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Russian Spy Poisoning Brings £48 Million Reward For Porton Down

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posted on Mar, 22 2018 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: Whereismypassword

He was being physically restrained. His stab vest had stopped the first two XREP's. He was never actually tasered or twitching. They tried to creep up on him from behind but he heard them. One of the XREP men with ten minutes training in using the unapproved weapon, (one shot into a bin bag on an industrial estate close to the stand-off), rushed forward and shot him in the side of the forehead with the XREP, not understanding the close range effects. No-one at Taser would take the blow of the XREP. The advertising video cut between a man and a dummy. The man you see collapsing in the advertising video had the prongs manually inserted into his skin then the juice switched on just out of camera shot.

The self loaded shotgun cartridge was the official lie to try to crawl out of that mess.




posted on Mar, 22 2018 @ 03:51 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit



Before former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia collapsed on a park bench in Salisbury on 4 March, the only other person confirmed to suffer the effects of novichok was a young Soviet chemical weapons scientist.

“Circles appeared before my eyes: red and orange. A ringing in my ears, I caught my breath. And a sense of fear: like something was about to happen,” Andrei Zheleznyakov told the now-defunct newspaper Novoye Vremya, describing the 1987 weapons lab incident that exposed him to a nerve agent that would eventually kill him. “I sat down on a chair and told the guys: ‘It’s got me.’”

By 1992, when the interview was published, the nerve agent had gutted Zheleznyakov’s central nervous system. Less than a year later he was dead, after battling cirrhosis, toxic hepatitis, nerve damage and epilepsy.
www.theguardian.com...

Even Special Brew doesn't do that to you.

Nasty.
edit on 22 3 2018 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2018 @ 10:29 AM
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The UK had just committed a catastrophic blunder in shouting around against Russia, in regard to the Skripal "poisoning".
But don't worry ... it took less then a week for the EUrotards to join into the bandwagon of making fun of themselves.

edit on 23-3-2018 by Flanker86 because: c



posted on Mar, 23 2018 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel
Maybe because they are bottom feeders, like the law firms who advertise about finding people with medical malpractice claims. It only takes one stray court decision to set all of those T.V. commercials off. The insurance industry hates them.



posted on Mar, 23 2018 @ 03:00 PM
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This 'Russian businessman' thinks British secret services will kill him for political gain.



He made clear he now believed his life was in danger because of the British secret service - and his bank accounts and credit cards had been suddenly blocked.
www.mirror.co.uk... ampaign=google_news&utm_content=sitemap

They stopped my mail for three months once. The only notable effect was ultra street cred with local organised crime who keep close tabs on the mail service through their pet posties. I've no doubt British secret services can freeze bank accounts. Pity they can't act like grown-ups.



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 06:21 AM
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Oh ... Now they can produce every kind of nerve agent in Porton Down, to be used by terrorists, thanks to the White Helmets and thanks to a fabricated story in Salisbury.

Where's the OPCW inspection of the whole UK ? Where's the psychiatrist for Gavin Williamson ?
All questions everyone is asking at the moment !



posted on Jun, 24 2018 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: Kester


It is interesting that such an attack would come in a location so close to the UK chemical weapons research station, Porton Down.

The history that the town of Salisbury has, in terms of its having been experimented on by the operators of the research branch at Porton Down in the past, and its close proximity to the installation, casts a muddy light on this situation. Looking at this from the perspective of the British government, if there were to be a chemical attack on the people of this country (which, regardless of the identity of the primary target, this most certainly qualifies as), the ideal place for it to happen is somewhere close to the resources they would want to deploy, to combat the threat represented by it. This occurring so close to Porton Down, means that even in the event of a wider spread assault, the best resources we have as a nation to deal with it, would have been right on top of the exposure site, able to immediately respond to the situation if necessary.

It would be like a person starting a fire right across the street from the fire station, or a thug performing a mugging outside the police station. If the intention of the perpetrator is to cause harm, it would make more sense for them to do their business further away from the resources which might best foil their plans, or limit the effectiveness of their plans.

But no, this man was poisoned within easy reach of the nations foremost experts in chemical and biological warfare, the only people in the country who could be expected to step in to positively effect this specific situation. Surely some other method of assassination would have been more... effective in this instance? Deaths made to look like accident or suicide would be preferable, surely, to attacking a man with a nerve agent, right on the doorstep of the people who could most effectively prevent his death? You don't shoot a man with a pistol when he is sat within a battle tank, and you do not attack a man with nerve agent, right on top of a chemical weapons research laboratory. It makes very little sense, as operations go.

Some might say "Well sure, but it sends a heck of a message!". It does, but at this stage the message is simply that this was a messy, unprofessionally organised hit, using a method ill suited to the situation, which has failed to kill its target as of yet, had collateral effects, and has attracted an awful lot of negative attention toward the assumed perpetrator, or at least, the nation from which they allegedly came.

