It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

If you knew a nuclear missile was inbound to your area, and you had an hour before it hit....

page: 10
36
<< 7  8  9   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 05:48 PM
link   
a reply to: amazing

Buddy if you are within a certain radius of the blast, even if you were shielded from the Gamma-rays, and somehow managed to mitigate the thermal component, the overpressure is pretty much going to kill, crush, destroy everything.

Cant think of the circumstances that would possibly allow you to survive such an event if you are within that big red circle short of being miles under the earth in a gooberment DUMB.





edit on 17-4-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 05:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: amazing

Buddy if you are within a certain radius of the blast, even if you were shielded from the Gamma-rays, and somehow managed to mitigate the thermal component, the overpressure is pretty much going to kill, crush, destroy everything.

Can think of the circumstances that would possibly allow you to survive such an event if you are within that big red circle short of being miles under the earth in a gooberment DUMB.






Still like you said...how close...how high...are you under ground...how big is the nuke.



posted on Apr, 17 2018 @ 06:03 PM
link   
a reply to: amazing

Use these little utilities and find out.


nuclearsecrecy.com...

nuclearsecrecy.com...

Might get away with it if you were in a deep basement or subway tunnel but i don't imagine you would be coming out to much.

Also if the area you are in is not hermetically sealed all the oxygen would be sucked out of your lungs and they would collapse.
edit on 17-4-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 09:30 PM
link   
I'd tell the person who got our whole dept fired to watch my spot.



posted on Apr, 18 2018 @ 10:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Cassi3l

I've been curious about sex during an emp.
All hooked up to a 6 volt battery.
Randy!



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 12:55 AM
link   
a reply to: Gazrok

Grab my bug out bag, and head for someplace upwind, and on the back side of a hill. I can travel quite a ways in an hour...

One of the advantages of living in the scrubs, or really close to 'em.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 04:00 AM
link   
A lot of humor replies to this thread...... May I the sad sap that would request that we get back and answer this with consederation and honesty. In other words... let's pretend for a moment that this is going to happen.

I thought about this the other day, mostly because of all this Russia US BS in the middle east. Then I realise that I haven't been able to find out if we have any fall out shelters what so ever in our neighbourhood, even less if they are suited for nuclear war.

SO... accept the following and answer with dignity if you have any suited answer for it:

- If a modern day warhead was deployed within 50 km of your home, what are the chances of survival?

- Does it make sense at all to try to escape / drive somewhere to get away from the impact site?

- If you live in the outer radius of the blast zone, ie. not in the zone that will be hit by fire / explosion but instead the furthest radius, will you be safe in a cellar? (if the entire building doesn't collapse on top of you that is)

- What's the contamination radius from impact of modern day warheads? Ie. how far do you have to live from the impact site, if we DONT take into account weather conditions?

- Sub-question. If you do live inside the contamination radius, I take it that a "normal" cellar won't be enough? (I'm asking because I honestly don't know what requirements are necessary to stay clean....)

- For how long does fallout last after detonation? Are we talking days / weeks? What if the wind is going one direction during detonation but then changes to the opposite direction after say 2 days?


See, I thought, that if it was broadcast that Copenhagen was due to be hit in 1 hour, I would steal the company car and race home (that's 20 min gone) then just grab them all and head further north to the coast line. But that still only places us 50 km from impact. Optimally I would drive us far up into Norway, but that would mean fleeing up through Sweden and that will probably go straight to hell when every else is as well. Then we'd have to steal a boat... but would it be big enough to fare well on the open sea.... so many questions.

So in the end it boils down to wether to actually try and run, or go prepper mode and stock up bottled water and tinned tomatos and toilet paper and so on, but our cellar really isn't air tight at all and our home is only 25 km from impact site.... so... a slow death?

Like others have said, having kids, just isn't great when imagining this scenario :S Either you watch them die or they watch you die... # sake, I hate politicians and their bull# quarrelling and warmongering.
edit on 19/4/18 by flice because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 04:41 AM
link   
Terrain will help. Cellar will help. It's really just a massive explosion. Trains were still running in Nagasaki after the blast... Life went on, and they were not taking simple precautions we would take today. If you survive the pressure and the flash (burns), you probably make it out alive if you're not directly handling lots of irradiated stuff right afterwards. People relatively close but in a cellar lived long lives. You want to avoid carrying around dust or inhaling it if possible, but it's not a guaranteed death sentence.

The longer you avoid the fallout the better. Most of the fallout lands close to ground zero. And the farther you are away from whatever is emitting gamma rays, the better. Same with insulators. The more dense the better. So staying in the cellar insulated by concrete and earth is advised for awhile. They used to teach the 7-10 rule. After seven hours, the radiation drops by a factor of ten. After 49 hours, by 100. 343 hours later, the radiation is at 1/1000th the zero-hour levels, etc.

