It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Home purchase is so much harder for young people than it was 20 years ago

page: 11
15
<< 8  9  10    12 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 11:24 AM
link   
Your pathetic post has really angered me......to the point that i am in a nice warm pub drinking the most expensive beer on tap.
You have quit on life and expect us to feel sorry for you. Boooohoooo. If you were on here trying to put it back together then i would empathise and encourage you. But no. You just want someone to stroke your broken ego and tell you that you have an ism.....here son...have some pills to cure your ism. Pathetic fool. Life dont give a damn bout no one! You gotta make the most of your microsecond of existance here... grrrr. Peeps like you wind me up!!!

a reply to: intrptr




posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 01:20 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

LMAO, I was gonna suggest some 'man-up' pills

...still not quite sure how a house price inflation discussion ended up at Western nations bombing brown people in deserts. The member tends to do that a lot though, then accuses everyone else of being part of the problem.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 02:08 PM
link   
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Keeping a post on target nowadays is like herding cats.....it's damn near impossible.

ANYWAYS....there must be a point where this trainwreck meets the end of the track. I know people go on about green belts, but lets be honest here, there is a lot of set-aside land not being used and that is just ridiculous. Not only that,, but the government is not addressing the foreign "investment" by Chinese and Russians who lap up every available property to flip later on. Cambridge is rife with Chinese investment, and then jack prices up. Sheik Mohammaad whats-his-nuts of Dubai owns half of Newmarket, yet there are loads of disused properties going derelict and the council says nothing.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 02:19 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

Greenbelt is the only way forward in my area, or maybe high rise. All, and I mean all brownfield/spare/industrial land has been built on, all that's left is expanding into the countryside or concreting over public parks.
I can't see any other solution, and until a decision is made then the existing properties will just continue to rise faster than wages.
Planning rules need to change as well, a mate of mine wanted to build in his back garden, but because the design couldn't accomodate exterior leisure space it was refused...it's across a quiet single lane road to a beautiful public park ffs, and it would have sold easily.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 02:25 PM
link   
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy


How much of that brown belt land has been used for affordable housing rather than luxury holiday homes for oligarchs?



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 02:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Fermy

Good question. We have the added problem here that people from London and the likes buy second homes and because they don't live in the homes the local government misses out on property taxes. Many councils are trying to get a change in the law.
Some towns and villages in my region are virtual ghost-towns in the winter because so many are 'second' homes.
It is a real problem.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 03:34 PM
link   
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Funny that, we bought a second place years ago in Hunstanton on the Norfolk coast. It was reasonable back then...I think we paid 80k. Then my wife wanted a shack...errr...beachhouse for 15K!! I was like, biggest waste of money ever. Weeeell, color me stupid, cuz the house is now at 500k and the shack is worth 45K. Insane, but it's because the Londoners "found" it.


They still pay council taxes, BUT, they dont live there so 11 months a year they sit empty, which means there is nobody at home to buy local goods from local shops.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 03:41 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

Beach huts are stupid prices here as well now, I've been on the waiting list for a rented council one for years, maybe I'll get one when I retire lol
Council tax depends on the local authority though, some offer a discount for empty properties, some are looking at charging extra under new legislation.
I'm not one for imposing restrictions on people buying second homes, but it is a tragic fact that some seaside villages are becoming ghost towns in the winter with empty second properties...and locals can't afford to live in their towns of birth.

...you sound minted by the way lol, and yes to Holly Willoughby as you said earlier!



