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Great BOLs of fire - plasma, EM and quantum mechanics

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posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 02:51 AM
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Introduction

Balls of light or ball lighting have always been some sort of a mystery. Mainly because they don't occur that often and are very unpredictable, it's a phenomenon very hard to study. There have been attempts to create and study these effects in laboratory conditions, and it seems progress is being made in this field.

One study that has recently been released shows findings that may be of interest for some of you on these boards.



Abstract
Classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are both central to the modern understanding of the physical world and its ongoing technological development. Quantum simulations of electromagnetic forces have the potential to provide information about materials and systems that do not have conveniently solvable theoretical descriptions, such as those related to quantum Hall physics, or that have not been physically observed, such as magnetic monopoles. However, quantum simulations that simultaneously implement all of the principal features of classical electromagnetism have thus far proved elusive. We experimentally realize a simulation in which a charged quantum particle interacts with the knotted electromagnetic fields peculiar to a topological model of ball lightning. These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion—a topological excitation that was theoretically predicted four decades ago but never before observed experimentally. Our results reveal the versatile capabilities of synthetic electromagnetism and provide the first experimental images of topological three-dimensional skyrmions in a quantum system.


Link to the full study
advances.sciencemag.org...

While this is some pretty heavy stuff I do suggest to dive in and have a look at the basic concepts, as I will do myself. These phenomena are a recurring theme in for instance mirageman's Rendlesham topic so I believe this is a pretty big advancement (in white science).

So what people are seeing is all natural?
Not per se ... As Andrew Pike points out in his book The Rendlesham File, exotic technology may produce the same atmospheric phenomena. In this regard, while like in this book I believe many effects of what people are seeing is by natural cause, I also do follow having an open mind without getting carried away.

Feel free to add or discuss anything along these lines.


edit on 9-3-2018 by zeroPointOneQ because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 07:24 AM
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Unfortunately for the layman that article is top heavy on scientific language. It is not really aimed at the more general audience reading this forum. A few members might well understand the explanation:


These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion


But to fully engage more people that needs to broken down and explained.

Anyway I don't know for sure if we are dealing with a similar natural BOL phenomenon at Hessdalen in Norway. But they have been studying it for more than 30 years and it certainly fits in with the topic of the thread.



I usually find that rolling out this short video helps as well.



From what I can gather if we can work out how these BOLs are created in nature it may also lead us to a new cheap, clean energy source.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 09:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: mirageman
Unfortunately for the layman that article is top heavy on scientific language. It is not really aimed at the more general audience reading this forum. A few members might well understand the explanation:


These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion


But to fully engage more people that needs to broken down and explained.

Anyway I don't know for sure if we are dealing with a similar natural BOL phenomenon at Hessdalen in Norway. But they have been studying it for more than 30 years and it certainly fits in with the topic of the thread.



I usually find that rolling out this short video helps as well.



From what I can gather if we can work out how these BOLs are created in nature it may also lead us to a new cheap, clean energy source.



I'd summarize that paper as platting fog. Consider a magnetic field line as a piece of infinite thin piece of wire, make it twist four times as it is wrapped once around a fat donut shape (in the sense that at any cross-section, the two separate circles intersect). Repeat this again and again. Eventually all those wires would form a continuous solid rigid 3D object that won't collapse into a point or fall apart, but hold together like some piece of modern art or maybe a tangled up slinky.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: mirageman

I apologize for posting it in it's mostly scientific form. I'm not familiar with most of the concepts either and still struggling through myself.

There's a great Belgian article published on one of the best news sites here. If I find the time I'll try to translate some of it since it's easier to understand.

Link here: www.vrt.be...



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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My own sighting of a huge BOL in my youth is what led me here in the first place. Once the internet came along, I found other reports from antiquity to the present that were descriptive of my own experience.

I'd say the study you shared here is probably quite a bit behind whatever the scientific arm of the MIC knows at this point. Long before Project Condign--near the latter part of WWII--the Brits had a project looking at the possibility of weaponizing plasma balls. I can't recall the name of that project at the moment, but I'll dig it up in a bit and post it here.


This phenomenon is referred to in the report as "Buoyant Plasma Formation," akin to Ball Lightning, and is hypothesized to produce an unexplained energy field which creates the appearance of a Black Triangle by refracting light.

The electromagnetic fields generated by plasma phenomena are also hypothesized to explain reports of close encounters due to inducing perceptual alterations or hallucinations in those affected.

