems for people who are already at increased risk for infection. Staphylococcus aureus, often referred to simply as "staph" bacteria, are commonly carried on the skin or in the noses of healthy people.

We have to worry about our own problems with diseases too.



Symptoms
"The symptoms experienced by MRSA-infected patients vary somewhat depending on the part of the body that's been infected," says Dr. Almoujahed. "Surgical wound infection results in pain, redness and swelling of the surgical site and occasionally the wound may drain pus. MRSA pneumonia causes cough, shortness of breath and chest pain. Fever, chills, and sweats can be present in infection of all sites."


Yes we are having problems too. People around does not even realizes they danger of this problems.

healthlink.mcw.edu...

Diseases that used to be rare now are more common.
Lupus Deaths on the Rise in US



Features and Symptoms of Lupus
The causes of lupus are unknown, but scientists believe there are both genetic and environmental factors involved. There isn’t a specific gene known to cause lupus, but the illness sometimes strikes more often in families where one member has already been diagnosed with the disease. Environmentally, exposure to ultraviolet light, certain drugs, high stress levels and infection can all trigger lupus attacks.




healthlink.mcw.edu...

This all connected to the same issues about prions that Soficrow has brought over and over to educate our members here of what is going on.

People we are consumers how much more of infected food we eat everyday and not aware of because in can damage the food industry, just think about it.

I guess the pray before you eat it's not only for grace but to pray for safety and to be lucky not to get poison in the process, even if does not kill us is affecting us a littler bit at a time.





[edit on 17-2-2005 by marg6043]



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:08 AM
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NO!!!!!! Not my favorite food!!!
I love...love lobster, but I'm certainly going to think twice the next time about ordering one the next time I visit my favorite seafood restuarant. I too find it hard to believe that the disease doesn't affect the flesh in anyway, I wouldn't trust it.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by shots
Where did you hear that some sizes were not edible, that surprises me since I have eaten several large ones? The tails alone were 3 pounds and I found nothing wrong with them. Not as good as Cold Water Australian tails but still edible.

I was watching food network one day when they were doing some exotic and rare ingredient show (about the only thing worth watching on that channel anymore)...and they brought out these friggin behemoth lobsters...and I want to say that's what they were called, but a search on google came up with little info to support it...

If I remember right, they said some cost over $200 and that the larger they got, the more unpalatable the meat became....


[edit on 2/17/2005 by EnronOutrunHomerun]



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:41 AM
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Originally posted by EnronOutrunHomerun
If I remember right, they said some cost over $200 and that the larger they got, the more unpalatable the meat became....
[edit on 2/17/2005 by EnronOutrunHomerun]


Do you recall which show it was. I could then look up the show notes and see what they said.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:48 AM
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I am going to find out how is the fish industry going back home in my beautiful Island seafood is our livelihood, and If something bad is going on my family will know.

Funny I grew up with seafood but here in the states I do not eat it that often, to me is not the same.

I guess I am picky.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by shots
Do you recall which show it was. I could then look up the show notes and see what they said.

I wanna say Bobby Flay or Ming Tsai...One of their shows - It would be about a year or two old....



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by EnronOutrunHomerun

Originally posted by shots
Do you recall which show it was. I could then look up the show notes and see what they said.

I wanna say Bobby Flay or Ming Tsai...One of their shows - It would be about a year or two old....


Thanks that will narrow the search down by tons since they have 19 pages of lobster related receipes



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by worldwatcher
NO!!!!!! Not my favorite food!!!

Favorite food? How can you like paying $30 bucks to wrestle with a dead animal for its meat? Its kinda rundant. Maybe its cause I have had bad expierence with eatin lobster. It flies when I try to wrestle it, and scatters itself to the nearest customer.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 01:58 PM
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The best way to help control the spread of this disease, besides understanding it better, is to stop fishing for lobsters. If you leave them alone for a few centuries, natural selection will favor those whose shells are intact.

Or, fish only for damaged lobsters. They may not make good presentation, but at least the president can keep eating lobster salad, and the canneries won't have to go out of business.

The fisheries would benefit, as would the canneries, by new fishing rules and an increased rarity in their commodity. If the product was much more expensive, or nearly unavailable, they wouldn't have to fish so much to make the same money. The problem would be more inclined to correct itself under these circumstances.



posted on Feb, 17 2005 @ 02:24 PM
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Would anyone be surprised if I casually mentioned that research suggests diseases like this result from the combined effects of Mad Cow-like prions and chemical contamination?







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