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 04:48 PM
link   
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy


When I bought my home back 18 years ago, I had to fight to get a fix rate. And so did and didn't lose my home like so many. Not even a financial wizard here and could smell what those boys were cooking with those "adjustable" rate dam things.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Logarock

Yes I always went 'fixed rate' even if it was slightly more expensive. I remember people losing their homes after a 2-3% rate increase...tragic.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:29 PM
link   
I wish minted.! We lost 90k in the 2008 housing crash and hunstanton was 50/50 with the sis in law which turned ugly.
In order to sell florida at a reasonable price ...i did a lease to buy. Basically i am renting the house out to the buyers while they save up a deposit to buy in 24 months. Stipulation is that they have to fix up specified things and they pay for anything that breaks. Its for 24 months. It works out for both of us as we save on realtor fees, i get 24 months rent, and if they dont get a mortgage after 24 months i can reposses the house.

reply to: CornishCeltGuy



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:32 PM
link   
I am really wondering what will happen post brexit. No way interst stays this low. And when it goes up....it will be like the 80's when peeps just left the keys on the table.a reply to: CornishCeltGuy



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:35 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

You've got a beach hut!

...agreed on interest rates though, I see many people struggling if they rise by one or two percent.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:37 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

I tried a rent to own in Florida myself. I got taken fairly bad in the sense that I counted/trusted the income to assist me with the mortgage when I moved to Tennessee.
I wound up repossessing the house after about a year of tall tales and went back down, signed with a realtor and sold for a very, very small profit.
That's where I was though 15 years ago and just wanted out.
Glad that you were successful.



posted on Mar, 20 2018 @ 05:40 PM
link   
The only hope is for the old Baby Boomers to just die and make their houses available for the next generations. As soon as the population drops to one per house, that should make the prices much more attractive.



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 09:54 AM
link   
a reply to: Blue Shift

Interesting thoughts because divorce has also contributed to problem of housing shortage. Families split between two houses instead of one as in the classic nuclear family days.

Old people living alone is another example, my own mother is rattling around alone in a 5 bed 2 bathroom house while there are families struggling in small apartments. I keep suggesting she downsizes but she simply replies "I like my house".



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 10:07 AM
link   
a reply to: TNMockingbird

Wow, I bet that was a pretty stressful time for you. At least you broke even, I imagine that's you done with being a landlord again?
What's the property price difference between TN and FL, do you get more for your buck up where you are now?



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 11:16 AM
link   
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Very stressful LOL but live and learn!
You definitely get more 'bang for your buck' here. I made a lot more money in Florida though so it sort of evens out, if you know what I mean?
Funny story, the first place I ever bought, maybe I was 22 or so just out of divorce, was a mobile home on a lake. It was just a little single wide trailer and it doubled in price in about 8 years. The second place, was a total fixer upper (you know I like those!). Sitting in the living room one night there was this loud crash from the kitchen and the fridge had fallen through the floor. Evidently the ice maker had been leaking underneath for quite some time. It's funny looking back now. We hadn't gotten to the kitchen remodel at that point. That place sold with a nice enough profit to put the down payment on the last one that I wound up basically getting rid of.
I'm happy to say that I'm out of that game and looking for the camper near the beach



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 11:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: Blue Shift

Interesting thoughts because divorce has also contributed to problem of housing shortage. Families split between two houses instead of one as in the classic nuclear family days.

Old people living alone is another example, my own mother is rattling around alone in a 5 bed 2 bathroom house while there are families struggling in small apartments. I keep suggesting she downsizes but she simply replies "I like my house".


There is a very good reason why people say "I like my house" if you see what's available to you in an urban setting, instead, such as rentals.

I'm curious about why young people who might be able to work via home computer don't buy inexpensive rural land (with possible future resale investment?) and live in tiny houses or used mobile homes, or convert metal shipping containers? Is land in the U.K. and rural areas, say 1.5 hours away from an urban centre, that expensive?



posted on Mar, 21 2018 @ 11:58 AM
link   
a reply to: TNMockingbird

Ah the mobile home by the lake sounds lush

Loved the fridge crashing through the rotten floor story lol, I was working on a similar place yesterday, total death trap until we'd finished the initial rip-out.
Glad you broke even in your property adventures though, and I agree, the camper van by the beach idea, always been a dream of mine since I was talking with friends at primary school aged about 8. Well, the initial dream was driving across the US in a van, but getting older now it's looking less likely.



new topics

top topics



 
15
<< 8  9  10    12 >>

log in

join