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Volunteer police to patrol schools

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posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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I was reading in another thread how some poorer US counties are struggling to fund extra police for their schools but didn't wish to go off topic hence this thread.

Here in the UK we have unpaid volunteer 'special constables' who wear similar uniform and have the same powers of arrest as regular constables. Many sign up due to the fierce competition to get into the police service, so a couple of years as a volunteer gives a better chance of being hired as recruitment opportunities arise. University degree's are not uncommon for British cops these days such is the competition.

I was wondering if similar volunteer law enforcement exists in the US, and if not, could it be an option to save tax dollars and protect schools at the same time?
I'm sure there are decent citizens in every town who would be willing to serve their communities as volunteers, and as policing is decided at a local level, would I be correct thinking if a community wanted such a service they can simply just get it done?
Anyway, just a thought, volunteer cops work well here, the only difference is their insignia, and you'd hardly notice if you didn't know.

So, stupid idea? impractical? Solution for cash strapped communities? I'm interested in any thoughts so thanks in advance.




posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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Make it a "Service" and recruit law enforcement candidates from it. I like it.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

I think it's a great idea. Very practical and efficient. And I'd bet plenty of cops -- employed, unemployed, retired -- would be happy to do so.

If anyone objected, it would probably be the police unions... I expect they would have a problem with their members working on a volunteer basis. I'd hope not, but that seems to be how unions operate.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Playing Devil's Advocate here: what happens when one of these pseudo-officers goes rogue, or even decides to sign up, simply because they know they will gain access to the schools and can unsuspectingly launch an attack in this position of power?



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: The GUT

Good idea, like entry level policing which it effectively is over here.
I bet there'd be no shortage of decent people in every community who would wish to protect their schools as volunteers. Okay there's training costs, uniform, firearm, etc, but take the wage element out of it and the savings are massive. It's certainly why skint Britain has them, they're only recruiting volunteers at the moment in my police area.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

Good question, but I guess the same could be asked about a regular cop. I can only speak of our British volunteer cops, but they are vetted to the same standards as regulars, and pseudo is not appropriate for them because they are warrant carrying constables with the same powers as a regular.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
If anyone objected, it would probably be the police unions... I expect they would have a problem with their members working on a volunteer basis. I'd hope not, but that seems to be how unions operate.

I hadn't thought about that. UK police are not allowed to strike so their union is more of a talking shop than anything.
With the cuts in police budgets though our regular cops are grateful for the 'specials' because their shift would be harder without them.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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Let's just put in the thought scanners they already have.

Hope nobody wake up feeling moody.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Thanks for your reply - I would think a thorough vetting process and regular mental health/follow up screenings at per-determined intervals may be a good starting point.

I have no idea they had such "Special Constables" in the UK - could be an effective route to take here in the US



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy


With the cuts in police budgets though our regular cops are grateful for the 'specials' because their shift would be harder without them.


I hadn't looked at like that, but I would think the same would be true of our officers here. Even if the union didn't like, I'm sure the officers on the streets would appreciate it, and the members themselves might just overrule the union so to speak...



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

It's illegal for law enforcement to go on strike here, as well. Baltimore PD tried to strike in the '70s and they got the boom lowered on them bigly.

As far as your OP, a lot of agencies have what we call reserve or auxiliary officers. A reserve officer's level of training and authority depends entirely on the agency he volunteers with, and it can be anywhere from fully sworn and armed to completely unarmed and shuffling paper and answering phones.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Same thing that would happen if someone becomes a teacher with the goal to commit a legendary school shooting....Students die.

@ CornishCeltGuy
Some people have suggusted former military could/would also volunteer.

You still have the same issue, if someone wants to do a mass killing of students, you just switch locations. Cannot get into the school, get on the school bus. Cannot get on the school bus, go to the HS sporting event/dance.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Our Schools should not, and generally do not require Police.

They should be on and in our towns and streets doing there job tackling real criminals.

As to these unpaid volunteer special constables, i hope they are vetted properly?



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

They've been a part of British policing since the 1830's in their current incarnation. You mostly see them on the weekend patrolling with regulars in bar/club land, and to be fair if you removed the 'specials' there aren't enough regular cops to keep the peace with us drunken Brits.
I genuinely think it could be a good thing for US communities, and easy to set up I assume, can the mayor or whoever just decide it if they think it would work?



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy




University degree's are not uncommon for British cops these days such is the competition.


woah there....what do you think this is!? here in amerika we like our cops just smart enough to pull the trigger but to dumb to question their orders:

abcnews.go.com...



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy
As to these unpaid volunteer special constables, i hope they are vetted properly?
Yes, to the same standards as regulars. It's actually really quite difficult to get into the specials these days.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: SocratesJohnson




You still have the same issue, if someone wants to do a mass killing of students, you just switch locations. Cannot get into the school, get on the school bus. Cannot get on the school bus, go to the HS sporting event/dance.


yeah i mean its almost like you can't legislate yourself into perfect safety...



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: smkymcnugget420

From your own article:


Most Cops Just Above Normal The average score nationally for police officers is 21 to 22, the equivalent of an IQ of 104, or just a little above average.


Guess if our cops are so "dumb" that they still come in at the above average level, that says a lot about everybody else



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: SocratesJohnson
@ CornishCeltGuy
Some people have suggusted former military could/would also volunteer.

You still have the same issue, if someone wants to do a mass killing of students, you just switch locations. Cannot get into the school, get on the school bus. Cannot get on the school bus, go to the HS sporting event/dance.

Fair point, I guess I'm just thinking that safety actually at school would be improved with cops on campus, as shown with the resource officer who got the shooter in the other thread.
My thoughts were also toward funding issues in cash strapped counties so wondered if the UK volunteer model could be appropriate in the states.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
As far as your OP, a lot of agencies have what we call reserve or auxiliary officers. A reserve officer's level of training and authority depends entirely on the agency he volunteers with, and it can be anywhere from fully sworn and armed to completely unarmed and shuffling paper and answering phones.
Thanks for the reply, interesting, so it seems there is already a similar model in place as it is. Would it work at county level do you think?



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