The bigger problem will be like any natural disaster when the infrastructure is affected. Food supplies dwindle. No running water. No electricity. No electronics. Nowadays most cars would be affected. A lot of scared, starving people running about is bound to be a bad time.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 05:35 AM
link   
I would never in my wildest dreams imagine I would get a whole hour notice a missile would hit in one area. If I was at work an hour away from home and thought I could get away before roads were jammed, I might try to get home. If I thought I was going to die, I'd say some prayers and wait for the end. I might go inside a bathroom just in case the missile wasn't nearly as strong as expected or missed the target so that I might live instead of people caught outside killed by shrapnel simply because they were outdoors trying to escape. I'd try to get as many walls as possible between me and the outside as if I was trying to survive a tornado if I didn't try to flee.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 06:36 AM
link   
a reply to: Gazrok

I live and work so far away from anything important enough to warrant a nuclear strike, an hours notice would mean everything else was blown away yesterday.

I live so far back in the woods, the sunshine is a day late.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 10:10 AM
link   

Then I realise that I haven't been able to find out if we have any fall out shelters what so ever in our neighbourhood, even less if they are suited for nuclear war.


You most likely do not. Most governments abandoned the idea years ago due to costs, even the US. Doesn't mean they still won't work (if not converted to something else by now), but that they won't be staffed or equipped. However, the good news, is that today's nukes are FAR less powerful than the ones in common usage during the cold war, and are more air burst vs. surface burst (so far less radiation too).


Does it make sense at all to try to escape / drive somewhere to get away from the impact site?


In most cases, yes, distance is your friend, IF you can actually get outside the radius in time. But, if known, expect traffic to factor in, so unless you are in an area that's low in population (and likely not in a target area to worry about it), then you should think more about getting to a secure area of the building without windows.


If you live in the outer radius of the blast zone, ie. not in the zone that will be hit by fire / explosion but instead the furthest radius, will you be safe in a cellar? (if the entire building doesn't collapse on top of you that is)


Everything is relative, depends on the structure, the size of the nuke, surrounding structures, etc. But, much safer than if exposed, so give yourself a fighting chance.


What's the contamination radius from impact of modern day warheads? Ie. how far do you have to live from the impact site, if we DONT take into account weather conditions?


Go to nukemap to see. Can even Google on the most common nukes. Most of today's aren't over the 1.5mt range, and are airburst, which limits the radiation. Radiation also decays exponentially, so the most dangerous time for it, is the soonest after the blast.


Sub-question. If you do live inside the contamination radius, I take it that a "normal" cellar won't be enough? (I'm asking because I honestly don't know what requirements are necessary to stay clean....)


You do the best that you can. The good news, is that the most dangerous time is the first 48 hours, so if you can seal up well enough avoid or at least mitigate that, and still have enough to breathe, etc., you're doing good. If you do become exposed, you mostly want to ditch those clothes, and shower off.


For how long does fallout last after detonation? Are we talking days / weeks? What if the wind is going one direction during detonation but then changes to the opposite direction after say 2 days?


Again, relative with the size of the nuke, but also remember the decay is exponential. So the longer you wait, the better. (but, you've got about a half hour after the blast before the heavy particles start falling, to try and get somewhere that will offer the best radiation protection) You want as much mass as possible between you and the radiation. Your risk is then pretty low 12 hours after (yes, just 12 after, then much less after 24, then 48 when you're at about 1%).

Here's a great article that may allay some of your concerns:
io9.gizmodo.com...
edit on 19-4-2018 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 10:21 AM
link   

I live and work so far away from anything important enough to warrant a nuclear strike, an hours notice would mean everything else was blown away yesterday.


I wish it were the same for me. While my home is far from any targets, my work is close enough to definitely have me worried about it.

I've actually got to look around my work for other nearby buildings. Mine has WAY too much glass that will likely get blown out.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 10:29 AM
link   
I found this thread again this morning, and started doing some research. My family lives in a fairly rural location an hour from the nearest city. We are probably at one end of the bell curve, as far as suvivability is concerned.

I looked on a nuclear map website, and calculated a hit with this morning's wind direction. The warhead I ran the scenario for was a Chinese Dong Feng-5, a 5 megaton detonation. I think it would make sense to attack US civilian targets on a weekday morning during rush-hour. Commuters in cars would be largely unprotected, and the gridlock would be exacerbated by parents rushing to collect their children from schools. A horrible thought.

