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Gobekli Tepe-An enigmatic find.

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posted on Mar, 16 2018 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

In that example it's only possible to state that the figure is masked with regards to recognizing the general type of figure that is represented though the visual evidence in itself is suggestive in terms of the edge of mask being seen , interestingly the lead archaeological team at Gobekli Tepe has just recently produced a paper on Masks and Masquerade in the Early Neolithic, it's not readily available at the moment but they include example from Gobekli Tepe and they'd be aware of the case to be made.


This paper reviews evidence for masks in the Upper Mesopotamian Pre-Pottery Neolithic. Possible stone miniatures (and one supra life-sized example) of masks from sites like Jerf el Ahmar, Göbekli Tepe and Nevalı Çori are discussed. It is argued that during the early Neolithic in the Near East, masks and masking possessed a significant role in rituals reenacting mythological narratives closely related to death, taking place at sites with special purpose buildings and a noticeably rich iconography


In the general context of early Neolithic figurines seated examples are invariably female and in Vinca culture of the suited and booted variety, but consider the two examples from Vinca culture below, on the right is an example of a typical female figure in the suit and boots and flat tending towards the triangular mask, these often don't have indications of the mouth on them only the large almond shaped eye pieces and pronounced nose guard, the woman on the left however holding the offering bowl is well represented in natural terms yet if you look closely it can be seen she also is wearing a mask, likely for cultic reasons, it's also worth noting the stool she is sat upon the common Vinca type is the same in general proportion to what the Gobekli Tepe figurine is seated upon.



The mask that she wears has general comparison in style and shape with these examples of Spirit Masks from early Neolithic Israel, there are free standing examples of the triangular masks such as these from Vinca culture, but these would have no practical application, ie you couldn't see or breath through them if wearing such, so more likely created objects of veneration.



edit on 16-3-2018 by Sigrun because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 16 2018 @ 10:28 AM
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If you go to alamy.com and search "Aegean woman grotesque" you will see 2 more examples of this theme.

Peace

P's I think they are wearing masks
edit on 16-3-2018 by Parta because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2018 @ 01:10 PM
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originally posted by: Sigrun
a reply to: Byrd

In that example it's only possible to state that the figure is masked with regards to recognizing the general type of figure that is represented though the visual evidence in itself is suggestive in terms of the edge of mask being seen , interestingly the lead archaeological team at Gobekli Tepe has just recently produced a paper on Masks and Masquerade in the Early Neolithic, it's not readily available at the moment but they include example from Gobekli Tepe and they'd be aware of the case to be made.


This paper reviews evidence for masks in the Upper Mesopotamian Pre-Pottery Neolithic. Possible stone miniatures (and one supra life-sized example) of masks from sites like Jerf el Ahmar, Göbekli Tepe and Nevalı Çori are discussed. It is argued that during the early Neolithic in the Near East, masks and masking possessed a significant role in rituals reenacting mythological narratives closely related to death, taking place at sites with special purpose buildings and a noticeably rich iconography


In the general context of early Neolithic figurines seated examples are invariably female and in Vinca culture of the suited and booted variety, but consider the two examples from Vinca culture below, on the right is an example of a typical female figure in the suit and boots and flat tending towards the triangular mask, these often don't have indications of the mouth on them only the large almond shaped eye pieces and pronounced nose guard, the woman on the left however holding the offering bowl is well represented in natural terms yet if you look closely it can be seen she also is wearing a mask, likely for cultic reasons, it's also worth noting the stool she is sat upon the common Vinca type is the same in general proportion to what the Gobekli Tepe figurine is seated upon.



The mask that she wears has general comparison in style and shape with these examples of Spirit Masks from early Neolithic Israel, there are free standing examples of the triangular masks such as these from Vinca culture, but these would have no practical application, ie you couldn't see or breath through them if wearing such, so more likely created objects of veneration.




Hmm. I would agree that the one on the left is wearing a mask (or may be tattooed) but I'm not convinced the one on the left is wearing a mask. I would have put the flatness of the face as being due to the material that's being worked.

Based on the references in the paper on Masks and Masquerade, they appear to be referencing only the larger limestone pillars and not any small items from Gobekli Tepe. I didn't try to buy the article, so I can't really say here... this is just an impression.

I'm not really convinced here but as I say, this is not my area.



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