The Condign report suggests that further research into "novel military applications" of this plasma phenomenon is warranted, and that "the implications have already been briefed to the relevant MoD technology managers.

The report also notes that scientists in the former Soviet Union have identified the close connection between the 'UFO Phenomena' and Plasma technologies," and are "pursuing related techniques for potential military purposes."

Project Condign



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: The GUT

I'd say the study you shared here is probably quite a bit behind whatever the scientific arm of the MIC knows at this point. Long before Project Condign--near the latter part of WWII--the Brits had a project looking at the possibility of weaponizing plasma balls. I can't recall the name of that project at the moment, but I'll dig it up in a bit and post it here.



I agree. According to Andrew Pike's book research even predates WWII, but indeed took off shortly after.

This however seems to confirm a lot of what's being posted here. It also confirms a hypothesis posted in 'Nature' in 1996 where it was stated EM currents are able to trap plasma within, according the article I posted earlier.
edit on 9-3-2018 by zeroPointOneQ because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

And a link to an English article:
www.sciencenews.org...

The images will make things way more clear.

edit on 9-3-2018 by zeroPointOneQ because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: zeroPointOneQ

I think Science is starting to look into the right areas and realms to advance our understanding past the point that Einstein stops working and Quantum aspects take over.

I've noticed that Bohm's observations of plasma organizing in life-like manner are starting to get some serious play in theoretics and research lately. Where it used to be an acknowledged anomaly just kind of sitting there, it's now being taken more seriously as indicative and worthy of answering more of our questions.

It's pretty sad that science does most of it "advancing" in the attempt to weaponize knowledge. At best we get some trickle-down information and at worst we have no idea of the real advancements that have been made.

EM rules and regulates the universe and life itself---therein lay the answers to most all of our greatest mysteries it seems.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: zeroPointOneQ

Here's a translation



Is the solution to the mystery of the ball lightning a skyrmion, a tangle of magnetic fields around plasma?

Researchers have for the first time succeeded in binding the magnetic fields of a supercooled quantum object in a complex special node. That quantum phenomenon has a number of properties that are thought to occur with the enigmatic ball of lightning, and can explain their origin. According to physicists, their research may in time lead to more efficient ways to keep plasma together, which can lead to the creation of more stable fusion reactors.

The bizarre, complex node of which there is a quantum object called a "Shankar skyrmion". Its existence was first theoretically put forward in 1977, but until now nobody had succeeded in manufacturing one in a lab. Now that physicists from Aalto University in Finland and the American Amherst College in Massachusetts have succeeded, and they have also been able to photograph the phenomenon.

A skyrmion is a tightly connected group of circular magnetic fields, with each circle crossing every other circle exactly once. It can be imagined as a key ring to which a second key ring is attached. Then rings are added, with the new ring always enclosing the others. The shape that one gets then would look like the magnetic fields of a skyrmion.

But a skyrmion differs from the key rings in an important way: it is contorted. The intertwining magnetic lines twist twice in the course of their path, so that a mini-spacecraft that would follow such a line would rotate twice around its axis in the course of the runway.


Bose einstein condensate

The researchers constructed the skyrmion from a cloud of atoms that were supercooled into a dense clump called a forest cone condensate. That is a state of matter that only appears at the absolute zero point, where the boundaries between atoms start to melt, and where quantum effects begin to occur not on the tiny scale that normally is the case, but on a scale that we can more easily trace and observe people.

"The quantum gas is cooled down to a very low temperature, on which it forms a forest condense condensate: all the atoms in the gas end up in a state of minimal energy, a state that no longer behaves like a gas but as a single gigantic atom", said doctor David Hall at Sputniknews. Hall is a professor at the Amherst College and one of the authors of the study.

Using techniques developed to build an exotic class of quantum magnets, the researchers gave the spin or the magnetic orientation of the atoms in the condensate nudges, until the interlocking rings of the skyrmion appeared, they said in Live Science. And at that moment it became clear that the skyrmion could be a good model for ball lightning.

Ball lightning

Ball lightning is a rare weather phenomenon about which little is known. These are brightly colored illuminated spherical objects that usually appear during heavy thunderstorms, but sometimes also in clear weather. They seem to shoot through the air, and remain visible for seconds, much longer than an ordinary lightning bolt.

The spheres, usually as big as a tennis ball, sometimes as big as a football and exceptionally much larger, can penetrate houses, along a chimney, a window or a door. There are even reports of ball lightning coming through a closed window, sometimes with damage as a result, sometimes without leaving any trace.