As it happens, this morning the wind is coming from the direction of prevailing winds in my area. And so the fallout would not affect my home, or the kids schools. Of course, I would have no way of knowing that in a real time event.

Since we don't have television, and I'm not playing any radio, I probably would not know of a detonation in our area until there was a flash and the lights went out. If my cell phone and automobiles didn't function, I for one would assume that there had been an EMP. Knowing that most BMPs would accompany a nuclear blast, I'd head downstairs and start pulling out our prep bags. our basement would provide pretty good shielding, though not as good as a prepared bunker. The basement is heated by a wood-burning stove, and so our plans during an electrical outage involve taking refuge there. The wellhead is also a joining the basement, so I can get water from the well manually, without having to go outside the home. We have rehearsed having the kids walk home on their own from their respective schools; but I suspect one of us adults would have to go pick them up – the authorities would probably hold them until they were picked up by us.

We have more food in the freezers then we could eat before it went bad. Still, I would improvise some coolers to keep it at least refrigerated for a day or two while we had a massive barbecue party. Most of the livestock feed is in sealed containers that would protect it from particulate fall out dust. So I would be fairly prepared to shelter in place, with food stocks in storage to last a couple of months, and animal protein on the hoof the last for several months more. I assume that most of the game in the woods would be hunted out by that point, but with small game and gardening, I expect that we could make the transition to the world after the bombs, with at least some chance for long-term survival. I have enough potassium iodide tablets for everyone in the family; and even some neighbors now too, since I am too old to be at risk for cancer from radioactive iodine following a blast.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 10:52 AM
link   
mad is not even a proven theory and experiments that have tried to prove it have indicated that mad doesn't actually work, if an icbm is heading your way though, in that situation you ignore everything and run to the nearest uninhabited area outside the city or town.

to me though i'd not really do anything but wait for the end, i kind of need a working power grid to live anyway.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 12:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: namehere


to me though i'd not really do anything but wait for the end, i kind of need a working power grid to live anyway.


Do you have medical issues (dialysis, insulin dependency) that make you say that? Or are you referring to the food supply or dependency o fossil fuel?

There are a lot of threats to the grid, more eminent than a nuclear detonation coming to your town. Hacking probably tops the list. Ukraine is a state that at one point had its economy crippled by hackers taking down the national grid. A lot of intel in the US believes that Ukraine is being used for practice, to hone skills for eventual use against the USA.

Making plans against a grid-down event might be critical for you individually.



posted on Apr, 19 2018 @ 03:32 PM
link   

We have more food in the freezers then we could eat before it went bad. Still, I would improvise some coolers to keep it at least refrigerated for a day or two while we had a massive barbecue party.


One thing I learned during Hurricane Irma. A packed freezer, accessed only once or twice a day after losing power, will keep food cold for at least 4 days. Heck, I had to THAW chicken breasts on day 3....so if that gives you any idea.

A 5mt missile is probably going to be more reserved for a more hardened target. Russia and China know they need to use sheer volume to counteract our BMDS (ballistic missile defense system), so they are going to launch multiple missiles at more strategic (not population) targets.


mad is not even a proven theory


Over 70 years without a nuclear war seems to be evidence to the contrary. The concept of Mutually Assured Destruction is indeed one of the key reasons we haven't had to experience one (and are highly unlikely to). As Joshua said in the movie WarGames, "Strange game...the only winning move...is not to play." He wasn't wrong.



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 09:47 PM
link   
I live at least an hour away from a city of large size and it would probably not be a primary target but Atlanta could get hit in a war. I have no idea how long the radioactive fallout would take to reach my area but I expect EMP effects might cause my car to die rather quick. If I was at work, I doubt they would want everyone taking off unless they were certain. By the time they were certain, the power might be off due to EMP and I would have to walk home. That might take a few hours if I'm working in the local area. I would work on that and try to find a radio and buy supplies at a local store with cash if I could. The real panic with a national power outage starts when people don't have water and no help comes and looters come out and you can't call the police. Travel would become hazardous fast I believe.



posted on Apr, 21 2018 @ 09:51 PM
link   
Nuclear Blast Calculator

Just to add a little perspective to the hypothetical.



I think if one was inbound I'd just hug my husband and go lie down, hold hands and prepare for the end.

Not anywhere to go, no cars, no bunkers close enough to merit an escape plan.

So it goes so it goes.

edit on 4/21/18 by GENERAL EYES because: grammar edits



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 12:45 PM
link   
Call my family, make sure they’re headed to the bug-out location (my house) then I’d probably go fishing.



posted on Apr, 24 2018 @ 05:23 PM
link   
Id get a electronic phase shield and hope i can phase back.



new topics

top topics



 
36
<< 7  8  9   >>

log in

join