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Breaking News! third AATP UFO Video Has Been Released!

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posted on Mar, 13 2018 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: Paddyofurniture

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: TritonTaranis

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: Illumimasontruth
a reply to: humanoidlord

Cold and moving around 300 miles per hour.

I'll go out on a limb here and say it is not a bird.


Could it have been a drone?


Cold, the object was cold, a drone would be hot as we don't have that kind of technology yet, st least not publicly knowledgeable


It shows up as white with the water dark in the background. That means it gives off heat. It shows up dark when it is reversed with the water light in the background.



No ,

The Raytheon cockpit display is in ‘black’ mode as designated in the left hand corner of the display.

Hot items are black and cold items are white.

See discription here:

coi.tothestarsacademy.com...





Well then. The mystery deepens. Would gravity waves give off heat?




posted on Mar, 13 2018 @ 10:44 PM
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originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: Paddyofurniture

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: TritonTaranis

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: Illumimasontruth
a reply to: humanoidlord

Cold and moving around 300 miles per hour.

I'll go out on a limb here and say it is not a bird.


Could it have been a drone?


Cold, the object was cold, a drone would be hot as we don't have that kind of technology yet, st least not publicly knowledgeable


It shows up as white with the water dark in the background. That means it gives off heat. It shows up dark when it is reversed with the water light in the background.



No ,

The Raytheon cockpit display is in ‘black’ mode as designated in the left hand corner of the display.

Hot items are black and cold items are white.

See discription here:

coi.tothestarsacademy.com...





Well then. The mystery deepens. Would gravity waves give off heat?


The Go Fast UAP was cold and it just so happens supercooling a semiconductor to achieve quantum locking would...
edit on 13-3-2018 by GodKilla because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2018 @ 11:09 PM
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originally posted by: GodKilla

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: Paddyofurniture

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: TritonTaranis

originally posted by: 3daysgone

originally posted by: Illumimasontruth
a reply to: humanoidlord

Cold and moving around 300 miles per hour.

I'll go out on a limb here and say it is not a bird.


Could it have been a drone?


Cold, the object was cold, a drone would be hot as we don't have that kind of technology yet, st least not publicly knowledgeable


It shows up as white with the water dark in the background. That means it gives off heat. It shows up dark when it is reversed with the water light in the background.



No ,

The Raytheon cockpit display is in ‘black’ mode as designated in the left hand corner of the display.

Hot items are black and cold items are white.

See discription here:

coi.tothestarsacademy.com...





Well then. The mystery deepens. Would gravity waves give off heat?


The Go Fast UAP was cold and it just so happens supercooling a semiconductor to achieve quantum locking would...


Would give off heat? But it was cold.



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: 3daysgone


Exactly why it would be cold, quantum locking only happens when you super-cool a semi-conductor

youtu.be...



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: 3daysgone

I think Raytheon would be in a position to analyze what is seen in those videos. So what do they say?


Navy pilots used Raytheon tech to track a strange UFO

(...) Even so, the video images are not definitive proof that the jet pilots were chasing an actual UFO.

“To really be sure, we would need the raw data,” said Dr. Steve Cummings, vice president of Technology Development and Execution at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. “Visual displays alone are not the best evidence.”


The above quote is a comment on the first videos published by TTSA in December. Could it be that the guys over at TTSA know the ATFLIR system a lot better than the manufacturer?



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: zetaReticulous

was going to post that, very interesting and seems to lend credence that its something more than an bird



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR




posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: GodKilla
a reply to: 3daysgone


Exactly why it would be cold, quantum locking only happens when you super-cool a semi-conductor

youtu.be...


Do you believe that super-cool semi conductor's would be used with a magnetic field or to generate one?



posted on Mar, 14 2018 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
a reply to: 3daysgone

I think Raytheon would be in a position to analyze what is seen in those videos. So what do they say?


Navy pilots used Raytheon tech to track a strange UFO

(...) Even so, the video images are not definitive proof that the jet pilots were chasing an actual UFO.

“To really be sure, we would need the raw data,” said Dr. Steve Cummings, vice president of Technology Development and Execution at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. “Visual displays alone are not the best evidence.”


The above quote is a comment on the first videos published by TTSA in December. Could it be that the guys over at TTSA know the ATFLIR system a lot better than the manufacturer?


By using the raw data they could get the more precise signal the RCVR picked up. To distinguish the hi/lo end of the wave. If it went above and below the range of the RCVR. Cross referencing the signal, studying the carrier wave, they may be able to tell a lot more about the footage.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 07:30 AM
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The footage is as confusing as it is intriguing. I've stopped by at Metabunk and the Paracast to see some of the very determined efforts by the mathematicians there to try and get a handle on what it is. Whilst I admire their very intelligent efforts and the lengths that they have gone to, I still don't think they can arrive at a 'bird' or 'balloon' conclusion, because there is simply too much margin of error.

It's fairly safe to assume the object is small, comparatively speaking, certainly much smaller than their aircraft. The movement that we perceive in the footage may well be due to the parallax effects and the movement of the F18.

I'd like to know if the 'lock' was slaved from radar to the ATFLIR. Or if they were using IRST (was 2015 too early for them to have been using IRST?) and they were slaving to that. They certainly had some trouble acquiring the target and seemed overjoyed/surprised that they had managed to get a lock. I'd also like to know if other systems - with accurately known position - were tracking this target.

I'm hoping Zaph or Bassplayer will have give some input - but I'm 99% certain that ATFLIR can be slaved to radar.