During a thunderstorm, the phenomenon, which ultimately lasts only a few seconds and is unpredictable, can hardly be studied, and attempts have been made to create ball lightning in laboratories. A limited number of these have also succeeded, but they do not provide an explanation of what ball-lightning could consist of in nature, or how they might arise. There are a number of hypotheses, but many questions remain.

It is often assumed that a ball lightning consists of plasma, a state of matter in which a large part of the atoms is ionized - which means that the atoms have lost electrons and have become an ion, a particle with a positive charge. The electrons can move freely, making plasma one electric charge, and usually it is also very hot. It is also assumed that lightning can cause plasma to develop.


Magnetic fields

In 1996, a study in "Nature" already proposed that bolt lightning could be the result of magnetic fields around the plasma of a lightning bolt, which tied themselves into a knot and trapped the plasma, and the study also presented a model of how those crocheted fields might look like. The researchers now say that the fields they have observed around their cold, small skyrmion correspond to the model proposed in the study. According to them, that means that the hot ball lightning is in fact gigantic, naturally occurring skyrmions. "It is remarkable that we could create the synthetic electromagnetic node - that is, a quantum ball lightning - essence with only two electric currents circulating in each other, and therefore it can be possible that a natural ball lightning can develop in a normal lightning strike ", said co-author doctor Mikko Möttönen. According to Möttönen, further studies on creating real ball lightning with their method can help other researchers to "find a solution to keep plasma together efficiently, and enable more stable fusion reactors than we currently have." the Finnish and American researchers on the skyrmion have appeared in "Science Advances".

Original (Dutch language) source : www.vrt.be...




posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: mirageman

The new energy source you mention that might come from the orbs is a good one and we might be on the brink of saving planet earth if we can get to grips with it asap before the nukes or carbons take us out.

The orbs do seem to live / travel along ley lines, these might be possible to harness to provide power in some way. Also the orbs themselves might be a way of harnessing energy, if you can get right close up to one and I'm talking the amber / orange type then you can see how they sort of spin on their axis just like a gyroscope, the swirling motion is something moving so fast.............. Maybe someone in the know will be able to harness this movement to turn into electricity in the future.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 03:28 PM
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A fiery balled foo fighter: Is a nuts an bolts starship...that is safely housed within it's off board, magnetically contained fusion plasma shield; be it with the low power reddish-orange fusion plasma power phase or it's high-power bluish-white plasma.

Documentation: From various recorded foo fighter sightings and UFO landing zones on Earth.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: ufoorbhunter
a reply to: mirageman

The new energy source you mention that might come from the orbs is a good one and we might be on the brink of saving planet earth if we can get to grips with it asap before the nukes or carbons take us out.

The orbs do seem to live / travel along ley lines, these might be possible to harness to provide power in some way. Also the orbs themselves might be a way of harnessing energy, if you can get right close up to one and I'm talking the amber / orange type then you can see how they sort of spin on their axis just like a gyroscope, the swirling motion is something moving so fast.............. Maybe someone in the know will be able to harness this movement to turn into electricity in the future.



Ley lines are thought to be local magnetic field line loops formed by locally magnetized rocks and also by moving water carrying metallic impurities. Those would have the ability to nudge ball lightning in particular directions.



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: zeroPointOneQ
a reply to: mirageman

I apologize for posting it in it's mostly scientific form. I'm not familiar with most of the concepts either and still struggling through myself.

There's a great Belgian article published on one of the best news sites here. If I find the time I'll try to translate some of it since it's easier to understand.

Link here: www.vrt.be...


If you use Chrome, it may give you a popup asking if you want the page translated (as mine does on any non english site). It's a decent translation



posted on Mar, 9 2018 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: zeroPointOneQ
Introduction

Balls of light or ball lighting have always been some sort of a mystery. Mainly because they don't occur that often and are very unpredictable, it's a phenomenon very hard to study. There have been attempts to create and study these effects in laboratory conditions, and it seems progress is being made in this field.

One study that has recently been released shows findings that may be of interest for some of you on these boards.



Abstract
Classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are both central to the modern understanding of the physical world and its ongoing technological development. Quantum simulations of electromagnetic forces have the potential to provide information about materials and systems that do not have conveniently solvable theoretical descriptions, such as those related to quantum Hall physics, or that have not been physically observed, such as magnetic monopoles. However, quantum simulations that simultaneously implement all of the principal features of classical electromagnetism have thus far proved elusive. We experimentally realize a simulation in which a charged quantum particle interacts with the knotted electromagnetic fields peculiar to a topological model of ball lightning. These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion—a topological excitation that was theoretically predicted four decades ago but never before observed experimentally. Our results reveal the versatile capabilities of synthetic electromagnetism and provide the first experimental images of topological three-dimensional skyrmions in a quantum system.