Perhaps the Russians chose to attack close to PD in case more people were effected by the nerve agent they don’t want to go killing random civvies when you’re already walking the edge by targeting their “problem” it might be a reach but just throwing it out there...



posted on Jun, 25 2018 @ 04:10 AM
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a reply to: BigDave-AR

Russia doesn't give a damn about collateral damage, any more than the US government does. When Russia sent a hitter after Alexander Litvinenko, the hitter or hitters used a radioactive material, polonium 210, squirted into the targets tea. It was days between the poisoning, and the effects beginning to tell. That means that it was days where the cups, saucers, teapot and the location in which the poisoning was carried out, were sealed off by authorities, tested, and decontaminated.

The poisoners also had radioactive material on them, which they spread around the planes they caught out of the country, and every place they went. Now, this means that the location and the tea service particularly, were a threat to anyone in them for long periods. So, the staff of the place the poisoning happened for example. If any of them had a higher than average number of X-rays within the last little while, or any of the regular customers had, the trace radiation could have put them at significant risk. Anyone who happened to work in fields where radiation exposure is an occupational hazard? Also at risk of being put over their safe limits for a years exposure. The methodology was such, that the target could not be the only person effected in some way by the tools used to remove him.

Russia does not care, and we KNOW it was Russia that pulled that hit, because as dirty as it was, the man died, painfully I might add.

But the Skripal case is different. The hit failed, and whatever you say about Russia, they might be messy when they work, but they get the damned job done. Again, hitting a guy right next to a chemical and bio weapons research facility makes no sense. What would have been a damned sight smarter, is having someone pop the guy in the mouth as he snored in bed, with a small caliber, suppressed pistol. The hitter could have been over the Russian border before anyone even knew Skripal was dead. Instead, an over complicated hit, in a location where the health of the target is more easily recoverable than at any other place in England?

It stinks. It doesn't sound as coldly calculated as what I have come to expect from Russia. I expect people to actually die when Russia seeks to kill them, and the reason I expect that, is because that is what tends to actually happen. Perhaps the best evidence to exonerate Russia in this case, is the fact that the life of Sergei Skripal persists to this day, as does that of his daughter, thank goodness.



posted on Jun, 25 2018 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit


Actually, Russia does have a history of failed assassination attempts, see article here:

Putin's Poisons

So, no, they do not "always get the damned job done".

Personally I think that this has all the hallmarks of Russia. I don't understand why these two are still alive and am no expert but maybe it was a duff batch or something went wrong with the method of delivery, but I am still going with Russia teaching "traitors" or potential traitors a nasty lesson.



posted on Jun, 26 2018 @ 02:06 PM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy
a reply to: TrueBrit


Actually, Russia does have a history of failed assassination attempts, see article here:

Putin's Poisons

So, no, they do not "always get the damned job done".

Personally I think that this has all the hallmarks of Russia. I don't understand why these two are still alive and am no expert but maybe it was a duff batch or something went wrong with the method of delivery, but I am still going with Russia teaching "traitors" or potential traitors a nasty lesson.



I do wonder why they wouldn’t just go the polonium route like they have before since the agent was going to get tracked back to Russia, and the polonium is a more effective form of rubbing someone out in a guaranteed and horrid manner as a lesson and have it be their new calling card for their assasinations.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: BigDave-AR


The Polonium in the Litvinenko case left a radioactive evidence trail that led to the culprits. This attempt seems to be more deniable by Russia as evidenced by all the woo-woo on here about the Brits done it because: Porton Down.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: BigDave-AR


The polonium was traced as it left "flags" all over the place and was easier to place blame where it belonged, with Putins goverment. By doing it this way, it has "some" deniability and Putin and his goverment can try and place the blame elsewhere.



posted on Jun, 27 2018 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: Kurokage
a reply to: BigDave-AR


The polonium was traced as it left "flags" all over the place and was easier to place blame where it belonged, with Putins goverment. By doing it this way, it has "some" deniability and Putin and his goverment can try and place the blame elsewhere.

That’s true but did Russia face any real backlash except for political talk with Litvenenko case or the chap before him that got the the ricin injected into his leg by a Polish(?) agent using a rather nefarious umbrella? The chances of them recovering from this attack is looking more likely were as with the Polonuim poisoning you might as well just put them out of their misery before they die a guaranteed horrific death.



posted on Jun, 28 2018 @ 04:17 AM
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a reply to: BigDave-AR


There was a Police investigation and an extradition request and there was some pretty serious diplomatic falling out.

The umbrella case was Georgi Markov and it was a Bulgarian agent - article here:

Telegrap h Article



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