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Trump Administration Retreats on Tip-Sharing Plan in Compromise

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posted on Mar, 25 2018 @ 10:17 PM
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originally posted by: Southern Guardian
a reply to: rickymouse


So, trump is looking out for the waitresses and waiters interests. Kind of nice of him to make sure these people aren't screwed by the restaurant owners. I leave a tip for the waitress, not for the owner of the restaurant. I personally banned a restaurant because the tips go to the owner of the restaurant, he automatically has the tip added to the bill on the credit card.


Ricky are you aware of the administration's stance?


President Donald Trump's Department of Labor wants to give restaurant owners greater control over pooled tips.

The Labor Department announced in December that it would work to undo an Obama-era regulation that stopped employers from collecting and redistributing workers' tips however they wanted if the workers earned the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

www.newsweek.com...

The department claims it's to allow back-of-house staff to get a share of tips generated by the waiters and other service employees. The problem with this explanation is that there's no gaurantee. The proposed change would give employers power to collect these tips and that's it. From there the employers would dictate.

In my neck of the woods, waitresses (servers) make 2.50 per hour, tops...However the servers make pretty good money in tips...They generally don't get to work enough hours to make a decent living at it...I almost always tip with cash...




posted on Mar, 25 2018 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: rickymouse

A tip is a reward.

Uncle Sam taxing your gift has bastardized it into wages.


They have been taxing tips since I was working in a restaurant back in the early seventies. Not all the tips the waitresses got were reported though, but they were required to report at least enough to show they made minimum wages.

I dated some waitresses and observed them all counting their tips at the end of the night, they made more than I did working in the flooring mill or being one of the bosses of an agency. A good waitress makes good money.




They started that tax in the 60's I think.

A place I worked in, the waits were pulling down $200+ a night.

I was making like $9.50hr. Late 70's.

It was an awesome place, food was top and it was a model I based my first place on here in HK.

I never begrudged the waits making that kind of money compared to us in the back.

We got a % of tips from the floor each nite and every week it would be divied up.

The more they made, the more we got. An extra $25-50+ cash was ok.

I tip well and know who screws up, tip is not affected if it's the kitchens fault but is when it's the waits fault our dinner is not pleasant. 10% min tho.

I don't go to high end places anymore. Not much I can't do at home for at least half the price anyway and I can blame the dogs if something goes wrong.

My first wife was the best waitress I ever worked with. go figure. She could handle a dining room and bar by herself and not mess up an order.

Not a small place either.

Anyway, I'm out of the biz, YAY! It's been a 40+ yr trip and I feel for people in the food service industry. Buffets or white table cloths. Private clubs or chains.

Just don't overcook the haricots.





posted on Mar, 25 2018 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: burgerbuddy

originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: rickymouse

A tip is a reward.

Uncle Sam taxing your gift has bastardized it into wages.


They have been taxing tips since I was working in a restaurant back in the early seventies. Not all the tips the waitresses got were reported though, but they were required to report at least enough to show they made minimum wages.

I dated some waitresses and observed them all counting their tips at the end of the night, they made more than I did working in the flooring mill or being one of the bosses of an agency. A good waitress makes good money.




They started that tax in the 60's I think.

A place I worked in, the waits were pulling down $200+ a night.

I was making like $9.50hr. Late 70's.

It was an awesome place, food was top and it was a model I based my first place on here in HK.

I never begrudged the waits making that kind of money compared to us in the back.

We got a % of tips from the floor each nite and every week it would be divied up.

The more they made, the more we got. An extra $25-50+ cash was ok.

I tip well and know who screws up, tip is not affected if it's the kitchens fault but is when it's the waits fault our dinner is not pleasant. 10% min tho.

I don't go to high end places anymore. Not much I can't do at home for at least half the price anyway and I can blame the dogs if something goes wrong.

My first wife was the best waitress I ever worked with. go figure. She could handle a dining room and bar by herself and not mess up an order.

Not a small place either.

Anyway, I'm out of the biz, YAY! It's been a 40+ yr trip and I feel for people in the food service industry. Buffets or white table cloths. Private clubs or chains.

Just don't overcook the haricots.




I actually enjoyed working in the restaurants I worked in when I was young, that was back in the early seventies. I worked at a supper club in the kitchen in seventy one and at a big boy restaurant in seventy three and seventy four. I did dishes in the Big Boy, but covered for the cooks when they went on breaks. It was pretty fun, we went partying with the waitresses after closing at twelve thirty at night. The cops were at the parties sometimes, they liked to party too, but only partied with people they trusted. I think the waitresses were the reason they came there, but it could also be that my relatives worked for the city and in the police department. They were good guys when you get to know them, no different than anyone else.



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