Link to the full study
advances.sciencemag.org...

While this is some pretty heavy stuff I do suggest to dive in and have a look at the basic concepts, as I will do myself. These phenomena are a recurring theme in for instance mirageman's Rendlesham topic so I believe this is a pretty big advancement (in white science).

So what people are seeing is all natural?
Not per se ... As Andrew Pike points out in his book The Rendlesham File, exotic technology may produce the same atmospheric phenomena. In this regard, while like in this book I believe many effects of what people are seeing is by natural cause, I also do follow having an open mind without getting carried away.

Feel free to add or discuss anything along these lines.




So what we saw in the 60's was ball lightning? I don't believe it.

I'm sorry but what I saw was stable for several minutes and was dead steady, west to east and was big.

I don't believe it was a natural phenom.

What the hell it was, I have no idea. It dripped fire, FIRE!!!










posted on Mar, 10 2018 @ 05:51 AM
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a reply to: burgerbuddy



So what we saw in the 60's was ball lightning? I don't believe it.

I'm sorry but what I saw was stable for several minutes and was dead steady, west to east and was big.

I don't believe it was a natural phenom


Why are you assuming that this article is an explanation of your sighting?



posted on Mar, 10 2018 @ 07:45 AM
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a reply to: burgerbuddy

Let me put it this way. The more we learn about whatever phenomena exist and how they work, the smaller the pool of the unknown gets. I do believe while our understanding grows, a lot of cases could possibly be explained.

It's not a one theory fits all and it's certainly not my intention to explain everything away with this.

edit on 10-3-2018 by zeroPointOneQ because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2018 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: burgerbuddy

originally posted by: zeroPointOneQ
Introduction

Balls of light or ball lighting have always been some sort of a mystery. Mainly because they don't occur that often and are very unpredictable, it's a phenomenon very hard to study. There have been attempts to create and study these effects in laboratory conditions, and it seems progress is being made in this field.

One study that has recently been released shows findings that may be of interest for some of you on these boards.



Abstract
Classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are both central to the modern understanding of the physical world and its ongoing technological development. Quantum simulations of electromagnetic forces have the potential to provide information about materials and systems that do not have conveniently solvable theoretical descriptions, such as those related to quantum Hall physics, or that have not been physically observed, such as magnetic monopoles. However, quantum simulations that simultaneously implement all of the principal features of classical electromagnetism have thus far proved elusive. We experimentally realize a simulation in which a charged quantum particle interacts with the knotted electromagnetic fields peculiar to a topological model of ball lightning. These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion—a topological excitation that was theoretically predicted four decades ago but never before observed experimentally. Our results reveal the versatile capabilities of synthetic electromagnetism and provide the first experimental images of topological three-dimensional skyrmions in a quantum system.


Link to the full study
advances.sciencemag.org...

While this is some pretty heavy stuff I do suggest to dive in and have a look at the basic concepts, as I will do myself. These phenomena are a recurring theme in for instance mirageman's Rendlesham topic so I believe this is a pretty big advancement (in white science).

So what people are seeing is all natural?
Not per se ... As Andrew Pike points out in his book The Rendlesham File, exotic technology may produce the same atmospheric phenomena. In this regard, while like in this book I believe many effects of what people are seeing is by natural cause, I also do follow having an open mind without getting carried away.

Feel free to add or discuss anything along these lines.




So what we saw in the 60's was ball lightning? I don't believe it.

I'm sorry but what I saw was stable for several minutes and was dead steady, west to east and was big.

I don't believe it was a natural phenom.

What the hell it was, I have no idea. It dripped fire, FIRE!!!









I agree with the deduction of you're UAP sighting....definitly not ball lightning.



posted on Mar, 10 2018 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

Very interesting Stormcell......................... I can see where you are getting at. Ball lightning may well be bounced about by the ley lines. Still doesn't account for stationary orbs, orbs in perfect circle above ones head, bullet golf ball white type orbs that go straight at you and stop in an instant a few inches from your eyes (rather un nerving) but I do follow on the angle grinder white type that morphs into a angel light. That might be bounced about by the lines. Very interesting, thanks for this



posted on Mar, 10 2018 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: vlawde

True, but as my native language is Dutch I don't get that suggestion


I saw mirageman provided a translation allready (big thanks by the way).



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