As for deriving truth data from that one sensor - for an exact position and speed of the unknown target - it seems unlikely. Keep in mind what the ATFLIR is predominantly used for - a self designation system for splatting guided weapons into a bad guy. It saves having to have some other guy, in another aircraft, shine his Litening system while you deliver the guided weapon. It's not generally associated with high resolution recreational video in Dolby Vision or Geodetic Survey.

What some people are trying to do is prove that the object is a bird/balloon based on methods of calculation that have margins of error far larger than the thing they're trying get a handle on. Others are trying to describe what this thing is just looking at 30 secs of low resolution video.

I don't like the bird hypothesis. It doesn't look/feel like a bird to me, yet it still could be I suppose. I used to operate military EOT's and also a MOTR radar system once upon a time. I've seen many, many different types of weapons platforms and different kinds of tracking systems. I have a fairly good handle on how accurate truth data can be turned into useful trajectory data. You'd need a lot more than just 1 video to do it I'm afraid.

But - the video is something. It's not just random lights in the sky and hopefully more will follow. I don't know what to make of TTSA - I'm keeping an open mind, but at least there are some interesting videos coming out!



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: horatio321

IRST21 was approved for production in January of 2015.

ATFLIR can be slaved to radar for air to air or air to ground modes.

A part of the problem with analyzing these videos is the misunderstanding of FLIR that is taking place, not just on ATS, but pretty much everywhere.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks for your reply. So, IRST might well have been implemented then and ATFLIR can be slaved to radar. In the video, you can clearly see 'Slave' along the right-hand side. I was really hoping you might know if this meant 'Slave' was on. :p

Presumably Slave with a line through it would mean Not Slaved.

This might indicate slaved radar lock, which in my estimation, makes it less likely to be a bird. However, a balloon with a radar reflector would be much more likely - which could only be more boring should it happen to have been swamp gas. :/

The target was either not moving very fast or was not moving at all. What a shame we didn't have more footage. I wonder why not?

You're right - there's a lot of confusion around FLIR, but hopefully most of the basic stuff has been covered. How people think they can come up with an Excel spreadsheet trajectory without multiple mount data, angular survey and correct use of smoothing I'll never know. :/ Fair play for trying. I just didn't have the heart to say



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: horatio321

The pod has multiple point modes. When it's in SLAVE mode, it's tracking with either the HUD or the radar of the aircraft. When it's in HUD mode, for air-to-ground, it tracks the CCIP for the weapon that is selected if it's a dumb bomb, or the GPS coordinates if it's a JDAM or GPS weapon. When it's slaved to the radar, it will track whatever the radar is locked on to.

The display shows that it's in slave mode. If it was in one of the other modes, it would show either nothing there, or it would show the mode designation for whatever mode it is in. Since this shows SLAVE, it's in that mode.

Some of the better guesstimates I've seen for the target is somewhere around 65-70 knots or so.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 01:52 PM
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Thanks for making that nice and clear. It does look like the camera was being manually slewed onto the 'thing' until he got a lock. Then they got all excited etc. So radar lock on to an Albatross? I don't think so. Unless the Albatross was wearing a transponder! Lol.

Over on the other sites, they were calculating trajectories (with a fair margin of error!) to about about 38kts. In fact 2 separate guys calculated the speed to with 1kt of each other.

Looking at the way the 'thing' appeared to be moving, prior to lock, it seemed to be in a dead straight line.

I prefer the higher 60-80kts, but that's because I'd rather it not be a bird or a balloon!

Cheers for your insight.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: horatio321

Uhm, you do realize that a primary radar, which is what the APG-65 and APG-73 are, is perfectly capable of seeing birds, right? The software usually ignores targets below a certain speed, but the radar still sees them.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm aware that the Radar has the potential to 'see' any kind of return, no matter how small - but that it's tricky without pre planning to acquire and stay locked on.

I'm not familiar with the operation of the APG 65/73 systems, but assumed that having the radar set so as to see targets as small as a bird would leave the operator with a large mess to sort out - clutter, seduction etc.

With a seagul, there's the small matter of 'microwaving' it with non-ionizing radiation whilst it's on the wing. It doesn't end well for the bird! Certainly with MOTR, they would literally drop out of the sky :/

Even with tracking F22 Raptors, their RCS was so small, the only realistic way of acquiring and maintaining a tidy track was with a cooperative friendly transponder.

For those reasons (as well as a gut feeling) - I can't really roll with the bird hypothesis.
Not yet anyway! Lol
edit on 1532018 by horatio321 because: Typo on mobile!!



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: horatio321

All the radar would have to do is see the bird long enough for the ATFLIR to lock on. And if they did manage to lock on to a bird, that would certainly get the crew excited and laughing.

Locking on to a bird with a FLIR, at 200 mph would be something to brag about and would be hard as hell to one up in the squadron, and would be a good way to learn the limits of the system.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: horatio321
I don't know what to make of TTSA - I'm keeping an open mind, but at least there are some interesting videos coming out!

It's at least something happening in the UFO field, which has been in the doldrums for years. This at least gives us something new to look at instead of old cases.



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Right - I'm with you.

You know, that would explain the whooping and cheering etc. LOL! The dialogue was vague otherwise.

And no Seagulls were downed!

Erm, my senses are still nagging me though....



posted on Mar, 15 2018 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: horatio321

Personally, I wouldn't be surprised if they were some kind of drone used to test the ATFLIR and IRST21 systems. The timing of both videos is right around when ATFLIR was introduced and upgraded, and when IRST21 was in testing. But, at the same time, I can see it being a bird, especially based on the crew reaction.



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